• October 30, 2014
October 30, 2014, 2:17:41 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with your Chronicle username and password
News: For all you tweeters, follow The Chronicle on Twitter.
 
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: Help with jargon  (Read 4337 times)
science_expat
Science Expat. Just pretending to be a somewhat
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 6,021


« on: June 01, 2012, 11:58:31 AM »

Hi, all

I've just been asked to review a high level Users Requirement Specification for IT in a new campus development. I'm fairly IT literate but have hit a few things I don't understand. To wit:

1. applications centric end-to-end latency

2. technology „touch points‟

3. latency sensitive „media‟ applications

4. when internet access and bandwidth is „contented‟ in service provider networks

Any definitions?
Logged

"Continue to speak truth to power and try to provoke evidence-based debate and decision-making. The holders of power will not like it and your career trajectory will not rise as high as you wish, but you will retain your professional integrity and the respect of those people whom you also respect."
wegie
Unemployed & unemployable
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 11,617


« Reply #1 on: June 01, 2012, 1:45:27 PM »

Hi, all

I've just been asked to review a high level Users Requirement Specification for IT in a new campus development. I'm fairly IT literate but have hit a few things I don't understand. To wit:

Oh lor! Somebody in your IT services has been playing buzzword bingo and has caught a bad attack of web2.0orhea. Whoever they are, take them out and string him (trust me, it will be a him) up by the short and curlies for the ravens to peck at!

1. applications centric end-to-end latency

How to ensure that stuff still looks good once it gets to the user. If you stick the term into google, you get a selection of articles about how standard measures of testing latency don't often seem to work with video.

2. technology „touch points‟

How and where technology impacts upon users. So, f'r instance, if you're talking about your campus's online presence, the touch points may be the web site, a facebook page, twitter feed, etc. You also have to ensure that all of these work across a variety of technologies . . . so if your stuff only works well on IE on a traditional windows box or your mobile site only works on an iPhone, you're not only limiting your potential touch points, but you may even be providing a negative touch point that may make a potential customer/student go somewhere else.

3. latency sensitive „media‟ applications

Stuff that depends on a rapid real time response for effectiveness. The usual example here is online gaming... hammer the mouse and get no feedback, hammer the mouse again, screen suddenly flashes through six transitions and you walk straight into the troll, crunch. In an academic context, online science simulation experiments and conferencing/chat programs often experience the same problems.
 
4. when internet access and bandwidth is „contented‟ in service provider networks

Wikepedia has a fairly decent description of contention ratios. I assume that at this point they're talking about potential problems related to off-campus access to resources?

Bad contention ratios have a nasty habit of absolutely killing the kinds of apps referred to in section 3.

If the rest of the document is written in the same manner, you have my deepest sympathies and the offer of several suitable beverages!
Logged
science_expat
Science Expat. Just pretending to be a somewhat
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 6,021


« Reply #2 on: June 04, 2012, 4:24:19 PM »

Thanks.

But, WTF does "latency" mean to serious computer types?

For instance: "support rich media applications that are latency sensitive"
Logged

"Continue to speak truth to power and try to provoke evidence-based debate and decision-making. The holders of power will not like it and your career trajectory will not rise as high as you wish, but you will retain your professional integrity and the respect of those people whom you also respect."
wegie
Unemployed & unemployable
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 11,617


« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2012, 6:27:58 PM »

Thanks.

But, WTF does "latency" mean to serious computer types?

For instance: "support rich media applications that are latency sensitive"

I'd usually stick with the stating that it's the time lag between input from the user and the action by the application that corresponds with the user's input.

So, if I click the mouse somewhere in an application to perform an action, I expect the click and the action to happen pretty much in real time (low latency). I'm not going to be quite so amused if the application continues operating for several seconds before the mouse click registers (high latency). 
Logged
eigen
Senior member
****
Posts: 563


« Reply #4 on: June 05, 2012, 1:17:46 PM »

Latency is usually measured in milliseconds, fwiw.

A "low" latency is usually somewhere around 100-300, high latency can be has high as 900 or more.

It's basically the time for data to leave your computer, make it to the other connected computer(s), and then make it back.

Low latency is fast enough that you don't really notice it. But if things you're doing take around a second to register, you're definitely going to notice.

If you're doing, say, a collaborative project (file sharing), and it takes a second for each of your document edits to register, it's going to throw everything off. Visually, it's similar to the examples Wegie gave. You type a word, and nothing shows up. You keep typing, and suddenly you get a quazi-freeze frame update of all of the past stuff you've typed all at once.
Logged
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.9 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
  • 1255 Twenty-Third St., N.W.
  • Washington, D.C. 20037
subscribe today

Get the insight you need for success in academe.