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Author Topic: Degree on Business Cards  (Read 4419 times)
archimedes12
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« on: November 28, 2012, 4:48:28 PM »

I was always told, and this was reaffirmed in my last job, that your degree is not listed on your business card unless you have something higher than a master's degree. However, I am now seeing people at my current institution listing "MA" and "MS" on their business cards.  One coworker even listed his bachelor's degree (that's the highest degree he has). Doesn't this seem a little odd?
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galactic_hedgehog
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« Reply #1 on: November 28, 2012, 5:07:17 PM »

I would say it's institution-, or even department-, specific.  At my CC, I think the only people who put degrees on their cards are those with doctorates.  Though a bachelor's seems weird to me.
« Last Edit: November 28, 2012, 5:07:47 PM by galactic_hedgehog » Logged

flyingbison
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« Reply #2 on: November 28, 2012, 5:12:02 PM »

I was always told, and this was reaffirmed in my last job, that your degree is not listed on your business card unless you have something higher than a master's degree. However, I am now seeing people at my current institution listing "MA" and "MS" on their business cards.  One coworker even listed his bachelor's degree (that's the highest degree he has). Doesn't this seem a little odd?

Yes, it's odd (and silly) ... with a few exceptions for fields with a terminal master's degree.
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eefd2991
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« Reply #3 on: November 28, 2012, 5:26:27 PM »

I ran an A/B test and the physicians I work with take me more seriously when I put my MBA on my email signature.
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kron3007
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« Reply #4 on: November 28, 2012, 5:41:07 PM »

I think this would depend on the setting.  Within academia I could understand this being the case.  However, in the "real" world, even a BSc is a relevant qualification and I could see it being listed; why wouldn't it be?

 
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flyingbison
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« Reply #5 on: November 28, 2012, 5:49:44 PM »

I think this would depend on the setting.  Within academia I could understand this being the case.  However, in the "real" world, even a BSc is a relevant qualification and I could see it being listed; why wouldn't it be?

  

People don't usually list qualifications on a business card - they list titles, professional license/certifications, and sometimes degrees that indicate one's professional "status."  BA/BS, MA/MS don't indicate anything about one's profession.
« Last Edit: November 28, 2012, 5:51:06 PM by flyingbison » Logged

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cgfunmathguy
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« Reply #6 on: November 28, 2012, 6:41:24 PM »

I think this would depend on the setting.  Within academia I could understand this being the case.  However, in the "real" world, even a BSc is a relevant qualification and I could see it being listed; why wouldn't it be?

  

People don't usually list qualifications on a business card - they list titles, professional license/certifications, and sometimes degrees that indicate one's professional "status."  BA/BS, MA/MS don't indicate anything about one's profession.
To be honest, neither does PhD, EdD, or DBA.
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flyingbison
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« Reply #7 on: November 28, 2012, 10:02:49 PM »

I think this would depend on the setting.  Within academia I could understand this being the case.  However, in the "real" world, even a BSc is a relevant qualification and I could see it being listed; why wouldn't it be?

  

People don't usually list qualifications on a business card - they list titles, professional license/certifications, and sometimes degrees that indicate one's professional "status."  BA/BS, MA/MS don't indicate anything about one's profession.
To be honest, neither does PhD, EdD, or DBA.

I agree.  I think those who list a doctoral degree on a business card are mostly doing so to indicate to others how they want to be addressed (Dr So-and-so)
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aandsdean
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« Reply #8 on: November 28, 2012, 10:11:52 PM »

I think this would depend on the setting.  Within academia I could understand this being the case.  However, in the "real" world, even a BSc is a relevant qualification and I could see it being listed; why wouldn't it be?

  

People don't usually list qualifications on a business card - they list titles, professional license/certifications, and sometimes degrees that indicate one's professional "status."  BA/BS, MA/MS don't indicate anything about one's profession.
To be honest, neither does PhD, EdD, or DBA.

I agree.  I think those who list a doctoral degree on a business card are mostly doing so to indicate to others how they want to be addressed (Dr So-and-so)

Mine says AandSDean, Ph.D., NOT because I want to be addressed as "Dr." (which I don't), but because it's my school's house style, and because I mostly use my cards while traveling to countries where having a Ph.D. actually matters to my ability to get things done (such as meetings with bigwigs).

I HATE being called "Dr."
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cgfunmathguy
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« Reply #9 on: November 28, 2012, 10:45:20 PM »

I think this would depend on the setting.  Within academia I could understand this being the case.  However, in the "real" world, even a BSc is a relevant qualification and I could see it being listed; why wouldn't it be?

  

People don't usually list qualifications on a business card - they list titles, professional license/certifications, and sometimes degrees that indicate one's professional "status."  BA/BS, MA/MS don't indicate anything about one's profession.
To be honest, neither does PhD, EdD, or DBA.

I agree.  I think those who list a doctoral degree on a business card are mostly doing so to indicate to others how they want to be addressed (Dr So-and-so)

Mine says AandSDean, Ph.D., NOT because I want to be addressed as "Dr." (which I don't), but because it's my school's house style, and because I mostly use my cards while traveling to countries where having a Ph.D. actually matters to my ability to get things done (such as meetings with bigwigs).

I HATE being called "Dr."
A fair point. I'm grumpy because I'm still grading. Thus, I'm not really thinking beyond step one tonight. My apologies for that.
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galactic_hedgehog
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« Reply #10 on: November 28, 2012, 11:51:47 PM »

I HATE being called "Dr."

Can we call you Shirley?
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aandsdean
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« Reply #11 on: November 29, 2012, 11:04:06 AM »

I HATE being called "Dr."

Can we call you Shirley?

As I once said to my students, "You can call me anything you want as long as it's not 'Sh*thead," to which one replied, "What about a**hole?"

I loved that kid.
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usukprof
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« Reply #12 on: November 29, 2012, 1:04:51 PM »

I think this would depend on the setting.  Within academia I could understand this being the case.  However, in the "real" world, even a BSc is a relevant qualification and I could see it being listed; why wouldn't it be?

  

People don't usually list qualifications on a business card - they list titles, professional license/certifications, and sometimes degrees that indicate one's professional "status."  BA/BS, MA/MS don't indicate anything about one's profession.
To be honest, neither does PhD, EdD, or DBA.

I agree.  I think those who list a doctoral degree on a business card are mostly doing so to indicate to others how they want to be addressed (Dr So-and-so)

Mine says AandSDean, Ph.D., NOT because I want to be addressed as "Dr." (which I don't), but because it's my school's house style, and because I mostly use my cards while traveling to countries where having a Ph.D. actually matters to my ability to get things done (such as meetings with bigwigs).

I HATE being called "Dr."

Same here.  The US side of my card is of the form USUKprof, DSc.  But I would have fought the style of Dr. USUKprof.  On the other hand, the UK side is of the form Professor USUKprof, also in the local style, but lecturers are pretended with Dr.

My graduate students call my by my first name.
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prytania3
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« Reply #13 on: November 29, 2012, 2:38:28 PM »

I think this would depend on the setting.  Within academia I could understand this being the case.  However, in the "real" world, even a BSc is a relevant qualification and I could see it being listed; why wouldn't it be?

 

Because it's corny. That's why.
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michigander
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« Reply #14 on: November 29, 2012, 10:28:39 PM »

I go with field specific.  My significant other's cards read: Name, R.N., M.S.N. (as do all of his colleagues' cards).  In my former fields of student affairs and academic advising, I've never used any letters after my name.
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