• November 1, 2014
November 01, 2014, 3:42:10 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with your Chronicle username and password
News: Talk online about your experiences as an adjunct, visiting assistant professor, postdoc, or other contract faculty member.
 
Pages: [1] 2
  Print  
Author Topic: How to start a career with nothing.  (Read 53213 times)
zak327
New member
*
Posts: 3


« on: November 30, 2011, 11:21:20 PM »

Ok, so I was suggested to this site by a friend who is concerned with my intellectual health. I have been dealing with the faults of "intellectual giftedness" my whole life and just recently figured It all out. I grew up In a small town In Pennsylvania called Chambersburg. The lack of education there Is sickening so please bare with my spelling and grammar. I can do anything I put my mind to and would like to, I mean, NEED to further my education and begin the progression of a career. My enviroment does not meet my entillectual needs and it Is taking me to dark places, If anyone gets my gist. I dropped out of 10th grade due to social problems and have been meaning to get my G.E.D. That Is proving to be impossable as well. I have no job, no car to get to the job, I live 5 miles away from town, and all I want to do Is feed my mind with as much knowlege as possible. I actually wish I had home work. So, now that you know a little about me, the question Is: how do I further my education, get out of this town, and move on to bigger, brighter things, with abesolutely nothing? I need help, i need advice, please.
Logged
larryc
Troll Proof
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 23,004

Be excellent to each other.


WWW
« Reply #1 on: November 30, 2011, 11:32:00 PM »

Step 1 is the GED. You can study for it online. Get going.
Logged

Trolling for sex is not what this forum is all about.
zak327
New member
*
Posts: 3


« Reply #2 on: November 30, 2011, 11:37:24 PM »

I'd love to, but I have no way to get to G.E.D. classes nor money to pay for online classes.
Logged
systeme_d_
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 16,159

No T, no shade. Usually.


« Reply #3 on: November 30, 2011, 11:43:03 PM »

There are lots of places online where you can prepare for the GED test for free.  Here's a list provided by the state of Oregon, but there are more.

http://www.oregon.gov/CCWD/GED/PDF/GEDOnlineCourses.pdf?ga=t
Logged

antiphon1
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 3,252


« Reply #4 on: November 30, 2011, 11:46:21 PM »

Call the local school district or the nearest community college.  There are no cost programs and grants available through these institutions aimed at helping people like you graduate from high school/pass the GED and transition to college.  You'll need explain your situation to a counselor.  He or she can then can direct you to the services and funding most helpful to your situation.  
Logged
zak327
New member
*
Posts: 3


« Reply #5 on: November 30, 2011, 11:54:46 PM »

Thanks a lot, antiphon1. You're advice is perfect.
Logged
antiphon1
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 3,252


« Reply #6 on: November 30, 2011, 11:58:54 PM »

You are quite welcome.  Good luck!
Logged
usukprof
Not sure he's been around long enough to really be a
Member-Moderator
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 10,607

.


« Reply #7 on: April 09, 2012, 11:40:03 AM »

Your answer to everything seems to be online courses.  The OP needs to start with a GED, and then figure out how to progress to college.
Logged

Fat, drunk, and stupid is no way to go through life, son.  --Dean Vernon Wormer
tinyzombie
She of the Badass Abs, and a
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 15,137

elevate from this point on - chuck d


« Reply #8 on: May 24, 2012, 12:00:19 PM »

Your answer to everything seems to be online courses.  The OP needs to start with a GED, and then figure out how to progress to college.

Whose "answer to everything"?
Logged

Quote from: usukprof
I think we have three of them, but the smallest one seems to be the leader.
Quote from: dolljepopp
Who needs real life when Sandra Bullock is around?
Quote from: systeme_d_
You are all my people, and I love you.
usukprof
Not sure he's been around long enough to really be a
Member-Moderator
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 10,607

.


« Reply #9 on: May 24, 2012, 3:56:28 PM »

Your answer to everything seems to be online courses.  The OP needs to start with a GED, and then figure out how to progress to college.

Whose "answer to everything"?

One of the trollers, who must be gone.  I should've quoted my reply...
Logged

Fat, drunk, and stupid is no way to go through life, son.  --Dean Vernon Wormer
tinyzombie
She of the Badass Abs, and a
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 15,137

elevate from this point on - chuck d


« Reply #10 on: May 24, 2012, 4:09:31 PM »

Your answer to everything seems to be online courses.  The OP needs to start with a GED, and then figure out how to progress to college.

Whose "answer to everything"?

One of the trollers, who must be gone.  I should've quoted my reply...

Oh, duh. No worries. (Out of context, the response didn't seem like you!)
Logged

Quote from: usukprof
I think we have three of them, but the smallest one seems to be the leader.
Quote from: dolljepopp
Who needs real life when Sandra Bullock is around?
Quote from: systeme_d_
You are all my people, and I love you.
pigou
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 1,474


« Reply #11 on: May 24, 2012, 8:03:11 PM »

Do you know anyone who might be willing to carpool to the nearest community college with you in exchange for you contributing to gas? If not, look up local community colleges and see if they have some kind of community board where you can post a message for students. Maybe someone lives in your area and heads there for classes, and would take you along. That being said, if you're motivated, you can just order a book on the GED from amazon for $10 and not worry about the commute to classes. See how you're doing on it, maybe you don't need face-to-face classes.

Do you live with your parents? Can they drive you to town? You should try to get a part-time job. It won't provide you with a career, but it gets you out of the house and you can make some money. It will also help you find other jobs down the road. Even if you get your GED and finance a community college education with loans, you're not likely to end up with a career-track job either. You'd need to transfer to a 4 year institution (which are more expensive), major in a field that is in demand, have internship experience... going to college is a good start, but it's not going to pay the bills.

The best way to broaden your mind is to read books. That will also help with reading and writing skills. Is there a local library that you can get access to?
Logged
drjennycrisp
Junior member
**
Posts: 69


« Reply #12 on: May 24, 2012, 10:12:26 PM »

Check out the national literacy directory and call one of the services in your area to see what they can do to help: http://www.nationalliteracydirectory.org/

I just got home from our local GED graduation about an hour ago -- it's hard for a lot of people, but I can tell you just from the people I talked to tonight that it can be done, and it's more than worth the work!
Logged
eigen
Senior member
****
Posts: 563


« Reply #13 on: June 01, 2012, 3:55:32 PM »

I'll also throw in that you don't always need a GED to start college. You might have a community college in your area that you can start at without a GED, which might be more successful.

Looking at the HACC (Central Pennsylvania Community College) website, the college will admit people over 18 without a GED if they are deemed capable of the coursework.

It might benefit you to study for and take the GED, but you might get more mileage out of moving past it if possible.
Logged
kelsun
New member
*
Posts: 18


« Reply #14 on: June 02, 2012, 1:21:40 AM »

You do not need your GED to get into most community colleges.   You can go straight to a community college in your area or to one online, earn 15 to 24 credits, and transfer to many four year institutions.  Alternatively, you can get your associates at the community college and then go to the four year.  Again, as said by another poster, you do not HAVE to get your GED.  In fact, I think that this could be a waste of your precious time.  If you are truly gifted intellectually, and I will take your word for it, then you can go straight to one of many community colleges and enroll. One ugly issue is financial aid.  Starting this year, pell grant requires a high school credential for eligibility.  If you will necessarily be using the free pell grant money to pay for your college tuition, then you do have to get your GED or some high school credential.   
« Last Edit: June 02, 2012, 1:23:31 AM by kelsun » Logged
Pages: [1] 2
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.9 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
  • 1255 Twenty-Third St., N.W.
  • Washington, D.C. 20037
subscribe today

Get the insight you need for success in academe.