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Author Topic: 50% of new college grads jobless  (Read 51675 times)
lucero
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« Reply #135 on: May 03, 2012, 8:49:12 PM »

I don't think it's so much that one needs college to do these jobs. I think it's that college creep--the absolute expectation that everyone go to collegeómeans that sometimes the people who have only HS degrees are less competent now than HS grads 30 years ago.  Then there were plenty of smart, competent people who didn't go on to college; now there are far fewer smart, competent people who give it a miss.

Absolutely. Both my grandmothers only had GEDs or h.s. diplomas but were very smart women. They both were well read, went to concerts, theatre, one liked classical music, took piano and voice lessons, etc. Books that they read for pleasure are what senior English majors in college whine about being too hard.

I also have worked as an assistant in the private sector and basically the assistant is the one holding down the fort. Many of these executives really depend on their assistants to handle EVERYTHING--travel, schedules, expense reports, presentations, etc. The assistant really needs to be on top of it all--one mistake could mess up a deal with a client or a potential client. I had no knowledge of the financial business and couldn't even read my TIAA-CREF before I left academia, but after just 4 months working as an assistant for a high net worth division, I could speak their language. It was an amazing learning experience. Some of the other assistants were college grads (probably 75%) and some of them working on their MBAs. And the company PAID for their education.That  may be less of the case nowadays--this was in the 1990s.

I have to make a disclaimer--I did have some good students this past year, but honestly a good number of them I would not want being my assistant if I were hiring--they can't even get their school work in on time. How would they be able to manage all the details for 1 or more executives?
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rock_in_the_road
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« Reply #136 on: May 13, 2012, 5:54:19 PM »

If 50% of graduates ARE JOBLESS, doesn't that indicate that the colleges ARE TEACHING THE WRONG STUFF?

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cc_alan
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« Reply #137 on: May 13, 2012, 7:25:52 PM »

If 50% of graduates ARE JOBLESS, doesn't that indicate that the colleges ARE TEACHING THE WRONG STUFF?

Only to 50 % of them. Besides, nobody expects a hitter to bat .500. "Only" .300 and you get to take the $$ home in a wheelbarrow. I'd like my wheelbarrow, please.

Alan
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polly_mer
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Have you worked on that project today?


« Reply #138 on: May 13, 2012, 7:34:54 PM »

If 50% of graduates ARE JOBLESS, doesn't that indicate that the colleges ARE TEACHING THE WRONG STUFF?



Nope, it merely indicates that half the people didn't learn the right stuff.
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lucero
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« Reply #139 on: May 13, 2012, 9:41:20 PM »

I think it is simplistic to blame it on either the students or the universities. The jobless rate is the same for college graduates in some European countries--for example in Spain. However, their system is to have students study and prepare for their profession as soon as they start university. Their economy is bad and they don't have enough jobs for h.s. grads (I think they have 25% unemployment) or college grads. One of the most popular careers in Spain is engineering and some of them are over here in the U.S. working or in Brazil, which is in need of high tech workers.

When I graduated college in the 1980s it was great to have a liberal arts degree. Nobody cared what you majored in. Every single person I knew from college had a job lined up when they graduated regardless of their major. It was always said that the companies would train you and they did. This is not happening anymore and at the same time there are more people in the workforce (women) and more college grads. The dumbing down of many college courses probably has not helped but turnout an incompetent workforce--unfortunately it is a lot easier to dumb down courses in the social sciences and the humanities than it is in STEM.

I do believe when students actually take rigorous courses in the liberal arts they are prepared to be trained and pick up work fast. However, when they have not taken rigorous classes and instead have done 6th grade work in the university then you have even worse than a h.s. grad in my opinion. At least a h.s. grad recognizes there is still much to learn and will try. With some of these college grads who haven't learned much in college, they think the learning is over and want to be making the big bucks already.
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kaysixteen
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« Reply #140 on: May 14, 2012, 2:46:26 PM »

And of course they see that they have little choice but to be earning the big bucks asap, in order to repay those expensive student loans they were exhorted to take out.
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spork
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« Reply #141 on: June 02, 2012, 8:52:09 PM »

The new metric of evaluating universities -- return on investment:

http://www.businessweek.com/interactive_reports/colleges_return_on_investment.html
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a.k.a. gum-chewing monkey in a Tufts University jacket

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octoprof
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Love your loved ones while you can.


WWW
« Reply #142 on: June 02, 2012, 10:17:32 PM »

The new metric of evaluating universities -- return on investment:

http://www.businessweek.com/interactive_reports/colleges_return_on_investment.html

That's not what return on investment means... Generally. How very odd.
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Love your neighbor.
spork
If you are reading this, I am naked.
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« Reply #143 on: June 03, 2012, 5:37:07 AM »

The new metric of evaluating universities -- return on investment:

http://www.businessweek.com/interactive_reports/colleges_return_on_investment.html

That's not what return on investment means... Generally. How very odd.

I don't understand what you mean. Here's the methodology for the numbers in the table:

http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2012-04-09/measuring-college-roi
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a.k.a. gum-chewing monkey in a Tufts University jacket

"There are no bad ideas, only great ideas that go horribly wrong."

"Please do not force people who are exhausted to take medication for hallucinations." -- Memo from the Chair, Department of White Privilege Studies, Fiork University
octoprof
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Love your loved ones while you can.


WWW
« Reply #144 on: June 03, 2012, 7:25:33 AM »

The new metric of evaluating universities -- return on investment:

http://www.businessweek.com/interactive_reports/colleges_return_on_investment.html

That's not what return on investment means... Generally. How very odd.

I don't understand what you mean. Here's the methodology for the numbers in the table:

http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2012-04-09/measuring-college-roi

A. That's a boatload of assumptions. I wish I only had to work 30 years, for example. " Only full-time employees who work in the U.S. were used for this analysis; self-employed, project-based, and contract employees were not. Graduates with advanced degrees were excluded." Wouldn't it be nice to know what percentage of grads (I.e. "investments") fall into these excluded categories?

B. ROI (a common metric used in business) is normally a simple annual percentage. So, a graduate of Harvey Mudd, on average, who is full time employed and not self employed (etc. etc.) has an ROI of 1,545,000%....? Is that what they mean here? I think not? "By subtracting the cost of attendance from the earnings differential, we learn the value of the degree for a graduate."

C. ROI doesn't mean what businessweek thinks it means. They calculated something, but I don't believe it is ROI.

D. These magazines must sell well whenever they rank universities.

E. Time vale of money?

F. Why only 1,248 institutions?

G. Many grains of salt.
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Love your neighbor.
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