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Author Topic: moving To New Orleans  (Read 124483 times)
new resident
Guest
« on: May 17, 2006, 7:58:19 AM »

Where is the safest neighborhood in New Orleans? What are the rents like? What is the cost of living? I am used to a grad student stipend, and so, I am good at living on the cheap. But I also want to be in a safe neighborhood and near a one of the more or less safe leevees.

Please!!!!!!! No flames or insults or advice telling me Not to move here.
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DJ
Guest
« Reply #1 on: May 17, 2006, 8:31:54 AM »

You should be able to find the flood maps online, because parts of some neighborhoods are prone to flooding while other parts aren't.  Generally closer to the river=higher ground.  Look on the West Bank as well as the main city (for some reason, no one believes that people live on the West Bank, so they won't mention it, and it got much less damage than the East Bank during the storm.)  The suburbs, Uptown, Riverbend, as well as parts of the Warehouse district, the Garden District, Algiers Point, Marigny, and Gentilly tend to be safer, but this can go street-by-street and is also in flux.

As to which levee will be the next to go, who knows?  No guarantees.


It's really hard to predict rents because they rose a lot after Katrina, seemed to settle down a bit, but might rise again when there's an influx and they shut off the FEMA money, might bottom out with another hurricane, etc.  Because real estate, both renting and buying, is so variable, it's hard to make a blanket statement of cost of living.  One thing that is very expensive is insurance.  Both my car and renters' insurance tripled when I moved here.

Why are you coming to NoLa?  (As in, do you have a job?)
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IForgetMyName
Guest
« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2006, 8:32:47 AM »

I am sorry to say that prices have soared since the hurricane. Rents are high and insurance (particularly car insurance) was very expensive before the hurricane. It takes 30 days to get flood insurance so if you have any belongings, I would apply quickly after getting living accommodations. In terms of rents, I would look at the Gambit (bestofneworeans.com) and the nola.com site for their rental listings. Your choice of locations may depend on the University you are going to work at. Uptown (particularly between Magazine and Saint Charles) is a nice area but it is also expensive. There is also a forum on the nola.com site about safety.

I believe that critical and collegial talks need to be part of the conversation about current conditions in New Orleans. It seems important to consider living and working conditions in New Orleans after the loss of so many of our faculty and staff because of firings. We need to look at the policies that are being implemented before Higher Education Institutions across the US see the situation here as a form of permission to ignore or remove tenure and the accompanying forms of faculty governance. To talk critically and collegially about our situation does not mean that we love or hate New Orleans and Louisiana. It means that we care about our institutions, colleagues, students, and our own careers and ability to live.
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new resident
Guest
« Reply #3 on: May 17, 2006, 8:54:24 AM »

thanks. the insurance bit...i lived in baltimore and the car insurance was very high there. i paid nearly 2k a year. it was the highest in the nation i heard. and now i live in Northern  VA, and rents are skyhigh here. so is insurance. sooo.....i guess i will call my insurance co and ask.

the possible job is due to someone one leaving Suddenly, and not being fired. and it is only a VAP. but i am concerned about how faculty & staff are being treated. you are right that the truth needs to be appraised honestly.

i was told the salary ( roughly 40k) was non-negotiable but if i cannot afford to live there, then i guess i will have to turn it down. is that a doable salary? it is just me, and two cats. i don't want to share a place. been there. done that. hate it.
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IForgetMyName
Guest
« Reply #4 on: May 17, 2006, 9:19:40 AM »

I am not sure about the 40k. If I was looking to rent in New Orleans (and this always applies) I would make sure that my future residence does not flood. Certain streets and neighborhoods in New Orleans always flood (some to about knee or even thigh high) when it rains. This can mean that you car or your interior residence can flood—although not to the points seen after Katrina. I would check on the level of dampness in walls and make sure that there was not a high level of mold in the basement and other spaces. Residents of areas, faculty, and staff can be a resource in avoiding some of the flooding issues. I do wish you the best of luck.

[%sig%]
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Chem Guy
Guest
« Reply #5 on: May 17, 2006, 12:10:47 PM »

If you want to be safe, you need to move out to the burbs. Kettering is quite nice, and you can start to find reasonable prices if you are willing to have an hour commute. $40K is rather low; you will be on starvation wages.
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starving artist
Guest
« Reply #6 on: May 17, 2006, 12:39:57 PM »

starvation wages? i am on a grad student stipend now in one of the most expensive areas in the states. i cannot even afford to join the Y!

i guess it is relative. i need to jump start my career again. it is not long term, and so....
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To new resident
Guest
« Reply #7 on: May 17, 2006, 1:01:23 PM »

Try Metairie and Kenner, which are suburbs outside New Orleans (between downtown and the airport). Taxes are a little lower, car insurance is a little cheaper, and much of the area did not flood. I have lived in New Orleans for three years, and never experienced significant flooding before Katrina. It won't be more than a 30 min. commute to uptown or to UNO. I think 40k is definitely doable.
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In Louisiana
Guest
« Reply #8 on: May 17, 2006, 1:38:45 PM »

I think 40K is very doable. Metairie and Kenner (which must be what one of the posters meant by "Kettering") are less likely to flood, but they're also boring and soulless places. I would look for a place Uptown, on the river side of St. Charles Avenue, and preferably in a house that's up a few steps, not flush with the sidewalk. You can find rentals on craigslist.com. Considered a furnished sublet if you don't have much stuff.

[%sig%]
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UNO
Guest
« Reply #9 on: May 17, 2006, 6:58:47 PM »

It is not true that in Metairie and Kenner, "much of the area did not flood." Lots of those areas flooded, but for the wrong reasons... we have an idiot parish president who shipped pump operators 100 miles away and thus the pumps were not working.... hence huge parts of Metairie at least flooded that had never, ever flooded before. In contrast to what another poster said, Metairie - parts of it - is not soulless. However Kenner is indeed completely soulless.

Still, those who have recommended Uptown have it exactly right --- but do check flood maps carefully - you can get nice local segments through nola.com.
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anon
Guest
« Reply #10 on: May 18, 2006, 5:42:34 AM »

Don't live in the burbs. You will miss out on how lovely New Orleans is. Yes, there is crime, but if you've lived in a city, you will be fine. Live in Uptown. Rents have shot way up (I lived in the Garden District last year and paid 900 for two bedrooms, which is unheard of now in the same area), but you should be able to find a small place for under a thousand. I suggest that you visit and walk around to find a place. I was there about a month ago and I found several places in the Garden District for less than a thousand. It seems that the published announcements are higher that the places where landlords just post a sign in front of the available apartment. But let me repeat--do not live in the burbs!
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To new resident/UNO
Guest
« Reply #11 on: May 18, 2006, 7:14:41 AM »

What I meant is that there was significantly less flooding in Metairie than New Orleans. By the way, most of New Orleans also flooded for the wrong reasons because floodwalls were not designed properly (but I am sure you are aware of that).
I agree that uptown is great, but the nice areas such as the Garden District are expensive, and the more affordable places uptown can be a little sketchy (meaning hard to know for somebody from out of town). Mid-City is an option too, especially around Bayou St. John and the Fair Grounds. As for Metairie, there are some nice areas, such as Old Metairie. I just think if money is an issue, uptown may not be the best.
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anon
Guest
« Reply #12 on: May 18, 2006, 9:09:12 AM »

If you want to rent Uptown, check out riverlakeproperties.com. They accept pets, and have several one bedrooms in nice areas well under a thousand. You will have to adjust your standards a bit in New Orleans. Apartments that are considered "charming" will seem old and cruddy to some who aren't used to how Southerners celebrate decay.

I don't know what kind of property managers these people are, although they have always been helpful to me when I have considered their apartments (I never rented from them). But I had a horrible experience with my landlord--the worst of my life--and people had good things to say about him, so who knows. Renting in New Orleans can be a shady endeavor.
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former nola resident
Guest
« Reply #13 on: May 18, 2006, 9:38:12 AM »

I lived on st charles ave, river side, and LOVED it. It is definitely still ivable there and affordable on 40K, especially if you move one or two blocks off st charles toward the river--on Prytania St or any of hte cross streets (some are nicer than others).  I had friends who lived in the carollon/oak street area and got badly flooded out--charming and affordable but borderline safe, IMHO. My place on st charles was high and dry, cars too.  The thing about the whole st charles corridor is that it gives you access (via streetcar) to the WHOLE best parts of the city--one ride down to the arts district @ julia street; one ride uptown to tulane and audubon park; one ride down into the quarter and a quick walk over to the Marigny. So I felt I had the best of all possible worlds.  

I paid 1350 a month for a truly fabulous terrace penthouse apt, 1200 square feet, so spacious and with amazing views of city and river and bridges, plus security etc.  My friends paid way way less for rather lesser but still ood accomodations. If you simply drive around the garden district you will surely find something good. Craigslist.com is good in NOLA so try there too.  My penthouse apt was in a very nice bldg called 1750 St Charles that went condo alas, but they still might have things for you. I also know that the non penthouse apts in my bldg went for a lot less---in the 700/mo area. That includes utilities.  Give em a call--they should be in the book under Seventeen Fifty St charles.  There are also other highrises in the area on st charles, not as nice most of them.  I heard that 3000 st charles was a good bldg, also with things I had like security, covered parkinggarage, concierge, etc.  You CAn do this and will almost certainly have a good life there.

You will be fine. It is a GREAT city. I would go back in a second if I could, though the rest of Louisiana (I work in baton rouge, and just got another job out of state) is truly pretty horrible despite what the intrepid defender "In Louisiana" says.
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AF
Guest
« Reply #14 on: May 18, 2006, 10:16:13 AM »

Also, if you're having problems finding something, ask your new department.  Tulane runs an off-campus housing listserv and I imagine the other universities have something, at least informally.
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