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News: Talk online about your experiences as an adjunct, visiting assistant professor, postdoc, or other contract faculty member.
 
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Author Topic: Postdoc after Assistant Professorship?  (Read 10938 times)
soc2003
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« on: November 03, 2012, 8:18:31 AM »

Dear all,

I have a slightly strange question to ask: can one apply for a postdoctoral fellowship after having working at the assistant professorial levels for a couple of semesters. In my country it's easier to get an assistant professorship but I would like to eventually move abroad and do a postdoc.

Thank you very much in advance for your advice.

Best wishes
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lurkingfear
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« Reply #1 on: November 04, 2012, 11:55:21 AM »

I see this a lot in the sciences. Sometimes people even move abroad to do a PhD after holding a position at a university that only requires an MA/MS.
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mozman
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« Reply #2 on: November 04, 2012, 2:48:19 PM »

I have a post-doc right now who is a Full professor in China. He's been postdoc-ing in the USA for almost 10 years. When his kid goes to college in another couple years, he's going back to China to resume his position (apparently its waiting for him).

I've also commonly seen this with professors from Brazil, for some reason.
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Could you grow the foot into another patient? I mean, you are a scientist.
macadamia
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« Reply #3 on: November 04, 2012, 3:58:21 PM »

This depends on your country. I sure hope that you mean that you will take a temporary unpaid leave from your assistant professorship for the postdoc. In some places, this is actually encouraged.
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A drunk man will find his way home, but a drunk bird may get lost forever.  Shizuo Kakutani
oldfullprof
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Representation is not reproduction!


« Reply #4 on: November 04, 2012, 4:45:09 PM »

I tried to get Rand and NIH postdocs after six years as an assistant professor.  No go.  But it may have partly been my age (58) at the time.
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Taste o' the Sixties
youllneverwalkalone
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« Reply #5 on: November 04, 2012, 8:23:27 PM »

It depends to a high extent on what the conventions are in your country.

In my country, although we adopt academic titles from the US, we do not have the tenure-track system and therefore there are almost no tangible differences between post-docs and asst. professors (there are a few formal differences, but they are unrelated to seniority or possibility to land a full position). Therefore it is not uncommon that people are hired as post-docs after having been asst. prof. previously.
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kron3007
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« Reply #6 on: November 13, 2012, 10:34:22 AM »

Just to echo what has been said, I have seen this a lot.  We currently have someone who gave up an assistant professor position (they would not hold it) to come here to do a PhD. 
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mleok
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« Reply #7 on: December 20, 2012, 2:58:21 AM »

It depends on whether you're transferring from an assistant professorship to a postdoc within the same country. From what I understand, faculty positions in some Chinese universities only become tenure-track at the associate professor level, and I've seen many instances where it's possible to be an assistant professor without a PhD. So, if you're at a university where an assistant professorship is not tenure-track, or does not require a PhD and postdoctoral experience, then it's not that unusual to move back into a postdoctoral position.
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greyscale
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« Reply #8 on: December 20, 2012, 4:07:38 AM »

To add to the anecdotes: my labmate was an assistant professor in statistics at a good R1. She decided to retrain as a biologist and joined our lab as a postdoc. Technically, her job title was something like research scientist so that she could continue being PI of her existing small grant, but it was treated like a postdoc in all other ways. A few years after starting in our lab, she successfully got an NIH K99 grant, a transition grant that covers the last years of a postdoc and the first years of a faculty job.
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