• February 5, 2016

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February 05, 2016, 6:24:38 pm *
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News: Talk online about your experiences as an adjunct, visiting assistant professor, postdoc, or other contract faculty member.
 
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 1 
 on: Today at 06:19:32 pm 
Started by mountainguy - Last post by leobloom
If other SCCs are also going to balk at the >$1K airfare like you do, then I'm pretty much fvcked. That's just how it is right here, and I'm not making $h|t up. Now do you understand why I am applying out?


 2 
 on: Today at 06:19:15 pm 
Started by clean - Last post by zombie_librarian
Deadpool and The Walking Dead. There may also be candy.

What can I say: We're just super romantic.

 3 
 on: Today at 06:11:55 pm 
Started by treehugger1 - Last post by treehugger1
Why not just say that you'd be glad to donate to the college fund for her HS graduation gift, her birthdays, and any other holidays in which you would normally give a gift. Then just give whatever you can afford and what seems appropriate for the occasion. You can do this for nephew too.

My kids' 529 accounts have a feature where I can email relatives a link to a page where they can direct deposit into their accounts and write a nice note. I only give this out to people who have asked about it ahead of time, which is really just their grandparents.

If they are not satisfied this offer, then you can't win. You shouldn't need to go into all these reasons, regardless of whether or not they like your offer. These reasons are valid, but they're nobody's business and might make it seem more like a negotiation rather than your decision. And it shouldn't be a negotiation--just state what you plan to do.

I really like the present idea. I'll have to look into this.

Don't worry. With that list I was just thinking out loud/communicating with forumites. Most of what I included I wouldn't bring up with Mom and sis.

 4 
 on: Today at 06:02:37 pm 
Started by stagolee - Last post by writingprof
Appreciate the responses.

I have never used the Chair as a reference but that has not prevented back channel contact.  My references have vouched for me as a scholar/colleague and been laudatory of my candidacy but the market is such that any red flag burns pretty bright.

I've given the pc version of my tenure denial but on three previous trips down the aisle cold feet set in.  Once after being recommended for hire I had to interview with the academic VP who asked point blank why was I denied tenure.  Nodded and smiled during my explanation but overturned the recommendation...and I didn't hear of it until months later from the head of the search committee.

I'm slightly confused by your last paragraph, but, if I'm reading correctly, you've been burned not only by your tenure denial but also by other universities who didn't buy your explanation of said denial.  If that's the case, then it's proof that you badly need a recommendation letter from a supportive former colleague at Tenure Denial U. who will explain your situation in the best possible light. 

 5 
 on: Today at 05:52:32 pm 
Started by apple1234 - Last post by apple1234
I got a response finally. It'll be here soon and seems like I will have time to work on it. = )

 6 
 on: Today at 05:51:38 pm 
Started by pathogen - Last post by metaphd

Was their postdoc adviser the one telling them this? The only reason I could imagine someone giving this advice is if that someone had an ulterior motive for wanting the postdoc to not spend any time on old stuff. Because it is really awful advice.

I had the same thought. The postdoc should definitely publish their dissertation research- even if it has to be on their own time if their advisor doesn't want them working on it as part of their postdoc hours.

 7 
 on: Today at 05:46:00 pm 
Started by treehugger1 - Last post by zuzu_
Why not just say that you'd be glad to donate to the college fund for her HS graduation gift, her birthdays, and any other holidays in which you would normally give a gift. Then just give whatever you can afford and what seems appropriate for the occasion. You can do this for nephew too.

My kids' 529 accounts have a feature where I can email relatives a link to a page where they can direct deposit into their accounts and write a nice note. I only give this out to people who have asked about it ahead of time, which is really just their grandparents.

If they are not satisfied this offer, then you can't win. You shouldn't need to go into all these reasons, regardless of whether or not they like your offer. These reasons are valid, but they're nobody's business and might make it seem more like a negotiation rather than your decision. And it shouldn't be a negotiation--just state what you plan to do.

 8 
 on: Today at 05:44:16 pm 
Started by stagolee - Last post by stagolee
Appreciate the responses.

I have never used the Chair as a reference but that has not prevented back channel contact.  My references have vouched for me as a scholar/colleague and been laudatory of my candidacy but the market is such that any red flag burns pretty bright.

I've given the pc version of my tenure denial but on three previous trips down the aisle cold feet set in.  Once after being recommended for hire I had to interview with the academic VP who asked point blank why was I denied tenure.  Nodded and smiled during my explanation but overturned the recommendation...and I didn't hear of it until months later from the head of the search committee.

 9 
 on: Today at 05:43:40 pm 
Started by octoprof - Last post by metaphd
Why, dear student, did you a) send an email the day of class asking if there was class that night (um, yes- and if in doubt, check the syllabus!); b) email this question only to my TA if you were that concerned? and c) why did you not bother to come to class?  (And no- using the excuse "I didn't know we had class because TA didn't tell me until after class ended" will not work). You have missed 2 of the first 3 classes this semester!

 10 
 on: Today at 05:41:17 pm 
Started by treehugger1 - Last post by ursula
A simple "No, I'm not able to do that" should suffice.  If they ask why, a good Queen Victoria glare should shut them down.  You don't owe explanations, and if you did offer any you could be met with counter-arguments, meant to convince you that you really can help.

My sister and her husband used to ask me for money on a regular basis, even when I was a part-time instructor.  I always said no.  Then they asked me to co-sign a car loan for them (when we couldn't afford a car ourselves).  I said no.  I kept saying no, and offering no explanations, until they stopped asking.

Now that Spousal Unit and I are more affluent, we do subsidize tuition for one niece, because she's very, very smart, her parents don't make very much money, and they would never, ever ask for help.  We volunteered it.

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