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Author Topic: fall enrollment numbers?  (Read 16885 times)
worried again
Guest
« on: March 21, 2006, 3:20:22 AM »

Any news as to freshman #s at Dillard, Tulane, Loyola and Xavier? I am worried that although #s stabilized for this year, next year's freshman class could be significantly smaller...leading to lay offs
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UNO
Guest
« Reply #1 on: March 21, 2006, 8:11:16 AM »

I find it amazing that UNO is consistently ignored just about everywhere. Remember us? We have students too and we certainly are a larger presence in terms of research and nationally recognized programs than Dillard and Xavier.
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Why UNO is ignored
Guest
« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2006, 12:58:30 PM »

UNO doesn't give out info very much. Will there be financial exigency? Not?

UNO hides from the news.

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UNO/LSU connection
Guest
« Reply #3 on: March 21, 2006, 5:46:38 PM »

problem is that UNO is a decent school, but it is part of LSU system.  LSU system only cares about LSU baton Rouge.  Therefore, for UNO to get the attention it deserves, it must tell LSU to shove it and break off from the LSU system.  As they should have long ago!!!
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UNO
Guest
« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2006, 6:54:52 PM »

It is not just hiding from the news and it is not just an LSU effect. There have been administrative issues for years. YES - there will be financial exigency, we just don't know yet which faculty and programs are getting the axe although the chancellor's draft plan has been circulating for weeks with some fairly clear ideas. It's just that they are backtracking now that the plan has been leaked and they have had actually to solicit input from faculty. Imagine that.
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In Louisiana
Guest
« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2006, 11:10:20 PM »

The UNO administration has always been rumored to be weak, but who knows?

What's in the draft plan that's been leaked? Will graduate programs be cut?

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UNO
Guest
« Reply #6 on: March 22, 2006, 3:16:09 AM »

Regarding the weakness of the admin, it is not a "who know?" hands up in the air kind of question. It is weak. And yes, grad programs will be cut.
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In Louisiana
Guest
« Reply #7 on: March 22, 2006, 12:36:01 PM »

If the UNO plans have been leaked, and since you're under a screen name, why can't you reveal (in general) what the plans are?

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UNO
Guest
« Reply #8 on: March 22, 2006, 2:06:02 PM »

They are way too extensive to summarize here and plus are not in final form.
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In Louisiana
Guest
« Reply #9 on: March 22, 2006, 11:12:20 PM »

To UNO--I think you're bluffing. But OK, if that amuses you.

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UNO
Guest
« Reply #10 on: March 23, 2006, 3:21:01 AM »

I am not bluffing. I am not sure exactly what it is that you even would want to know. A run-through of departments and programs that have been targeted? The list isn't valid. The chancellor's plan was leaked about three weeks ago, and quickly got widely disseminated among the faculty. I read the plan. It was terrible. About a week and half ago the chancellor decided that because the proverbial cat was let out of the bag, he might as well go ahead and seek "input." So the document was officially released to all faculty as an email attachment distributed via departmental representative to the faculty senate. Since then we've heard nothing.

The plan is jarring. It lists programs targeted for the axe and also individual faculty lines. No names --- just yearly salary totals. The plan also includes consolidating some departments into large divisions, cuts out the Graduate College completely (putting burden of grad student admin onto the individual other colleges), and absolutely includes the dismissal of tenured faculty across all colleges.
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nolapoet
Guest
« Reply #11 on: March 27, 2006, 2:17:52 PM »

This is sickening. I am a native New Orleanian and a second-generation UNO graduate degree holder. While Tulane, Loyola, and Xavier unite for the cameras in a made-for-prime-time lovefest, the urban university that bears the city's name (and the largest burden of actually *educating* its citizens) gets crapped on for financial reasons.

While better-known private universities remained closed, UNO was first to reopen its physical campus (at the Jefferson center) and its dedicated faculty remained online so that students could continue and finish their semester. This story never has made any major news outlet, to my knowledge.

What a crime this is -- and I wonder how LSU, the flagship university which never has had much love for UNO, benefits. How many UNO students have been absorbed into Baton Rouge's campus?

New Orleans needs UNO's graduate college, particularly its schools of urban planning, history, music, education, and creative writing--tenured and not--more now than ever before.

Dr. Ryan, if you read this, to pull tenure out from under the city's top intellectual leaders at this crucial moment, and especially in the face of the faculty's dedication the past year, is wrong in every conceivable way. Recently, one of the university's top tenured faculty members spent about an hour trying to convince me to come home to rebuild. Your decision to boot tenured faculty, not to mention dedicated non-tenured faculty,  translates into several hashmarks in the "reasons not to move home" column.

I understand that there are brutal dollars-and-cents and enrollment issues. However, to take your best and brightest and to kick 'em to the banquette is not going to up your numbers among college-bound seniors and their tuition-paying parents. The most important resource of all is talent--especially under the current circumstances, when talent, frankly, is all that UNO has left to offer.

Once again, New Orleans' "leadership" sacrifices its best and brightest on the altar of Mammon. The new New Orleans will be wealthy, white, and transplanted, living in KB Homes built in historic African-American neighborhoods, and sending their kids to private colleges to study the extinct phenomena of jazz, New Orleans dialects, historic architecture, African-American folkways, and affordable quality public education.

But, hey. Whatever pays.

Signing my name in this public forum,
Robin Kemp, BFHS 1982, UNO MFA 2002
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UNO
Guest
« Reply #12 on: March 27, 2006, 2:55:59 PM »

Please send your message to the Times Picayune as a letter to the editor!
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lostintranslation
Guest
« Reply #13 on: March 27, 2006, 4:58:12 PM »

Yes, please send this to the TP editor; as a UNO alum and whose parents lost their house in New Orleans East it is very upsetting to hear what is happening to UNO.

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nolapoet
Guest
« Reply #14 on: March 27, 2006, 5:08:20 PM »

Forwarded the URL to the post with a note. URL also forwarded to a couple of academic listservs to which I belong.

Keep the faith!
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