• October 31, 2014
October 31, 2014, 2:23:25 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with your Chronicle username and password
News: Talk online about your experiences as an adjunct, visiting assistant professor, postdoc, or other contract faculty member.
 
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: JSTOR / ProQuest and similar -- bottom-line total cost per user?  (Read 40949 times)
outsourced
New member
*
Posts: 6


« on: February 18, 2012, 9:57:27 AM »

Greetings, all:
Can anybody provide a rough bottom-line total cost per campus community user for the sort of on-line journal / index / database subscriptions that a typical, well-regarded public or private university/college library would purchase?

Leaving out distorting factors (medical schools?) if possible, but including all likely users:  students, staff, faculty, their families, etc.

   And can a similar figure be suggested for JSTOR alone? 

   Thanks in advance,
   Outsourced

 
Logged
collegekidsmom
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 3,038


« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2012, 9:19:52 PM »

Every university would have a unique situation with the licenses. Many factors are taken into consideration when setting pricing for one database, or all of them.
Logged
libwitch
Member
***
Posts: 188


« Reply #2 on: February 24, 2012, 1:10:26 PM »

Generally, the base cost is going to be based on FTE; but then costs are going to vary based on everything from consortia pricing, to possible discounts for multi-year signed on subs, to possible discounts based on the number of databases by that vendor subbed to.  And as for users - well, I know that we only have accessibly the data vendors give us, and we simply don't track who is using it - meaning that if someone makes it on campus, they could use it.  Our off campus licensing has restrictions to only current campus community, though.   

And off the top of my head, I am not sure of the top of my head what type of data both provide - downloads vs searches vs access etc.

It might be more worthwhile to zero in on particular size of institutions and see if you contact them indiviually to get ballpark ideas....
Logged
outsourced
New member
*
Posts: 6


« Reply #3 on: February 24, 2012, 9:44:41 PM »

Perhaps I can rephrase the question. 

Surely academic libraries know how about much they spend on on-line journal/index/database resources, no?
 
And surely they know the approximate number of students, staff, and faculty at their campus?

Would anybody care to share these two numbers for his or her own school?
Logged
tinyzombie
She of the Badass Abs, and a
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 15,137

elevate from this point on - chuck d


« Reply #4 on: February 24, 2012, 10:47:14 PM »

I'm not sure you're clear on your audience here. While there are certainly academic librarians on the fora (perhaps one of the people who's already replied, though I'm not sure), the majority of the people posting on these fora are faculty, students, and administrators.

Given that, libwitch's advice is very good.

Logged

Quote from: usukprof
I think we have three of them, but the smallest one seems to be the leader.
Quote from: dolljepopp
Who needs real life when Sandra Bullock is around?
Quote from: systeme_d_
You are all my people, and I love you.
collegekidsmom
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 3,038


« Reply #5 on: February 25, 2012, 2:03:30 AM »

Your question might be a bit confusing. JSTOR is a database/ProQuest is a vendor. Medical schools do not distort anything; they are either part of the FTE or not. Not everything is FTE priced. FTE pricing is tiered-so you are paying by broad number categories (if that's how the pricing goes). You only ask about the spend on online resources when budgets take into account all the print and other formats too. Usually, "families" are not part of standard licenses. Some universities have thousands of electronic resources; others have few. There is a huge variation. You would have to be very specific when asking someone to give you this number for one university.

Are you looking for actual cost per use (can be measured on individual databases)-or some total aggregated cost of ALL electronic resources in any single university divided by the number of all potential users? The kind of number you need may not be regularly reported publicly and may need to be a customized request. Added to the difficulty would be that the situation is so fluid that costs and numbers of user is changing all the time.

You might want to look at some published source like the ARL statistics tables for electronic resources expenditures(done annually), or ask a collections officer at your university for access to local statistics.
Logged
outsourced
New member
*
Posts: 6


« Reply #6 on: February 25, 2012, 3:51:33 AM »

You might want to look at some published source like the ARL statistics tables for electronic resources expenditures
Jackpot!
Turns out that just about all relevant figures are reported.  In 2008-2009, of 113 reporting institutions, median expenditure on "Electronic Resources and Materials Expenditures" was $5,584,147.  This figure was rather stable -- the 11th highest school spent $9,391,680, and the 103rd school $3,836,700.

A few details:
$766.17  Since median materals


Total Library Materials Expenditures as a percent of Total Library Expenditures
high   mean   median   low   N
64.39 43.54 43.69 26.78 114
« Last Edit: February 25, 2012, 3:57:15 AM by outsourced » Logged
outsourced
New member
*
Posts: 6


« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2012, 4:24:31 AM »

(sorry, hit the wrong button)
Quote from: collegekidsmom on Today at 01:03:30 AM
You might want to look at some published source like the ARL statistics tables for electronic resources expenditures
Jackpot!
Turns out that just about all relevant figures are reported.  In 2008-2009, of 113 reporting institutions, median expenditure on "Electronic Resources and Materials Expenditures" was $5,584,147.  This figure was rather stable -- the 11th highest school spent $9,391,680, and the 103rd school $3,836,700.

A few details (figures from the ARL report)
$766.17    median total library expenditures per user
44%    all materials as percentage of library budget
56%    percentage of this spent on e-resources
$189    cost of e-resources per user (my calculation)

Running the figures a different way:
$5,584,147     expenditure
23,223   median student FTE
15%     bump the above by 15% for faculty/staff (my wild guess)
26,706   total on-campus community
$209    cost of e-resources per campus user (my calculation)

So, either way it's ballpark $200 per head per year for all e-resources. 

If I can ask a follow-up:  of the $5,584,147 median expenditure on e-resources, about what fraction (or dollar amount) might go to JSTOR?  Typical of JSTOR per user would be fine as well, of course.

  Thanks again for the pointer to the ARL,
  Outsourced
Logged
libwitch
Member
***
Posts: 188


« Reply #8 on: March 01, 2012, 11:38:36 AM »

If you look at how the ARL collects those statistics, you will see that they don't ask for how much libraries spends on indexes - they ask for computer files (one time purchases - which would electronic archives, not on going yearly subscription costs, which is how much indexes are paid; and monographs); ejournals, network and utility costs, hardware and software and then document delivery.   Most libraries would report any costs towards items such as JSTOR and Proquest in with their materials/collections budgets.

Just so you are aware of what you are looking at there.


You might want to look at some published source like the ARL statistics tables for electronic resources expenditures
Jackpot!
Turns out that just about all relevant figures are reported.  In 2008-2009, of 113 reporting institutions, median expenditure on "Electronic Resources and Materials Expenditures" was $5,584,147.  This figure was rather stable -- the 11th highest school spent $9,391,680, and the 103rd school $3,836,700.

A few details:
$766.17  Since median materals


Total Library Materials Expenditures as a percent of Total Library Expenditures
high   mean   median   low   N
64.39 43.54 43.69 26.78 114

Logged
collegekidsmom
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 3,038


« Reply #9 on: March 02, 2012, 12:08:46 AM »

I don't think there is any simple answer. You have to define what you mean by "electronic resources." There are many types. You could ask your university what the JSTOR cost per use number is and I would suspect it would include the following:
1. how many JSTOR subscriptions do you have to the various JSTORs (they keep adding more, so you may subscribe to all or to a few, such as no. 1-7, or only 1-3, etc.) You choose from various "collections" with JSTOR. They add more all the time.
2. What is your FTE?; one nearby university might have more than 50,000 FTE while another nearby school has 6000. The initial price would be based on that number,even if the smaller school has more money
3. How much is the total JSTOR use in the community?; downloads, searches, sessions,  based on COUNTER stats?How is the community defined in the particular situation? One university would show entirely different usage patterns depending on so many factors.
4. You have to separate JSTOR from other resources because the pricing model is different; they charge large continuing fees after paying a certain fee at the beginning. They are priced completely differently than ProQuest resources (straight ongoing subscription) so head to head comparison could not be made for these two providers.
5. If you need the cost per use number for any year for any electronic resource, you could ask a collection development officer in the library.
Finally, percentage amount of use of JSTOR in any university would have to do with how much that particular university uses JSTOR (due to curriculum, research strengths, etc) in comparison to other types of resources. JSTOR also does a LOT of marketing and has a big brand name, so it may take up more percentage that something less well known. In a humanities intensive programs, JSTOR would be cheaper cost per use (more usage) then in a heavy STEM school (higher cost per use; less need for JSTOR).  Lots of factors to consider.
Logged
vkw10
New member
*
Posts: 35


« Reply #10 on: March 17, 2012, 3:57:10 AM »

Another place to look is resources like KanView -- http://www.kansas.gov/KanView/ -- which is the State of Kansas financial openness website. It lets you search for expenditures by vendor and state agency. I can search JSTOR as vendor and a specific university as agency to see what was spent. I've seen similar databases for other states. But since each institution in Kansas has different JSTOR databases, enrollments vary, and database prices are often based on enrollment tiers, this probably still won't answer your question.

When most libraries evaluate databases, we look at cost per use, not cost per user. Suppose my university has 20,000 FTE students/faculty and subscribes to database A at cost of $10,000 and database B at cost of $50,000 per year. If only 100 articles are downloaded from A in a year, while 10,000 are downloaded from B, which is more cost-effective for my university? The number of users often determines price of database, but cost per use is better for evaluating value.

By the way, many database license have confidentiality clauses which prohibit librarians from discussing exactly what they paid. I have to check contracts before talking with colleagues in my own library about what we pay for databases; most people don't have the requisite need to know.
Logged
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.9 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
  • 1255 Twenty-Third St., N.W.
  • Washington, D.C. 20037
subscribe today

Get the insight you need for success in academe.