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Author Topic: So what have you read lately  (Read 964198 times)
alastrina
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« Reply #2820 on: January 24, 2012, 5:37:30 PM »

Patchett it is.

In the meantime, I got "A Discovery of Witches" out of the library - not sure about it. Anyone read it? If it sucks, I'd rather just give it up and get the Patchett.

I finished it because I'm weird that way. Overall I thought it was pretty 'meh". The academic setting did not offset the "good Vampires who do yoga" issue, and the main character was a real Mary Sue and got on my nerves after a while.

I'd say go with the Patchett.

One of my goodreads friends who I respect gave it 1 star, but no review, so thanks - I didn't realize there were vampires. Witches I like, but vampires? Not really my bag.

I'm going to grab the Patchett and then tackle "Cellist". Woot!

I had the same response to it. Also, the main male character had the tendency to go all "alpha" on the female lead which annoyed me. The older I get the more the "I know best because I have a dick" attitude pisses me off.
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"One must always be careful of books," said Tessa, "and what is inside them, for words have the power to change us." -Cassandra Clare, Clockwork Angel
voxprincipalis
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« Reply #2821 on: January 24, 2012, 5:42:03 PM »

Help! I don't know what to read next! Here's my list of options:

Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children / by Ransom Riggs   
Caleb's crossing / Geraldine Brooks   
The tiger's wife : a novel / Téa Obreht   
The cellist of Sarajevo / Steven Galloway   
State of wonder / Ann Patchett   
Faith : a novel / Jennifer Haigh   
The painter of battles : a novel / Arturo Pérez-Reverte
Catherine the Great : portrait of a woman / Robert K. Massie

Can you go wrong, Prof Smartypants? Riggs, Brooks, Obreht, and Haigh are on my list right now too! I read Patchett a few months ago and thought it was a very engaging read.

I've just started Lev Grossman's The Magicians, and I'm loving it so far.


Patchett, Prof. S. Go.

I did not like The Magicians, but then, I do not like Grossman. (Pompous ass.)

Oh, TZ, this is sad. We must be reading opposites. I hate Ann Patchett with the fiery fury of a thousand suns.

Well, maybe that will be useful in figuring out what we may or may not like, based on what the other likes or dislikes?

VP
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marfa
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« Reply #2822 on: January 24, 2012, 5:47:29 PM »

The older I get the more the "I know best because I have a dick" attitude pisses me off.

I believe this should be your new tag line.  It definitely should be somebody's!
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alastrina
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« Reply #2823 on: January 24, 2012, 5:52:46 PM »

The older I get the more the "I know best because I have a dick" attitude pisses me off.

I believe this should be your new tag line.  It definitely should be somebody's!


I like that idea. <grin>
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tinyzombie
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« Reply #2824 on: January 24, 2012, 8:19:33 PM »

Help! I don't know what to read next! Here's my list of options:

Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children / by Ransom Riggs   
Caleb's crossing / Geraldine Brooks   
The tiger's wife : a novel / Téa Obreht   
The cellist of Sarajevo / Steven Galloway   
State of wonder / Ann Patchett   
Faith : a novel / Jennifer Haigh   
The painter of battles : a novel / Arturo Pérez-Reverte
Catherine the Great : portrait of a woman / Robert K. Massie

Can you go wrong, Prof Smartypants? Riggs, Brooks, Obreht, and Haigh are on my list right now too! I read Patchett a few months ago and thought it was a very engaging read.

I've just started Lev Grossman's The Magicians, and I'm loving it so far.


Patchett, Prof. S. Go.

I did not like The Magicians, but then, I do not like Grossman. (Pompous ass.)

Oh, TZ, this is sad. We must be reading opposites. I hate Ann Patchett with the fiery fury of a thousand suns.

Well, maybe that will be useful in figuring out what we may or may not like, based on what the other likes or dislikes?

VP

Pout.

Wait, this means we have a song! Friends after all.

So maybe you shouldn't read The Great Bridge.
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mickeymantle
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« Reply #2825 on: January 25, 2012, 12:08:24 PM »


I finished 11/22/63.  A bit long (nearly 900 pages!), but mostly an interesting read.  King's characterizations have become better over the years.
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voxprincipalis
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« Reply #2826 on: January 25, 2012, 12:16:16 PM »

Wait, this means we have a song! Friends after all.

So maybe you shouldn't read The Great Bridge.

Heh. Old Paula Abdul. How time flies!

So you liked The Great Bridge, then? Hmm. I am thinking about getting it just to see whether we are really opposites!

VP
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mickeymantle
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« Reply #2827 on: January 29, 2012, 5:19:40 PM »


Finished Asimov, well worth reading.  I wish I could say the same for Dune.  A bit dense for my tastes.

Now reading The Help.  Not badly written, but do I want to hear African-American women talking like in Gone With the Wind?
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voxprincipalis
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« Reply #2828 on: January 29, 2012, 5:23:31 PM »

Now reading The Help.  Not badly written, but do I want to hear African-American women talking like in Gone With the Wind?

The audiobook version of this is compelling. The dialect works really well.

I started The Maze Runner, and am torn about it. The premise captures my attention, but the writing is ... well, not horrible, but that's about all the praise I can give it. Is this what YA books are like nowadays? I thought The Hunger Games was, for the most part, very well-written; it never seemed like the author had to "dumb down" the language to make it intelligible to a YA crowd. The Maze Runner isn't as successful. I am interested to see how the plot turns out, though, so I may stick with it.

VP
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ranganathan
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« Reply #2829 on: January 29, 2012, 6:11:14 PM »



I started The Maze Runner, and am torn about it. The premise captures my attention, but the writing is ... well, not horrible, but that's about all the praise I can give it. Is this what YA books are like nowadays? I thought The Hunger Games was, for the most part, very well-written; it never seemed like the author had to "dumb down" the language to make it intelligible to a YA crowd. The Maze Runner isn't as successful. I am interested to see how the plot turns out, though, so I may stick with it.

VP

I'm sure some YA books are written horribly, but it's like adult fiction- some are good, some are horrible, some are awesome.  I very much enjoyed John Green's THE FAULT IN OUR STARS.  The writing could get a little hipster-y, but it was a compelling story.

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I just wish people were more like dogs--ready to learn and make friends with no private agenda.
conjugate
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« Reply #2830 on: January 29, 2012, 9:35:19 PM »


I am also engaged in reading some science fiction classics such as Ray Bradbury's The Martian Chronicles and Frank Herbert's Dune.  I've never been a big fan of the genre, but I thought such reading might be a change of pace.


Finished Asimov, well worth reading.  I wish I could say the same for Dune.  A bit dense for my tastes.


Which Asimov?  I'm contemplating some Heinlein re-reading, but am still a ways into an orgy of Pratchett re-reads.
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prof_smartypants
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« Reply #2831 on: January 29, 2012, 9:52:32 PM »

OK, so I finally finished "Housekeeping". While artfully and beautifully written, I found myself yawning. It was good - perhaps very good - just not for me.

I gave up on "A Discovery of Witches" and got "Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet". Happy about the switch. So far, this seems adorable. Just what I need.

I also am about halfway through the audiobook of "Gentlemen of the Road" by Michael Chabon - loving that! The hubby and I are 2 hours from the airport, and we listened to it there and back. We keep trying to come up with places to drive so we can listen to it more.

I'm not sure I'd like it as much if I were reading it. VP - you should check it out. Great narration.

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lohai0
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« Reply #2832 on: January 29, 2012, 10:03:31 PM »

I'm reading Archon right now. I'm rather enjoying it. It is pretty darn good for a first novel.
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voxprincipalis
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« Reply #2833 on: January 29, 2012, 10:08:18 PM »

I also am about halfway through the audiobook of "Gentlemen of the Road" by Michael Chabon - loving that! The hubby and I are 2 hours from the airport, and we listened to it there and back. We keep trying to come up with places to drive so we can listen to it more.

I'm not sure I'd like it as much if I were reading it. VP - you should check it out. Great narration.

Ooh! *adds to list*

Thanks for the heads-up!

VP
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itried
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« Reply #2834 on: February 08, 2012, 9:21:09 AM »

I recently started Susan Cain's Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World that Can't Stop Talking. Thus far in the book, she is contrasting our society's "Extrovert Ideal" with the positive contributions and qualities of introverts, and dispelling negative stereotypes about introversion. Her writing is terrific -- she's a spirited storyteller -- and she does a great job synthesizing the psychological research without sounding didactic or dull. It's wonderful, and it makes me feel less like a total freak of nature.
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