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Author Topic: Universiti Brunei Darussalam  (Read 378290 times)
lurking_sprirt
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« Reply #60 on: March 22, 2012, 9:10:54 PM »

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Time to change outmoded ways of thinking.

Putting in something with substance is outmoded at UBD because it takes too much time. 2015 is round the corner and the university needs the sacred numbers quick - a few shortcuts taught as part of the re-training - 'strategies' to churn out publication: why have only one author to one article? Have 6 names instead. NUS does that. Why spend money on permanent academic positions? Invite someone who already has a long list of publications to come on-short term basis so you can borrow his/her publication and citation track record (may be something learned from NUS as well). Academics run out of ideas for publication - take your research students' work and publish with your name tied to theirs (also a trick brought over from NUS?). There are many ways. Why are UBD academics so slow to catch these tricks... sorry, strategies?
« Last Edit: March 22, 2012, 9:14:17 PM by lurking_sprirt » Logged
tong_in_cheek
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« Reply #61 on: March 22, 2012, 9:30:44 PM »

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why have only one author to one article? Have 6 names instead. NUS does that. Why spend money on permanent academic positions? Invite someone who already has a long list of publications to come on-short term basis so you can borrow his/her publication and citation track record (may be something learned from NUS as well). Academics run out of ideas for publication - take your research students' work and publish with your name tied to theirs (also a trick brought over from NUS?). There are many ways

Thanks, some excellent suggestions. If you have any more please PM me directly.
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meragang
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« Reply #62 on: March 23, 2012, 1:52:25 AM »

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If you do not want to get re-trained, how do you expect UBD to find any use in you? Time to change outmoded ways of thinking.

Like academics everywhere, most staff at UBD have undergone years or decades of training in specialist areas, and would be happy to contribute their expertise to the development of a productive regional research university. But this expertise is constantly squandered or scorned by an ADD-driven administrative culture that values gimmicky consultancies and the "wow" factor of world rankings over solid, painstaking but unspectacular research.

The idea that the academic staff could be meaningfully "re-trained" by taking three weeks of content-free leadership courses is risible, and simply highlights the yawning gulf between bureaucratic and academic notions of "expertise", between political re-education and critical enquiry. This would perhaps be a harmless administrative conceit if it were not for the fact that it threatens UBD's core function, which is to create academic expertise.
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valueadded
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« Reply #63 on: March 23, 2012, 8:02:13 PM »

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most staff at UBD have undergone years or decades of training in specialist areas, and would be happy to contribute their expertise to the development of a productive regional research university

This is the problem with many UBD staff. Instead of exploring new scientific areas, they want to remain as narrow specialists. In this day and age, we need people who go beyond the tunnel vision of their cosy disciplines and can engage in trans- and cross-disciplinary teaching and research that are able to add value to conventional knowledge production. Just look at research programmes and teaching curriculums at top-ranking universities, such as Harvard or Oxford. We can't afford to become a university of dinosaurs, so come out of your cocoon.
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lurking_sprirt
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« Reply #64 on: March 23, 2012, 10:08:54 PM »

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they want to remain as narrow specialists. In this day and age, we need people who go beyond the tunnel vision of their cosy disciplines and can engage in trans- and cross-disciplinary teaching and research that are able to add value to conventional knowledge production.

Introducing an inter-disciplinary or cross-disciplinary push in order to do away with fossilized disciplines is an oxy-moron in and of itself. It reflects that the Dear Leaders and their sidekicks have no clue what any of these mean - cross-disciplinary, inter-disciplinary - apart from introducing in an irresponsible manner an 'anything goes' and 'now everyone can teach anything' attitude towards the development of academic programmes and research at the university.
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iacocoa
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« Reply #65 on: March 23, 2012, 10:24:09 PM »

I think we all understand that standing still is not an option for UBD, we have to adapt, change and move ahead. To engage with change one needs a direction and a destination - a vision - as well as a map to get there - a strategic plan. UBD has decided on its vision and is now in the process of implementing strategies to achieve it.

Over the last three years much has already been achieved with the introduction of the innovative, interdisciplinary GenNext undergraduate programmes, the Discovery Year that equips students with a variety of skills and experiences directly relevant to the labour market, as well as the establishment of new research centres and institutes with a regional and international profile, including in Islamic Studies, Asian Studies, Energy Studies, Biodiversity Research, Policy Studies, the UBD-IBM IT Centre, and others still under consideration. The bottom line is that so far some two-thirds of targets have already been achieved.

The far-fetched and shallow sophistry from detractors of the UBD 2015 vision one reads on this thread is typical of precisely the kind of ivory tower arrogance that we need to overcome to push UBD ahead. Those who feel that they cannot identify with the visions of the university should perhaps be respectfully advised to consider alternative career options rather than undermine the progress of the university. We need to synergise rather than  dissipate our energies in multiple direction through the pursuit of individual agendas.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2012, 10:27:26 PM by iacocoa » Logged
qrypt
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I just LOVE that VOICE. It's so NICE


« Reply #66 on: March 24, 2012, 3:24:47 AM »

Ah -- but don't forget about the profound difference between trans-disciplinary approaches and cross-disciplinary approaches. 

Make the wrong choice here and you're doomed. 
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"Kick ass! If somebody tries to stop the march to democracy, we will seek them out and kill them! Our will is being tested, but we are resolute. We have a better way. Stay strong! Stay the course! Kill them! Be confident! We are going to wipe them out! We are not blinking!"
meragang
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« Reply #67 on: March 24, 2012, 6:23:51 AM »

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Quote
most staff at UBD have undergone years or decades of training in specialist areas, and would be happy to contribute their expertise to the development of a productive regional research university

This is the problem with many UBD staff. Instead of exploring new scientific areas, they want to remain as narrow specialists.

LOL - Perhaps if I had written "most staff at UBD have undergone less than three years of academic training, and are not happy to contribute their expertise to the development of the university" this would have met with valueadded's approval. At least they wouldn't be "dinosaurs", merely uneducated (which is clearly the lesser sin of the two).
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obelisk
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« Reply #68 on: March 24, 2012, 9:59:48 AM »

The really funny thing is though that after having attended a university for a while many people are still uneducated and incapable of formulating much less defending an opinion.
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valueadded
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« Reply #69 on: March 24, 2012, 8:34:41 PM »

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Ah -- but don't forget about the profound difference between trans-disciplinary approaches and cross-disciplinary approaches.
Quote

Ah. Typical ivory tower pedanticalness.
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tinyzombie
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elevate from this point on - chuck d


« Reply #70 on: March 24, 2012, 8:45:00 PM »

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Ah -- but don't forget about the profound difference between trans-disciplinary approaches and cross-disciplinary approaches.
Quote

Ah. Typical ivory tower pedanticalness.

This is the funniest post I've ever read.
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proudhon
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« Reply #71 on: March 24, 2012, 8:55:59 PM »

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“Leadership is all hype. We’ve had three great leaders in this century – Hitler, Stalin, and Mao.... They were mis-leaders.”

Talking of Chairman Mao, are there eerie parallels between the Quantum Leap to ”UBD 2015 - Top 50 in Asia" and Mao's Great Leap Forward in 1958? The party leadership dreams up a vision and pushes its implementation down the hierarchy. The middle rungs of the party are reluctant to report problems and failures to the top leadership. The people at the bottom suffer while the top leadership remains incommunicado in their bunker. A textbook failure of communication or am I imagining things?

One shouldn't throw political leaders (such as Mao) and corporate leaders (a la Tichy) together. It's well-known that  - contrary to appearances -  groups with low-profile, open leadership out-perform groups with high-profile, domineering leaders because open styles of leadership that incorporate a diversity of opinions encourage creativity and innovation, whereas domineering leadership styles stifle communication and restrict their flexibility and adaptability. That's why domineering-narcissistic leadership style usually don't make it in the corporate world and gravitate towards politics, where the bottom line is not effectiveness in achieving targets, but the ability to mobilize support and discipline followers. In this context universities are clearly highly politicized environments, full of people with strong convictions for which they are willing to make a stand, some of whom trying to re-invent themselves as politicians.
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culture_jammer
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« Reply #72 on: March 24, 2012, 11:10:47 PM »


It seems rather out of character for such a forward-looking and future-oriented ("UBD: Tomorrow, Today!") management to choose the 1970s as the theme for last night's annual dinner. Perhaps a more enthusiastic crowd of academic staff would have attended if the theme had been 2015?  :)
 
As it were, an event that is intended to pull the university community together turned out to be a manifestation of the lacklustre and divisive mood that pervades the campus. Even the CEO delegated his usual speech to his No.3 and The Bee Gees clearly outshined the BGs.
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olddrone
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« Reply #73 on: March 25, 2012, 8:41:05 AM »

"Over the last three years much has already been achieved with the introduction of the innovative, interdisciplinary GenNext undergraduate programmes, the Discovery Year that equips students with a variety of skills and experiences directly relevant to the labour market, as well as the establishment of new research centres and institutes with a regional and international profile, including in Islamic Studies, Asian Studies, Energy Studies, Biodiversity Research, Policy Studies, the UBD-IBM IT Centre, and others still under consideration. The bottom line is that so far some two-thirds of targets have already been achieved."

The brilliant paragraph above set off my BS detector (so did Cross- and Trans-Interdisciplinary mumbo jumbo).  Ask Hemingway why.
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olddrone
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« Reply #74 on: March 25, 2012, 8:48:19 AM »

"Over the last three years much has already been achieved with the introduction of the innovative, interdisciplinary GenNext undergraduate programmes, the Discovery Year that equips students with a variety of skills and experiences directly relevant to the labour market, as well as the establishment of new research centres and institutes with a regional and international profile, including in Islamic Studies, Asian Studies, Energy Studies, Biodiversity Research, Policy Studies, the UBD-IBM IT Centre, and others still under consideration. The bottom line is that so far some two-thirds of targets have already been achieved."

The brilliant paragraph above set off my BS detector (so did Cross- and Trans-Interdisciplinary mumbo jumbo).  Ask Hemingway why.

Frankly, if this school has achieved such greatness, you do not need to appear here and TELL it is so.  A great school will not need such hyperbole but will SHOW in real life through hard evidence.  

Alas, I have never heard of this beanery ever.  Claim all you want as you need to get your hot, empty air out.

Please, Moderator, delete the above post.
« Last Edit: March 25, 2012, 8:50:04 AM by olddrone » Logged
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