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Author Topic: Chair knows from someone else  (Read 14539 times)
msparticularity
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Assistant Professor cum bricoleur


« Reply #15 on: March 13, 2012, 10:53:25 PM »

I'm kind of surprised that so many people consider bipolar a disability. I never would have thought about talking to the disabilities office about it, and I wouldn't consider myself disabled. (I am also bipolar, for anyone who doesn't know that already.) I'm not suggesting it's a bad idea to talk to the disabilities office, it's just something I hadn't thought about.

Chaos, I know from your posts on other threads that you definitely have effects of the BP1 that permeate your working life: inability to function consistently at certain times of day due to meds, etc. These are things that your supervisor has been quite sympathetic about, but you should realize that they are also covered disabilities. In the event, for example, that your supervisor later claimed not to have had a verbal agreement with you about this, or not to have realized how pervasive the issue would be, it might be very important for you to have had a file already. Seriously--get a file set up with your disabilities officer.
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"Once admit that the sole verifiable or fruitful object of knowledge is the particular set of changes that generate the object of study...and no intelligible question can be asked about what, by assumption, lies outside." John Dewey

"Be particular." Jill Conner Browne
chaosbydesign
"Are you alive?"
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Posts: 21,915

Whatever your problem is, it's probably my fault.


« Reply #16 on: March 13, 2012, 11:05:48 PM »

I'm kind of surprised that so many people consider bipolar a disability. I never would have thought about talking to the disabilities office about it, and I wouldn't consider myself disabled. (I am also bipolar, for anyone who doesn't know that already.) I'm not suggesting it's a bad idea to talk to the disabilities office, it's just something I hadn't thought about.

Chaos, I know from your posts on other threads that you definitely have effects of the BP1 that permeate your working life: inability to function consistently at certain times of day due to meds, etc. These are things that your supervisor has been quite sympathetic about, but you should realize that they are also covered disabilities. In the event, for example, that your supervisor later claimed not to have had a verbal agreement with you about this, or not to have realized how pervasive the issue would be, it might be very important for you to have had a file already. Seriously--get a file set up with your disabilities officer.

I think that once I've been taking the meds for longer, it won't be so much of an issue. They're not going to have an effect on my productivity in the lab, because I can do lab work any time of day and it won't matter if I work, say, 10-7 instead of 8-5. The only thing that they are having an effect on is my ability to get to, for example, an 8am class, or my ability to study in the evenings (my cognitive abilities are all f*cked up when I take the meds so I can't really read and internalize anything -- I probably have grammatical errors all over the place in my fora posts after I take them as well), so it's mainly coursework that they're affecting right now as opposed to lab productivity.

I understand why it's probably a good idea to set something up with the disabilities office as a precaution, but I don't want to do that. I'm not exactly sure why I don't want to at the moment, but I know that I don't. Probably something to do with my reluctance to accept that BP isn't something that I can control myself, and my tendency to blame myself entirely for anything the BP makes me do. I'm working on that. Maybe once I stop thinking of BP in that way, I'll be more willing to set up a file with the disabilities office.
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I am expressing multiple attitudes simultaneously sir. To which one are you referring? -- Spock
stringcheese
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« Reply #17 on: March 15, 2012, 8:51:03 PM »

I'm kind of surprised that so many people consider bipolar a disability. I never would have thought about talking to the disabilities office about it, and I wouldn't consider myself disabled. (I am also bipolar, for anyone who doesn't know that already.) I'm not suggesting it's a bad idea to talk to the disabilities office, it's just something I hadn't thought about.

In order to be a disability, it has to affect your major life activities.  Since Bipolar disorder is a "spectrum" disorder, there may be lots of people who are not affected.  Is it truly Bipolar or something else, I don't know.  I have read about people who have Bipolar and have no problems. Some claim not to need medicine. 

The Bipolar I know and have, requires a lot.  So, I think it depends on the severity of the illness.  I am a very classic "manic-depressive" and I don't consider myself disabled, but I do have to take a cocktail of heavy medications, goto therapy, eat well, get sleep (if possible), exercise, and be hospitalized when needed.  And even with all this, sometimes episodes occur and get out of control.

I have never talked to the disability office either.  But like you, I have a flexible schedule.

Have you read Kay Redfield Jamison?  Check out the third paragraph about being an assistant professor.
http://www.moodletter.com/KayRedfieldJamison.htm


Here is a link to some ADA information for people with Bipolar disorder. 
http://bipolar.about.com/od/ada/The_Americans_with_Disabilities_Act_ADA.htm

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chaosbydesign
"Are you alive?"
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Posts: 21,915

Whatever your problem is, it's probably my fault.


« Reply #18 on: March 15, 2012, 11:38:52 PM »

Yeah, I need medication. I didn't think I did, but... I do. I do crazy sh*t without medication and totally freaked myself and other people out last time I quit taking it.

Thanks for the links.
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I am expressing multiple attitudes simultaneously sir. To which one are you referring? -- Spock
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