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Author Topic: 2012 Tenure Track Cohort  (Read 184993 times)
anisogamy
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« Reply #15 on: February 21, 2012, 2:40:32 PM »

We're likewise house-hunting and have been discussing child care, but are leaning towards hiring some occasional help and juggling schedules rather than enrolling our son in a center (my spouse works from home).  We're a bit torn on buying our first house versus renting for a year.  If we rent, that would give us time to assess options and make sure we pick a neighborhood that suits us, but we haven't been able to come to any conclusions.  It doesn't help much that most rental options in the area are a bit on the crummy side because most people buy.  I'm a little alarmed at how much time my spouse has invested in scrutinizing online real estate listings (estimate: 4+ hours per day since I got the offer), but hopefully we'll be able to find something we can both be happy with.

From what I've heard, faculty meetings aren't supposed to be any fun, but I'm actually looking forward to finding out for myself as well.
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A little compassion is better than kicking people when they are down, regardless of who has suffered more and longer or whose bad job market has the biggest dick.
fraggles
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« Reply #16 on: February 21, 2012, 4:37:51 PM »

Anisogamy - my husband is doing the same thing. He is obsessed with trulia.com. (I'm not sure if your spouse has been to the location to which you're relocating; mine has not, and I think real estate websites are his way of wrapping his head around the fact that we're moving to a completely unfamiliar region of the country.) We're also having the same debate about our housing options. Interest rates and home prices are so low that it's really tempting to buy.
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guido6
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« Reply #17 on: February 21, 2012, 5:28:28 PM »

I posted earlier -- moving to take position in low cost-of-living area in South. We've decided to buy. We're going down in a couple months to choose a home! Housing is very inexpensive where we're moving, and we're tired of renting. Plus, we have kids. I've had a few "are we really ready to buy and is this a good idea" moments, but overall, I'm super excited and think it's the best thing to do in our situation. I do hate to think how we might feel if the job doesn't work out for whatever reason, or if I don't get tenure.
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scrabblin
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« Reply #18 on: February 21, 2012, 9:01:52 PM »

Just to share a problem I've already run into (TT positions to start in August for both me and spouse at same school - academic jackpot!):  Even though we're moving to a not-super-high-COL area, we're having issues getting mortgage lenders to take us seriously given our current incomes. Even with contracts in hand. One even said they needed to see our first paystubs before they can do anything for us.  Looking like we'll be renting for a year, even though we'd prefer to buy (and have some down payment $ ready for the purpose, too).  Everyone's situation is of course different, but just something to keep in mind.

Thanks for starting up this thread - and congrats to everyone on their jobs!
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guido6
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« Reply #19 on: February 21, 2012, 9:47:54 PM »

scrabblin, that stinks. We've been in touch with both an agent and lender, and so far so good. Got pre-qualified over the phone, and told that the offer letter and verification from the university would be enough -- no need for a pay stub. I hope this all works out and we're not crazy for doing this.
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fraggles
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« Reply #20 on: February 22, 2012, 8:17:29 AM »

Scrabblin - It might help to try to get pre-approved closer to your start date. The mortgage people I've spoken to have said they don't usually bother with people who are more than a month from buying. Plus, once you close on a purchase you have a pretty long gap (sometimes 6-8 weeks) before you make your first mortgage payment. With contract in hand in late June, you might get a different response because then you probably wouldn't be closing until late July/early August (or later if you find a short sale or foreclosure) and will have started receiving paychecks.

We're having the opposite problem - we need to get approved now while we can still show hubby's salary (I'm moving first,  he will eventually follow) because we're not sure when he will get a new job where we're going and don't know that we'd get approved on just my salary.
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anon99
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« Reply #21 on: February 22, 2012, 8:51:22 AM »

We're likewise house-hunting and have been discussing child care, but are leaning towards hiring some occasional help and juggling schedules rather than enrolling our son in a center (my spouse works from home). 

Word of warning, your first year will be busy and it may not be as easy to juggle schedules as you think.  First time teaching can take more time than you think and you will want (to try) to stay ahead.  Also if you are planning on working from home for part of the day, it may not be received well by some.  This will depend on your department, but mine would frown on a new hire not being on campus for a good part of the day.
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anisogamy
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« Reply #22 on: February 22, 2012, 9:39:04 AM »

We're likewise house-hunting and have been discussing child care, but are leaning towards hiring some occasional help and juggling schedules rather than enrolling our son in a center (my spouse works from home). 

Word of warning, your first year will be busy and it may not be as easy to juggle schedules as you think.  First time teaching can take more time than you think and you will want (to try) to stay ahead.  Also if you are planning on working from home for part of the day, it may not be received well by some.  This will depend on your department, but mine would frown on a new hire not being on campus for a good part of the day.

Thank you.  I phrased that poorly.  I work from home now, and it's hellish on me in terms of being able to get anything done with a grabby toddler in my lap.  I am planning on putting in serious facetime in my new position, and my spouse knows that.  The timing of his work is extremely flexible, with no external deadlines and no need to maintain anything close to a 9-5 schedule.  We're leaning towards him doing most of his work on evenings and weekends, with the possibility of hiring an afternoon babysitter a few times a week, but we'll have to see how it works out.  We did get a recommendation for a nice child care center near campus, but they have a months-long waiting list and we neither need nor could really financially justify something closer to full-time child care.
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A little compassion is better than kicking people when they are down, regardless of who has suffered more and longer or whose bad job market has the biggest dick.
merope
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« Reply #23 on: February 22, 2012, 10:26:47 AM »

Welcome and congratulations to scrabblin, guido6, fraggles, red_velvet, igrigous, militante, and anyone else I missed! This thread is really picking up steam!

I'm following the mortgage discussions with interest (no pun intended, though happily accepted). I'm also moving to a low COL area, where most of the rentals are geared to students, so the option of buying is very tempting. My situation is complicated by an international move, so there are only so many trips I can take to look at housing. No limits, though, to the amount of time I can spend on the internet drooling looking!

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The most intoxicating procrastination is time spent on a deceptively busy but unnecessary task that you can do well in order to avoid what you are not sure is good at all.
anisogamy
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« Reply #24 on: February 22, 2012, 11:21:27 AM »

Welcome and congratulations to scrabblin, guido6, fraggles, red_velvet, igrigous, militante, and anyone else I missed! This thread is really picking up steam!

It is, isn't it?  I'm excited by how our numbers on the thread have swelled so quickly!  I was expecting a slower trickle of new posters, but it looks like there are a lot of participants who are taking their recently hired status as an opportunity to delurk.  Welcome, all!

I'm following the mortgage discussions with interest (no pun intended, though happily accepted). I'm also moving to a low COL area, where most of the rentals are geared to students, so the option of buying is very tempting. My situation is complicated by an international move, so there are only so many trips I can take to look at housing. No limits, though, to the amount of time I can spend on the internet drooling looking!

I can definitely see how an international move would complicate things. We're starting to make plans to house-hunt in a few weeks, and to use our time while looking at properties in New City to determine whether we're really ready to buy or want to rent for the first year.  It is a low cost-of-living area—strikingly so in comparison to where we are now—so buying seems attractive on the surface, but we're still nervous and unsure.   
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A little compassion is better than kicking people when they are down, regardless of who has suffered more and longer or whose bad job market has the biggest dick.
wilderness_tips
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« Reply #25 on: February 22, 2012, 11:27:00 AM »

I'm a long-time lurker, but I'm happy to make my first post this one! Congratulations everybody!

I just accepted a TT job at an R1 in the South, and I'm thrilled. I'm in humanities, and the prospect of having a 2/2 load, with full support for my research, makes me giddy every time I think about it. After a very stressful application year, I'm literally getting lightheaded.

We're moving from the midwest, but as foreigners, partner and I have got a bit of chaos ahead of us in transferring out our visas from one institution to another. This may put a wrench in our househunting plans, but we're happily looking anyway -- the cost of an average house in our soon-to-be-town is about 25% of what the equivalent house would be in our home city, and we're giddy about that too. We're wilderness-tipping all over the place at the moment.
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red_velvet
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« Reply #26 on: February 22, 2012, 11:37:40 AM »

Welcome to the club, wilderness_tips and congratulations!

I would love to buy but would have to wait a year or two to sort out our visas situation and also to see if/when spouse finds a job in the New City. For now he's going to stay in our Current City to finish his contract.

But, like merope said, I'm following this discussion with a lot of interest, as I don't know anything about house buying. I guess watching HGTV does not make me an expert
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literatur45
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« Reply #27 on: February 22, 2012, 12:36:02 PM »

Congratulations to the 2012 cohort! I really have no business posting here, but I wanted to say that reading all the excited and happy posts brought back memories of how I felt last year when I got (and accepted) my offer. Thanks for bringing back good memories.
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red_velvet
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« Reply #28 on: February 22, 2012, 1:01:12 PM »

Congratulations to the 2012 cohort! I really have no business posting here, but I wanted to say that reading all the excited and happy posts brought back memories of how I felt last year when I got (and accepted) my offer. Thanks for bringing back good memories.

Actually, I think you should post again here. We need all the info we can get from someone who's already done that. Thanks for stopping by. How was your first year?
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chai35
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« Reply #29 on: February 22, 2012, 1:42:15 PM »

I had thought about buying too, mostly because COL in New City is SO LOW and interest rates are SO LOW.  But I decided against it.  I like the idea of getting to know the city and neighborhoods before I settle down.  Given the real estate market in the new city, I don't think resale would be easy, so saving more for a better (maybe forever) place is also appealing.  With my luck, I'd also use all of my savings as a down payment, only to have the furnace die the day after closing.

Doesn't mean I haven't found my dream home, which I look at online every day.

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