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Author Topic: CV confusion?  (Read 11591 times)
staypuff
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« on: May 06, 2012, 9:03:18 PM »


My university does not have a required format for my CV for the tenure package. 


Should I start with my strongest area?  (teaching, research)

Should I group research items?   then group another section, like teaching?
(I have seen pubs, presentations and then teaching, then followed by grant funding.)

Should I describe things?  or just one-liners?

Does work I have done at my prior university job go on my tenure CV?  (class taught, grants, etc)


I feel that I should say more than less, because the external reviewers will be seeing my CV and personal statement only.

Thanks!
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systeme_d_
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« Reply #1 on: May 06, 2012, 9:35:02 PM »

Use the CV format that is most usually seen in your discipline.

Just google up examples of CVs in your field.  I recommend taking a look at the CVs of people who might serve as your external reviewers.
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octoprof
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« Reply #2 on: May 06, 2012, 9:42:02 PM »


Does work I have done at my prior university job go on my tenure CV?  (class taught, grants, etc)


Yes.
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tee_bee
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« Reply #3 on: May 06, 2012, 11:01:02 PM »


My university does not have a required format for my CV for the tenure package. 


Should I start with my strongest area?  (teaching, research)

{snip}


I feel that I should say more than less, because the external reviewers will be seeing my CV and personal statement only.

Thanks!


A CV is not a resume--you don't have to lead with the strongest element of your record. You just order it based on good examples from colleagues in your discipline as noted. Also, yes, include more rather than less. A CV is not a resume--and even the hoary advice to "keep it to one page" for resumes has been largely discredited. So a CV will likely be quite a bit longer, If all they are going to see is your CV and personal statement, then be inclusive in the CV, so that you can focus on your research or teaching vision (if that's the right word) in the personal statement. This way, you don't have to write a narrative form of your CV as your personal statement or cover letter. This sort of thing drives me nuts, and sends applications to my personal round file.
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flotsam
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« Reply #4 on: May 07, 2012, 12:56:52 AM »

My university does have a set format, but if it didn't and I wanted to play it safe, I'd emulate whatever my colleagues did when they got tenure.  Try to get a number of different examples so you can compare.  Also, double-check to see if there's not a preferred format (even if it's not required), since the main idea is to put your information out there where committees can easily find it.

My CV was complete and comprehensive (as required), even listing course I taught as a graduate student. octoprof and tee_bee are correct, everything you've done should be listed on the CV, probably, but your tenure dossier itself may contain only those materials that "count" -- e.g., courses taught, articles published, service rendered while at this school and during the tenure/promotion period.  Talk to senior faculty about how it should look.
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tenured_feminist
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« Reply #5 on: May 07, 2012, 7:50:54 AM »

A few thoughts based on having been on a university-wide committee:

Distinguish clearly between published materials on the one hand and works in progress. Do not put anything that's in R&R or other stages of preparation in the same category as stuff that's (at a minimum) in page proofs.

If you have a book under advance contract, do not list it as under contract.

Clarify the conventions of your field for co-authorship either on your CV or as a supplementary note for your file. Some folks do this by putting an asterisk by the lead author.

Put everything in reverse chronological order.

If you're listing courses you've taught, also put the years in parentheses.

For grants and awards with money attached, be sure to list amounts, and clarify your role (i.e., PI, co-PI, etc.). If a grant is somewhat obscure, clarify whether it's internal or external, either on the CV or in your statement.
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glenwood
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« Reply #6 on: May 07, 2012, 8:07:44 AM »

My university does have a set format, but if it didn't and I wanted to play it safe, I'd emulate whatever my colleagues did when they got tenure.  Try to get a number of different examples so you can compare.  Also, double-check to see if there's not a preferred format (even if it's not required), since the main idea is to put your information out there where committees can easily find it.

My CV was complete and comprehensive (as required), even listing course I taught as a graduate student. octoprof and tee_bee are correct, everything you've done should be listed on the CV, probably, but your tenure dossier itself may contain only those materials that "count" -- e.g., courses taught, articles published, service rendered while at this school and during the tenure/promotion period.  Talk to senior faculty about how it should look.

This is the best advice. At my current university, the standards of my field are not the same as campus standards. I have now been formally scolded for failing to include things that, in my training, would be considered "padding your cv." I should never have assumed that I knew what the campus standards were and now I know better!

Don't assume that you can guess what they want at your university. Ask senior faculty, or ask the committee that will be reviewing your dossier.
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tenured_feminist
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« Reply #7 on: May 07, 2012, 8:45:47 AM »

My university does have a set format, but if it didn't and I wanted to play it safe, I'd emulate whatever my colleagues did when they got tenure.  Try to get a number of different examples so you can compare.  Also, double-check to see if there's not a preferred format (even if it's not required), since the main idea is to put your information out there where committees can easily find it.


This is the best advice. At my current university, the standards of my field are not the same as campus standards. I have now been formally scolded for failing to include things that, in my training, would be considered "padding your cv." I should never have assumed that I knew what the campus standards were and now I know better!

Don't assume that you can guess what they want at your university. Ask senior faculty, or ask the committee that will be reviewing your dossier.

And do this at the university, not the department, level. One example of what Glenwood is talking about is that here, tenure candidates are expected to list major grants that they didn't receive on their vitae. No one would put this on a CV meant for external consumption, but for the tenure process, even a grant that someone didn't get supposedly shows evidence of effort to comply with research standards.

It's doubly important to look outside your department for guidance if your chair and your chair's administrative person have not shepherded a few cases through in the last year or two.
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ruralguy
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« Reply #8 on: May 07, 2012, 1:18:29 PM »

1. Check the CV's of 5 or so recently tenured colleagues at your school, and compare to some general ones you see in your discipline.

2. Err on the side of clarity by having subsections (such as Peer Review Articles, Conference Proceedings, work submitted, etc.)
and also err on the side of at least a little bit of explanation in some places.

3. whatever others said about reverse chrono order, etc. That is best.

4. Avoid padding, but even if you feel the need to put in every thing, just be sure you have a proper category for it. I can forgive you listing every meeting you attended if you just put it under "Meetings Attended" (although I think that is an example of super-padding if you didn't present).
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flotsam
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« Reply #9 on: May 07, 2012, 8:24:41 PM »

I agree with all of this as well.  I probably should have added that, in attempting to be complete, you also should avoid the appearance of padding.  One way I do this is to use lots of subcategories (even if they're not officially part of my university set-format) to make things clear. 

Thus, e.g., I have a section on "Works not in print" that includes "forthcoming" and "under review" separately (so there's no confusion that, just because a piece was accepted or submitted, it has been published -- tenured_feminist is right, do not list as published anything not yet in print).  Also, realizing that some of my publications are not really at the level of peer-reviewed journal articles, but still deserve to be acknowledged, I have a category "Other Publications" that lists notes, encyclopedia entries, worthy blog-posts, etc.

Depending on what you'd need them for, it may be a good idea to maintain a few CVs.  tenured_feminist, right again, notes that you'd never want to list non-funded grant proposals for external readers (that'd be like listing rejected articles or proposed courses that you never taught), but for internal purposes, it shows effort.  Also, for some audiences, it might be worthwhile to highlight research, for others, teaching or service (and so on), so these alternate CVs could be useful.
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polly_mer
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« Reply #10 on: May 08, 2012, 8:01:00 AM »

Also, realizing that some of my publications are not really at the level of peer-reviewed journal articles, but still deserve to be acknowledged, I have a category "Other Publications" that lists notes, encyclopedia entries, worthy blog-posts, etc.

What is a worthy blog post?
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tinyzombie
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« Reply #11 on: May 08, 2012, 8:06:03 AM »

Also, realizing that some of my publications are not really at the level of peer-reviewed journal articles, but still deserve to be acknowledged, I have a category "Other Publications" that lists notes, encyclopedia entries, worthy blog-posts, etc.

What is a worthy blog post?

Blog posts on a CV? That sounds like including a self-published book.
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arizona
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« Reply #12 on: May 08, 2012, 8:16:26 AM »

Also, realizing that some of my publications are not really at the level of peer-reviewed journal articles, but still deserve to be acknowledged, I have a category "Other Publications" that lists notes, encyclopedia entries, worthy blog-posts, etc.

What is a worthy blog post?

Blog posts on a CV? That sounds like including a self-published book.

I think there are exceptions in some fields. I know at least one prof in a field that has pretty standard, widely read and well-regarded blogs, and professors will sometimes be invited to comment on recently published works and the like. The posts can then get cross-posted on other, well-regarded blogs, and they are seen as real contributions to the scholarly conversation.

But, no, I wouldn't list one's musings about the Jane Austen novel one read with one's book club.
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yellowtractor
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« Reply #13 on: May 08, 2012, 9:36:30 AM »

Also, realizing that some of my publications are not really at the level of peer-reviewed journal articles, but still deserve to be acknowledged, I have a category "Other Publications" that lists notes, encyclopedia entries, worthy blog-posts, etc.

What is a worthy blog post?

Blog posts on a CV? That sounds like including a self-published book.

I think there are exceptions in some fields. I know at least one prof in a field that has pretty standard, widely read and well-regarded blogs, and professors will sometimes be invited to comment on recently published works and the like. The posts can then get cross-posted on other, well-regarded blogs, and they are seen as real contributions to the scholarly conversation.

But, no, I wouldn't list one's musings about the Jane Austen novel one read with one's book club.

We've discussed this at great length on other threads.  The general consensus, as I recall, was that anything that was not peer-reviewed should not be listed as a "publication," in any way:  not blog posts, not letters-to-the-editor, no privately-printed memoir of one's grandmother who was a competitive badminton player in the 1920s, etc.

If one maintains a blog that has professional interest or standing, then the blog can (and probably should) go on the CV, either under "service" (some have argued) or in a separate category all its own.

YMMV, of course, and yes, there are disciplinary and institutional variations.  But the presumption in most fields is that "publications" are not only published; they are also peer-reviewed, in some form.
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flotsam
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« Reply #14 on: May 08, 2012, 12:29:12 PM »

Also, realizing that some of my publications are not really at the level of peer-reviewed journal articles, but still deserve to be acknowledged, I have a category "Other Publications" that lists notes, encyclopedia entries, worthy blog-posts, etc.

What is a worthy blog post?

I apologize, but I'm not really all that web-savvy, so perhaps there's a better term.  What I mean was something published online, but not on my personal site or anything like that. Specifically, my one "worthy blog post" on my CV is a brief article on a blog belonging to a publisher -- the publisher of one of my books -- and the post was an essay on the subject of my book, but involving research/analysis that did not make it into the book itself.  As such, it was a researched article in the humanities, closely related to my other work (hence, "worthy" of citing on my CV), but not blind-peer-reviewed or available in print.

If I wrote for them, I would perhaps include "Brainstorm" entries from the Chronicle blogs, but I understand that they are not very well researched. :)
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