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News: Talk about how to cope with chronic illness, disability, and other health issues in the academic workplace.
 
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 1 
 on: Today at 01:40:09 pm 
Started by crazybatlady - Last post by economizer

Bachelor Senior Dinner 2016 v.104

McWaldawg Salad

1.  Go to Walmart deli and by a couple of Corn Dogs
2.  On the way home drive thru McDonalds and by a "dinner salad

Then,

3.  Nuke one the Dogs until more than warm, and remove the shaft/handle within
4. Take the lid off the salad and add some sliced cucumber/onion, etc.
5.  Make triangular chunks of the corn dog, put them on the salad, and douse said salad with the dressing of your choice.

If one chooses to invite a dinner guest, have them bring their own salad [and dressing of choice], you've already got a corn dog for them

Enjoy with iced tea

The only thing missing from the dinner is "u", and you.  My apologies.

 2 
 on: Today at 01:31:33 pm 
Started by tijuanafina - Last post by mystictechgal
Maybe it's different in academia, but my business background makes me suspect that if you really have a body of heavy hitters in the field, but don't already have a specialized academic group in place, there is a reason. That reason is likely because all of those heavy hitters know how much work putting something like this together would be and they chose (and continue to choose) to expend their time and effort on more lucrative (personally and professionally) endeavors. My guess is that, if approached about the idea, many will be quite encouraging--after all, once it's in place it will likely benefit them, too. Some might even agree to "help". But, beware. They didn't get to be big names by spending their time benefitting others; they saw to their own careers, first. You need to see to yours, especially as you're just starting out.

Is the time you will spend on this really going to be more beneficial to you than spending time on your own research, service to your own university, and teaching obligations? It won't run itself once it's up. At least in the beginning, if you spearhead it, you're "it". What happens if you get a little further along and need to step back for the sake of your own career? While your professional profile might go up if it's all a resounding success, your name will also be linked to it if it fails. Think, also, about the politics involved in something of this nature. Right now, it sounds like you're on good terms with the senior members of your field. Will that continue to be true if you end up in the middle of two of them who disagree about policies or direction? If one or more of them agree to help and fail at follow-through, you're probably not in a position to do much of anything about it--and, if others expecting it to happen look to you for reasons why it hasn't, pointing fingers at a senior colleague isn't really a recommended option.

As I said, maybe none of these are concerns in academic circles, but they would be in the business/tech circles I ran in. From reading here, I suspect academia isn't that much different--in fact, I think the stakes might even be higher. It sounds like you already know and talk with each other. I'd think seriously about the suggestions you've received about less formalized ways to meet as a sub-group, whether that be sub-conferencing at a larger meeting (formally, or at a sub-group dinner), hosting the occasional sub-group conference of your own, or starting a FB page or listserv. Seems like a lot less work (for everyone), with fewer pitfalls and potential downside consequences (for you).

 3 
 on: Today at 01:30:58 pm 
Started by zuzu_ - Last post by zuzu_
I thought about asking for an extension, but things aren't going to get any easier for me until after I defend my diss this Fall. (And I'm also teaching six courses this Fall.) I could do these revisions in two days. I just don't want to spend two days expending mental and emotional energy on this right now. And there's really no external reason I have to. Better spend it working on my summer classes and working on the diss. And playing My Little Pony with my kid.

 4 
 on: Today at 01:27:07 pm 
Started by voxprincipalis - Last post by San_Joaquin
Sure you're not glossing over something that's not really finished?

 5 
 on: Today at 01:16:11 pm 
Started by zuzu_ - Last post by indium
I think this is mostly a vent but advice is welcome.

I think I just need to give up on an article. I did one extensive R & R on an article and resubmitted. It got a second R & R with more extensive comments (to be fair, there is a new editor). It's due in two days. I think I need to give it up.

The reviewers were great. Their advice is correct. And they gave lots of positive feedback too. But I'm just so sick of this article. It has a few excellent moments, and it's about  something I really care about, but mostly it's just meh. I've been working on it for three years.

This summer, I'm writing my dissertation and teaching three classes. No one at my job cares if I publish--there is no external pressure. Can I just give up? Maybe I'll revise and submit somewhere else when the diss is done, if I feel like it. That's OK, right?
It is OK if you are OK with that. If it were me, I would contact the editor, ask for an extension and then try to get it done somehow. Nothing worse than to regret not publishing it. This is your baby (as it sounds).

I had a few papers like that. I call them boomerang papers because they keep returning with more work to do. One of them was especially dreadful with more and more revisions every time (kind of like yours). In the end I hated it so much but after 2 years of revisions it is published in a decent journal and gets cited. Now I like it and I am happy I kept revising it.

 6 
 on: Today at 01:14:25 pm 
Started by zuzu_ - Last post by srpd14
I just re-submitted an article that I am also sick of and have been working on in one form or another for years, and which I think may well get another R&R in response - it's an ambitious and tough to pull off argument. I almost gave it up this month and decided to put in a couple long days revising it and give it another shot (I did get an extension on the re-submission).

I think it's totally fine to give it up for now, revise and submit elsewhere later. Keep the helpful feedback, take a break, go back to it later with a fresh perspective (if you want to).

 7 
 on: Today at 12:55:33 pm 
Started by bren1851 - Last post by gsawpenny
Another factor might be your "academic age." I will assume that you finished your doctorate about 3 years ago as that is how long you have been in the ranks. Hiring committees are, tragically, often like children and run off after the next bright and shiny thing they see.  In your case, not only is your scholarship "old," but apparently not even worth publication.

Oddly enough I have seen this at the oddest times. I once watched some colleagues start a search for an "expert" in Public History with experience in museums. By the time they hired, they left on the floor a number of highly experienced practitioners and hired a bright young thing with an interesting dissertation and not a moment of actual operational experience.

If you missed getting an interview this year I recommend, without malice, that you hang tight to your adjunct hours...or look for a new line of work. 

 8 
 on: Today at 12:53:38 pm 
Started by poiuy - Last post by marshwiggle
I read the Wash Post article carefully, and this doesn't sound like "facilitated communication", at least not the sort that rightfully deserves the scorn that commenters here are giving it. She's just holding up the keyboard to him, not holding onto his arm in any way that could direct his finger to certain keys, as is the case with FC.

That was my take too. I think it is rapid prompting. I know little about this, but:

http://www.halo-soma.org/learning_faqs.php

Q.

The main issue for me is that if it is truly the child now communicating, then the facilitator would not even need to be in the room, let alone holding the keyboard. The simple acts of a) being in the child's field of vision, and b) holding the device on which the child will be typing, allows a lot of possibilities for body language cues and facilitator influence.
Or, alternatively, have the facilitator prevented from hearing or seeing the questions being asked. If she needs to help him type, it shouldn't matter that she has no idea what he's supposed to be typing about.

Quote
In instances like these, the minute the facilitator leaves the room the child becomes totally non-communicative again. That strongly suggests that it isn't the child communicating in the first place.
And the strong desire of everyone involved to see it work makes everyone biased to believe it.

 9 
 on: Today at 12:44:57 pm 
Started by zuzu_ - Last post by zuzu_
I think this is mostly a vent but advice is welcome.

I think I just need to give up on an article. I did one extensive R & R on an article and resubmitted. It got a second R & R with more extensive comments (to be fair, there is a new editor). It's due in two days. I think I need to give it up.

The reviewers were great. Their advice is correct. And they gave lots of positive feedback too. But I'm just so sick of this article. It has a few excellent moments, and it's about  something I really care about, but mostly it's just meh. I've been working on it for three years.

This summer, I'm writing my dissertation and teaching three classes. No one at my job cares if I publish--there is no external pressure. Can I just give up? Maybe I'll revise and submit somewhere else when the diss is done, if I feel like it. That's OK, right?

 10 
 on: Today at 12:42:33 pm 
Started by poiuy - Last post by prof_twocents
I read the Wash Post article carefully, and this doesn't sound like "facilitated communication", at least not the sort that rightfully deserves the scorn that commenters here are giving it. She's just holding up the keyboard to him, not holding onto his arm in any way that could direct his finger to certain keys, as is the case with FC.

That was my take too. I think it is rapid prompting. I know little about this, but:

http://www.halo-soma.org/learning_faqs.php

Q.

The main issue for me is that if it is truly the child now communicating, then the facilitator would not even need to be in the room, let alone holding the keyboard. The simple acts of a) being in the child's field of vision, and b) holding the device on which the child will be typing, allows a lot of possibilities for body language cues and facilitator influence.

In instances like these, the minute the facilitator leaves the room the child becomes totally non-communicative again. That strongly suggests that it isn't the child communicating in the first place.

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