Taking interest in a student's work outside of the classroom?

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parakeet:
Well, this feels kind of funny, but...

Recently, I've had a professor approach me, asking me about some of the work I've had published in a particular literary journal.  From what I understand, she saw my bio and recognized me/my name, and now she'd like to meet with me to discuss my work.  I am both honored and a little nervous, but most likely just because I'm not one to speak of my work, not even to family members really.

And as a regular lurker of your forum (teehee), I couldn't help wondering how common this is. Are you eager to speak with your students about their accomplishments outside of the classroom? Do you actively try to do so?
It seems that this may be a custom of sorts at the small liberal arts college that I attend.  After a long, rigorous semester (and after grades were in, as to not seem like a grade-grubber in disguise :P), I emailed a professor to thank her for a wonderful class and for helping me both to improve my work and to feel more confident in my performance.  She was delighted that I'd emailed her and invited me to her office at any time to discuss what's going on in my life and how I'm doing with my work.


Just wanted to hear how close some of you like to get with your students.

yellowtractor:
I'm also at a SLAC, and yes, this is part of what we do, with students who interest us and/or seem promising.  Many of us specifically sought work at SLAC's so that we could have precisely this sort of relationship with our best students.

If you wanted to blend into a faceless crowd, you should have (a) attended a much larger school and (b) not sent your work out for publication!

amlithist:
Teehee.


<I've got the Dr. Pepper and some homemade chex mix.  Anyone want to join me here to watch?>

polly_mer:
Like YT, I purposely took jobs where I would get to know my students as people.  I absolutely have emailed students to congratulate them on accomplishments.  I have stopped students in the hall to talk.  I leave my door open for anyone who wants to stop by to chat about anything, not just a homework problem.  Some students take me up on that offer.  Other students are willing to talk before and after class, but won't make a special trip.

I am very proud of many of my students who came in regularly to discuss their lives and either took my advice or went to get other advice to help with career goals, life goals, or just doing something interesting.

I am happy about some of the students who hit rough spots in their lives, asked for help, and took it when help was given.  Classes were beside the point when their lives blew up and I'm proud of them for reaching out and asking for help to get back on track before returning to school.

In short, yes, some of us do reach out to our students for non-classroom activities, not just accomplishments, and consider that part of our jobs.

parakeet:
Quote from: yellowtractor on January 03, 2013,  5:43:16 PM

I'm also at a SLAC, and yes, this is part of what we do, with students who interest us and/or seem promising.  Many of us specifically sought work at SLAC's so that we could have precisely this sort of relationship with our best students.

If you wanted to blend into a faceless crowd, you should have (a) attended a much larger school and (b) not sent your work out for publication!


Hey, I don't have any real problem with it! :P As I've said, I am honored and I'm as human as anyone else and enjoy the validation. And I /did/ choose to attend a smaller school because I do enjoy smaller classes.
I just wasn't expecting that kind of interest.

I think it's cool that professors take the time to show interest in their students.
Thanks for your response!

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