Plagiarism in Other Countries

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yellowtractor:
Not a CHE article, so I'm posting here, as part of our ongoing discussion:

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/10/world/europe/german-education-chief-quits-in-scandal-reflecting-fascination-with-titles.html

Discuss.  Or, don't discuss, but bookmark for future stories of plagiarism outside US/Can/UK.

totoro:
The article seems to make a big fuss about Americans being surprised that a PhD would use the title doctor than about the actual plagiarism involved. Is that really the case? I guess that thinking is because all American academics are addressed professor by students.

I always knew that copying other people's writing and research ideas was wrong but I have noticed over time more of a concern about plagiarism in terms of things like not correctly citing and referencing work that I have always thought of as sloppy rather than almost criminal. I first saw that during my third and final stay in the US. I'm beginning to see that in Australia too now as we are using software like Turnitin etc. the same standard is getting universalized. So maybe standards have risen and what it was possible to get away with in Germany several decades ago is now no longer seen as acceptable.

Also, I now see increased discussion around "self-plagiarism" which I would have thought was an oxymoron and was definitely never warned about when I was a PhD student. One of the most famous cases involves a Swiss academic who basically published the same paper several times in different journals. On the other hand, I think it is ridiculous to say you can't use some of the same methods sections or introductory material in different articles as long as each as significant new results in them. It seems standards are tightening on this too.

emilytries:
This story made the headlines for several months in Absurdistan. It's been 'resolved' politically, but there've been no actual consequences, regardless of the condemnations in the media and by international academic circles.

 It casts a very bleak shadow on a system that is already fraught with doubtful practices.

highwall:
What I really hate is the plagiarism of unpublished drafts--so many people are guilty of that.

proftowanda:
Quote from: emilytries on February 10, 2013,  5:59:28 PM

This story made the headlines for several months in Absurdistan. It's been 'resolved' politically, but there've been no actual consequences, regardless of the condemnations in the media and by international academic circles.

 It casts a very bleak shadow on a system that is already fraught with doubtful practices.



Well, we in the U.S. hardly are the ones to castigate Romania . . . considering that we promoted Biden to VP.

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