• June 25, 2016

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June 25, 2016, 10:08:38 am *
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 1 
 on: Today at 09:29:29 am 
Started by mamselle - Last post by proftowanda
That the Leave campaign so successfully tapped into the fears of the angry and ignorant makes me worry, a lot, for the US election.


I think one lesson that the Democrats can learn from this is that a negative campaign based on fear and attacking personalities is a good way of alienating the undecided and reducing the chances of success. At no time during the EU Referendum campaign can I remember Remain giving a positive image of a future UK in Europe. The message was all about the how bad things would be if Leave won (they have been right about that so far, but the disillusioned public wanted to hear a more positive message about the future, and that is what Leave delivered, even though their figures and assumptions were just plain wrong). The attack on the personalities of the leading Leave campaigners looked petty and did not resonate at all well with the electorate. And I say that as a rampant Remain voter. 

Defending a vision of the status quo is probably much more difficult than delivering a radically different vision of the future that has not yet been tested, but campaigners still need positive messages to give people hope.

Also intriguing is an analysis of issues that resonate the most, as these issues differed among the demographic groups.

The Remain campaign put priority on the economic impact -- the positive impact of remaining in the EU, addressing your concern, as well as the negative impact of leaving the EU -- and that was most persuasive with Remain voters. 

And that did resonate with Leave voters, but not as much; the economic impact rated third in their concerns.  They put priority on the immigration impact of leaving or remaining in the EU.  (They rated as second in their concerns the issue of sovereignty.)

Either pollsters missed this significant disparity in concerns, or the Remain campaign didn't address the pollsters' results to adapt their messages to address concerns -- to provide, as you say, a positive, persuasive response to the top issue for Leave voters.

 2 
 on: Today at 09:26:04 am 
Started by amlithist - Last post by protoplasm
Greyscale,   I wept all over again reading that link..

Some other thoughts: of course white men are the majority: they are the majority in the House, the Senate, the Supreme Court, the Governorships, the state legislatures, the CEOs, the university presidencies, the boards of regeants,....
Would anything change if those places were majority women, like the populace?


New, different people to blame for the assorted agony that comes our way. A related question, It might be instructive to have more people running things who are anyone but white heterosexual men. Different people to blame. For example, right now we had the Orlando shooter who was homosexual committing violence against other homosexuals, and some are blaming 'America.'
Or maybe the simple idea that a psychologically mixed up person previously on steroids whose father buys into Islam verses against gays who's committing a violent act against other gays is the result of these factors.

 3 
 on: Today at 09:12:59 am 
Started by prytania3 - Last post by octoprof
Pizza sounds good. I am jealous. I haven't eaten anything outside the house in a week because of new dietary restrictions. Ugh.

Today's list is simple
bike
pack for trip
read
do that scheduling thing for AP and email it
some cleaning tasks

 4 
 on: Today at 08:43:54 am 
Started by mamselle - Last post by scotia
That the Leave campaign so successfully tapped into the fears of the angry and ignorant makes me worry, a lot, for the US election.


I think one lesson that the Democrats can learn from this is that a negative campaign based on fear and attacking personalities is a good way of alienating the undecided and reducing the chances of success. At no time during the EU Referendum campaign can I remember Remain giving a positive image of a future UK in Europe. The message was all about the how bad things would be if Leave won (they have been right about that so far, but the disillusioned public wanted to hear a more positive message about the future, and that is what Leave delivered, even though their figures and assumptions were just plain wrong). The attack on the personalities of the leading Leave campaigners looked petty and did not resonate at all well with the electorate. And I say that as a rampant Remain voter. 

Defending a vision of the status quo is probably much more difficult than delivering a radically different vision of the future that has not yet been tested, but campaigners still need positive messages to give people hope.

 5 
 on: Today at 08:42:25 am 
Started by prytania3 - Last post by paddington_bear
Good morning! Waaaah! My massage has to be rescheduled. I was thinking about getting a pizza for dinner after the massage, but now I have to decide if I want to leave the house just for pizza.

Saturday
*nap
*read book


Sabbatical Projects
*FC research
*revise NP and submit somewhere by Jan.
*more revisions to NP; submit by end of Aug.
*convert WH conf paper into article; submit by April end of June
*THR  - waiting for editor so we can start

 6 
 on: Today at 08:40:57 am 
Started by zuzu_ - Last post by zuzu_
I chatted with my colleague who is creating our new MLA guide. She says Valencia College has the most complete MLA 8th she's seen so far: http://libguides.valenciacollege.edu/mla8

She also agrees that the container idea is confusing.

That is so cool. Thank you.

A former coworker of mine, one of my favorite librarians ever, works at Valencia now. I wonder if she made it.

 7 
 on: Today at 08:40:48 am 
Started by polly_mer - Last post by mamselle
I misread this title as ending in "burnout," just now.

Can't find the thread to say so in the minute I have before I leave to teach my private music students, but it started my forum-reading with a smile, anyway.

M.

 8 
 on: Today at 08:16:36 am 
Started by mamselle - Last post by eulerian_ta
Turned on the news yesterday and there weren't  any people jumping out of skyscraper windows en masse in the financial sector.  Could George Soros and the rest of the money changers and banksters who fought the Brexit have been wrong?  Nah,  they couldn't have.  I'll be stocking my bunker with water and non-perishable food if anyone needs me.

 9 
 on: Today at 06:53:52 am 
Started by mickeymantle - Last post by marshwiggle
Quote
How has society come to the point where people feel some sort of moral imperative to "follow their dreams" so that being realistic and finding something which is neither immoral nor illegal and pays the rent is a "failure"?

This sentiment strikes me as victim blaming to some degree. Was he following his dreams, or was he investing a great deal of his own time and money in something he was being told from all angles would lead to a decent job?

His words were
Quote
I feel like a failure. I feel like I have no future. I feel like Iíve wasted my life trying to be earnest and idealistic.

The primary goal of a young adult is to become independent, meaning becoming financially self-sufficient. Being "earnest" is not as important as being honest about how things work and being "idealistic" should not prevent being realistic about one's options. The statement I quoted sounds similar to people who dedicate their lives to winning Olympic gold medals which they never achieve. There are factors outside our control which mean that any lofty goal we have may not be attainable in practice, and we must be able to adapt to life as it is.


Quote
Now he can't get a decent job to pay basic bills, and if anything his Masters or PhD just hurts his chances of being hired in most jobs outside of academia.

After investing so much time and money in what he thought would be a decent "career," you can't blame a father for then feeling like a failure when he feels he can't even provide adequately for his children.
You could say this same thing about Olympic hopefuls; they count on the medal and resulting fame to give them a career related to that. If they don't even make it to the Olympic team, they may feel like failures, but that is because they had a very narrowly-defined version of what they will accept for career options.

Someone who chooses a very narrow definition of "success" can be blamed; not for "failure", but for choosing such a restrictive idea of "success".

 10 
 on: Today at 05:13:24 am 
Started by academicpop - Last post by busyslinky
$20,000 less?  Don't take the VAP unless they match your current salary.  If they don't match it, don't take it.  If they match it, then you have an issue to consider.  I'd request a leave of absence and try the VAP, but only if the salary is the same or more than your current salary.

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