Learning Centered College

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geheimrat:
At my community college we are being asked to describe our vision of a learning centered college.  All of the descriptions I have read either seem extremely vague or things that are obvious.  An example of what I am talking about is the statement "a learning centered college values student learning as the end goal of teaching".  What else would the end goal of teaching be? 

Can someone give me some concrete examples of what they view learning centered teaching to be as well as some concrete examples of what type of teaching wouldn't be learning centered. 

dept_geek:
Quote from: geheimrat on March 13, 2013,  6:46:26 PM

At my community college we are being asked to describe our vision of a learning centered college.  All of the descriptions I have read either seem extremely vague or things that are obvious.  An example of what I am talking about is the statement "a learning centered college values student learning as the end goal of teaching".  What else would the end goal of teaching be? 

Can someone give me some concrete examples of what they view learning centered teaching to be as well as some concrete examples of what type of teaching wouldn't be learning centered. 



Oh gosh. It's got to you already? Sorry. It was here, but quickly moved on in favor of some other thing... 

histchick:
This is not good advice, but I would say that my vision of a learning-centered college is one in which faculty don't have to spend our time working on such garbage.  I honestly would, and so would the other faculty in my department. 

oldfullprof:
Student learning is none of my business.  Each individuals learns differently.  Good teaching is my responsibility.

mountainguy:
I hate the phrase "learning centered." It's bureaucratic edu-speak.

That having been said, when administrators and pedagogy gurus use this phrase, they typically mean some combination of the following:

      1) Active learning informed by constructivist pedagogy (ie, students are actively creating/experiencing
          knowledge rather than just passively receiving it).

      2) Frequent formative assessment linked to course objectives.

      3) Metacognition, such as self-reflection papers and goal-setting.

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