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Author Topic: Morgan State Professor Charged with Defrauding NSF of Grant Money  (Read 6981 times)
southerntransplant
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No recess.


« on: November 17, 2012, 12:04:23 PM »

Link to Chronicle article.

Link to article in Baltimore Sun.

Note that this grant did not go through Morgan State's OSP but through the professor's private company since this was a Small Business Technology Transfer grant.

I sort of locked on this because someone I know was caught defrauding his university and, after repaying the money, was deported.
« Last Edit: November 17, 2012, 12:06:56 PM by southerntransplant » Logged

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alleyoxenfree
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Countin' all these posts as publications


« Reply #1 on: November 18, 2012, 4:12:43 AM »

No one thought it was odd that he claimed 160 peer-reviewed articles at this point in his career?  Did anyone check?
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daniel_von_flanagan
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« Reply #2 on: November 18, 2012, 6:20:07 AM »

Waste of NSF resources, they shouldn't be in the tech-transfer business. Just because most universities do a bad job of this, that doesn't mean there's any reason NSF would do it better. - DvF
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polly_mer
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Have you worked on that project today?


« Reply #3 on: November 19, 2012, 11:40:48 AM »

No one thought it was odd that he claimed 160 peer-reviewed articles at this point in his career?  Did anyone check?

What's fishy on the surface of claiming 160 peer-reviewed articles by a 45-year-old engineer?  His master's degree dates from 1993 and he's served in government capacities that may lead to co-authorship even though he didn't lead the team.  In addition, his doctorate is more than 10 years old in a field where publishing 20 articles a year is not unreasonable.

If we're immediately suspicious of people just because they have served in government and claim to have 150+ peer-reviewed articles as well as books (a quick check on Google scholar with some spot checking indicates that Jha at Morgan State did publish a reasonable number of things including a couple of easily located books), then we don't get out very much.
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archman
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« Reply #4 on: November 19, 2012, 1:22:33 PM »

Yeah, as a biologist, seeing some dude claiming 160 peer-reviewed pubs would scream suspicion immediately.

That high a number is very fishy. Even for the "gene jocks". For a professor of his age, at a R1, I would expect the "high end" to be one-third of that number.

Now if he's in been in government work most of the time, he could have his name on *dozens* of reports. But those are not usually peer reviewed at all. And I doubt even for that grey literature, he would not exceed more than 80 reports.

I guess cranking out an ungodly amount of peer-reviewed pubs is possible in engineering. The fellow in question is an engineer I believe.
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mozman
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« Reply #5 on: November 19, 2012, 1:34:19 PM »

Yeah, as a biologist, seeing some dude claiming 160 peer-reviewed pubs would scream suspicion immediately.

That high a number is very fishy. Even for the "gene jocks". For a professor of his age, at a R1, I would expect the "high end" to be one-third of that number.

I'm a biologist and I flat-out disagree with this. I'm younger than this guy and less than 10 years post-PhD and I'm close to 80 publications - should hit it next year. In 10 more years at this pace, I would fully expect to have 150+ papers (maybe sooner, as my publication rate is going up as the years pass).
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Could you grow the foot into another patient? I mean, you are a scientist.
archman
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« Reply #6 on: November 19, 2012, 3:26:14 PM »

Yeah, as a biologist, seeing some dude claiming 160 peer-reviewed pubs would scream suspicion immediately.

That high a number is very fishy. Even for the "gene jocks". For a professor of his age, at a R1, I would expect the "high end" to be one-third of that number.

I'm a biologist and I flat-out disagree with this. I'm younger than this guy and less than 10 years post-PhD and I'm close to 80 publications - should hit it next year. In 10 more years at this pace, I would fully expect to have 150+ papers (maybe sooner, as my publication rate is going up as the years pass).
Hm... must be field specific. I am intensely curious as to what field of biology cranks out at this rate, and what rates being considered a co-author.
« Last Edit: November 19, 2012, 3:29:31 PM by archman » Logged
busyslinky
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« Reply #7 on: November 19, 2012, 4:06:44 PM »

I was wondering about the 160 number as well.  But, you can consider some conference proceedings and even book chapters as peer-reviewed.

In some fields that is a very large number.  A quick Google Scholar search (Yes, there are more important things to do, but what is the Fora for if not for procrastination?) will show that he has a couple dozen journal hits, in the first few pages.  He probably has a number more not highly cited works.  Also, not all proceedings and book chapters are captured by Google Scholar. 

In NSF proposals you usually don't send a long CV.  I think they still only allow a 2 pager. 
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mozman
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« Reply #8 on: November 19, 2012, 5:06:52 PM »

Hm... must be field specific. I am intensely curious as to what field of biology cranks out at this rate, and what rates being considered a co-author.

Molecular biology (and microbiology and a few other subjects). We publish something like 10 papers a year from my lab.
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Could you grow the foot into another patient? I mean, you are a scientist.
archman
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« Reply #9 on: November 19, 2012, 5:28:44 PM »

Hm... must be field specific. I am intensely curious as to what field of biology cranks out at this rate, and what rates being considered a co-author.

Molecular biology (and microbiology and a few other subjects). We publish something like 10 papers a year from my lab.
Yea... I was half-afraid of hearing that exact answer. Ha.
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mozman
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« Reply #10 on: November 19, 2012, 5:41:18 PM »

Yea... I was half-afraid of hearing that exact answer. Ha.

Heh. No offense taken. Sometimes I have to sit back myself and ponder at the absurdity of it all.
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Could you grow the foot into another patient? I mean, you are a scientist.
archman
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« Reply #11 on: November 19, 2012, 5:45:02 PM »

Yea... I was half-afraid of hearing that exact answer. Ha.

Heh. No offense taken. Sometimes I have to sit back myself and ponder at the absurdity of it all.
Keeping track of all those manuscripts, grad students, grant proposals, etc... must be a #%^& nightmare. You have my sincere respect, admiration, and pity. Heehee.
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daniel_von_flanagan
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« Reply #12 on: November 19, 2012, 6:01:03 PM »

Not everyone is cranking out 10 peer-reviewed single author papers/year?  C'mon people, get cracking! - DvF
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mozman
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« Reply #13 on: November 19, 2012, 6:11:40 PM »

Not everyone is cranking out 10 peer-reviewed single author papers/year?  C'mon people, get cracking! - DvF

Single author?  What are you smoking? Average author number is 3-4; First author is the student/postdoc who did the majority of the work, second author is usually the junior grad student who helped, third author is my (phenomenal) technician, and last is me. I do a lot of data analysis and a fair amount of the writing (more or less depending on the English skills of the grad student/postdoc).

I actually do have about one single-author paper per year on average, usually from theoretical mathematical modeling stuff that I do on the side (my secret shame). Its unusual in my field - unusual enough to be remarked upon by letter writers in my promotion packet.
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Could you grow the foot into another patient? I mean, you are a scientist.
daniel_von_flanagan
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« Reply #14 on: November 19, 2012, 7:09:22 PM »

Well, originally I was going to write "Not everyone is cranking out 10 peer-reviewed single author papers/year in high-impact journals?" but I thought that would be asking too much. - DvF
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