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Author Topic: Taking materials  (Read 20326 times)
octoprof
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« Reply #15 on: March 15, 2012, 7:10:52 PM »



The professor who is using the materials is a full professor, so I don't think that going to the chair will result in any benefit. I think that I just have to develop new ones, unfortunately. His TAs also have them now, and so they will be used in other sections of his class too, I imagine.

So the jerk is a full professor.  So what?  See your chair.  You have been treated extremely unfairly, and deserve better.

His rank does not negate the fact that he is a thief. Go to your head of department.
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larryc
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« Reply #16 on: March 15, 2012, 7:50:23 PM »

You may in fact own your own course materials. At my school our collective bargaining agreement is very clear that our lectures, activities, etc. are our own intellectual property and do not belong to the university.
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spinnaker
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« Reply #17 on: March 15, 2012, 8:33:36 PM »

I am very upset, so apologies in advance if this sounds like a rant. I would like to know what other adjuncts would suggest I do, if anything.

I have taught a few courses for a department for the past 8 years. I usually teach in the evenings and do not have any lab resources that the professors who teach during the day are able to use with their students. Consequently, I developed a number of computer lab simulations to provide some lab experience for students. These exercises required a great deal of effort to test and develop.

Last semester, professor who teaches other courses stopped into my class to ask about my labs. I told him that I used simulations. He eagerly asked if he could use them. I declined, explaining that I did not have access to other resources. The simulations are fun and would engage students in his class, but they are not as relevant to his topics as they are to mine.

I assigned the labs as usual this semester, only to learn that the students had already done them in his class. He must have had the tech person extract them from my class website.

Quiet, nonchalant voice: "Hello, students. Regarding our course material: funny thing, last semester another professor asked me if he could use my computer lab simulations for his class. I told him, I'm sorry, I can't do that.
Now I see that you've done them already. Of course they've been on the course website.
"I shall now go to plan B." (Roll eyes and smile)

« Last Edit: March 15, 2012, 8:38:32 PM by spinnaker » Logged

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adjunctprincipessa
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« Reply #18 on: March 15, 2012, 10:42:02 PM »

I'm really sorry that this happened.  I was hired to adjunct an online course, and before giving me access to the Blackboard site of previous versions of the course, the tech staff required email confirmation from the previous professors granting consent for me to have access to the course.  If you choose to fight this, you might want to speak to the tech staff department to register a complaint. 
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pink_
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« Reply #19 on: March 16, 2012, 7:48:49 AM »

OP,
I would look into setting up a site on WordPress, which will let you set up a page for free. If wanted to get fancy and devote more time to it over the summer, you could also purchase your own domain and just use the WordPress interface.  There are lots of tutorials available, but I found it very intuitive, and I'm not a computer genius by any stretch.
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jeffahall
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« Reply #20 on: March 19, 2012, 2:04:11 PM »

When I wrote my first quiz as a brand-new TA in grad school, a professor took me aside and said, "When you write anything, a quiz or a syllabus or a piece of code, make sure that you put "Copyright xxxx, Your Name" at the bottom.  It's still your property either way, but the copyright notice acts as a jerk-repellent."
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polly_mer
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Have you worked on that project today?


« Reply #21 on: March 19, 2012, 5:21:39 PM »

When I wrote my first quiz as a brand-new TA in grad school, a professor took me aside and said, "When you write anything, a quiz or a syllabus or a piece of code, make sure that you put "Copyright xxxx, Your Name" at the bottom.  It's still your property either way, but the copyright notice acts as a jerk-repellent."


That's great advice.  More of us should be given that advice.
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spinnaker
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« Reply #22 on: March 20, 2012, 9:48:55 PM »

When I wrote my first quiz as a brand-new TA in grad school, a professor took me aside and said, "When you write anything, a quiz or a syllabus or a piece of code, make sure that you put "Copyright xxxx, Your Name" at the bottom.  It's still your property either way, but the copyright notice acts as a jerk-repellent."


My contract says that any work that I produce in the act of teaching for them is their property, so I expect they could object to this.
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usukprof
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« Reply #23 on: March 21, 2012, 7:57:57 AM »

When I wrote my first quiz as a brand-new TA in grad school, a professor took me aside and said, "When you write anything, a quiz or a syllabus or a piece of code, make sure that you put "Copyright xxxx, Your Name" at the bottom.  It's still your property either way, but the copyright notice acts as a jerk-repellent."


My contract says that any work that I produce in the act of teaching for them is their property, so I expect they could object to this.

Ugh.  For profit?
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spinnaker
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« Reply #24 on: March 21, 2012, 8:20:58 AM »

When I wrote my first quiz as a brand-new TA in grad school, a professor took me aside and said, "When you write anything, a quiz or a syllabus or a piece of code, make sure that you put "Copyright xxxx, Your Name" at the bottom.  It's still your property either way, but the copyright notice acts as a jerk-repellent."


My contract says that any work that I produce in the act of teaching for them is their property, so I expect they could object to this.

Ugh.  For profit?

No.
I don't mean to suggest that having this provision means that raiding an adjunct's supply of original teaching materials would be considered fair play by everyone. I have no reason to assume that. Even though as I said two of them have done that to me. It's infrequent, but bothersome when it happens.
No, actually one asked for a couple of my works and got them. The other asked for a couple of my works and didn't get them. I said "sure" then just forgot about it and he didn't ask again. He was not the chair.
But that was before this provision was in the contract. So I expect if anyone asks me now, other than another adjunct, I might consider that I am required to comply.
This provision appeared on the contracts several years ago.
« Last Edit: March 21, 2012, 8:26:03 AM by spinnaker » Logged

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wegie
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« Reply #25 on: March 21, 2012, 9:00:07 AM »

When I wrote my first quiz as a brand-new TA in grad school, a professor took me aside and said, "When you write anything, a quiz or a syllabus or a piece of code, make sure that you put "Copyright xxxx, Your Name" at the bottom.  It's still your property either way, but the copyright notice acts as a jerk-repellent."


My contract says that any work that I produce in the act of teaching for them is their property, so I expect they could object to this.

Ugh.  For profit?

Not necessarily. My last two UK university employers both owned anything I did on their time or with their equipment. Only Cambridge that I know of over here doesn't have an IP clause like that in their contracts.

I have fun going back to employer number 1's website every so often and seeing how much of one of my course descriptions is still extant. Sixteen years down the line and three lecturers later, there's about 30% of my prose left in the course description, and the aims and outcomes are still pretty much as I wrote them.
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hegemony
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« Reply #26 on: March 21, 2012, 1:36:20 PM »

My U told us that anything we put on Blackboard or a university website is technically their property.  "But we wouldn't bother to enforce that unless it were valuable," they said.  So they wouldn't lay claim to it unless it could actually do us some good -- well, I guess that makes it all right then ...
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usukprof
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« Reply #27 on: March 22, 2012, 3:04:18 AM »

Every one of my Powerpoint foils has the (copyright) symbol in front of my name, FWIW.
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skeptical
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« Reply #28 on: March 23, 2012, 5:45:41 PM »

In any case, even if your university owns the rights to your work, that doesn't necessarily mean that a colleague has a right to use them. First (as someone above mentioned) I would check to see that this person actually is using your work. He is stealing your the fruits of your labor for his own purposes--and therefore, diluting your teaching contribution.
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usukprof
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« Reply #29 on: March 24, 2012, 5:23:27 AM »

And of course, it is plagiarism if you are not cited as the original source.
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