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Author Topic: Long-term effects of UTI/kidney infection?  (Read 60350 times)
biomancer
trying to be the person my dog thinks I am
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« Reply #30 on: February 25, 2012, 8:37:13 AM »

Well, I appreciate your reply, Biomancer. That makes a lot of sense. I also suspect that the almost-dried-out castile soap wipes might have had something to do with it. Okay.

It is times like this when I hate the terminology used that is presented to patients but isn't put in terms people like me can understand. I have a PhD, folks! NOT an MD!

Okay. I'm all right. Just exasperated.

<offers GM a gentle hug> 

I completely understand the need for medical testing and such to be done with the jargon and abbreviations (so that the paperwork doesn't have to be six times longer than it already is), but I agree that physicians and other health care workers should explain things to their patients in a way that the patients can clearly understand.  I think there's a fear sometimes that something will be lost in translation (or not translated correctly), and that something would be a big enough deal to merit a lawsuit.
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Clueless people can be dangerous. The acidic environment they can spread often needs to be neutralized, and humor is basic.  - Dellaroux

I have realized that it is best to assume everyone is bonkers until they demonstrate otherwise. - ChaosByDesign
itried
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« Reply #31 on: March 07, 2012, 8:09:43 AM »

Well, after my round of antibiotics, I've been back for two followup urinalyses. Both showed no bacterial growth, but trace blood. My doctor doesn't think this is anything to be concerned about, because the dipstick (or whatever they use) can detect even a few blood cells. Still, this seems concerning to me. Is it normal -- or at least acceptable -- to have "trace blood" in one's urine? As some of you may recall, I had "trace blood" in my urine a year ago after my last round of antibiotics, and even my urologist sent me home with the all clear; he said, "trace is only a few cells per unit x*, so we don't really worry about that."

*On the microscope slide, I guess... mm^2?
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biomancer
trying to be the person my dog thinks I am
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Posts: 11,095

CHE Fora Hazmat Team


« Reply #32 on: March 07, 2012, 9:25:02 AM »

Well, after my round of antibiotics, I've been back for two followup urinalyses. Both showed no bacterial growth, but trace blood. My doctor doesn't think this is anything to be concerned about, because the dipstick (or whatever they use) can detect even a few blood cells. Still, this seems concerning to me. Is it normal -- or at least acceptable -- to have "trace blood" in one's urine? As some of you may recall, I had "trace blood" in my urine a year ago after my last round of antibiotics, and even my urologist sent me home with the all clear; he said, "trace is only a few cells per unit x*, so we don't really worry about that."

*On the microscope slide, I guess... mm^2?

I'm not a nephrologist... but my gut feeling is that it's probably not a big deal as long as it's cells turning up during urinalysis and not blood that you can see in the toilet.  The fact that there's no bacterial growth is a good sign, and at this point, you may just have a few rogue white blood cells who were patrolling the kidney still ending up in the urine.
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Clueless people can be dangerous. The acidic environment they can spread often needs to be neutralized, and humor is basic.  - Dellaroux

I have realized that it is best to assume everyone is bonkers until they demonstrate otherwise. - ChaosByDesign
itried
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Posts: 459


« Reply #33 on: March 07, 2012, 7:12:05 PM »

Thank you biomancer. I've had two doctors tell me not to worry about this, so I hope I'm getting good advice.

« Last Edit: March 07, 2012, 7:13:22 PM by itried » Logged
hegemony
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« Reply #34 on: March 07, 2012, 8:33:53 PM »

itried, I have no idea of your specific circumstances, of course.  But the last time this happened to me, the doctor told me that the normal quick-&-easy test for blood in the urine is highly accurate for negatives, but not as accurate for positives.  He said if the result came in at less than 4 (or .4, or something with a 4 in it), it was dubious and could easily be a false positive.  Above 4 was more likely to be genuine.  Mine came in at 2 (or .2, or whatever it was) twice.  They did a further, more precise test and found that it was indeed a false positive -- no blood.  Now, I don't know if your test was the same.  But that is one possibility.
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Tragedy tomorrow, comedy tonight.
itried
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« Reply #35 on: March 07, 2012, 10:22:54 PM »

Thank you hegemony. I wish my doctors would tell me details like that... I would feel more in control of how I interpret and act upon what they're telling me.
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itried
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« Reply #36 on: March 15, 2012, 12:54:54 PM »

Results of this week's follow-up urinalysis: negative for blood, cytology normal. Yippee!
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mixedmetaphor
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« Reply #37 on: March 15, 2012, 4:13:49 PM »

Excellent news, itried!!!
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biomancer
trying to be the person my dog thinks I am
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 11,095

CHE Fora Hazmat Team


« Reply #38 on: March 15, 2012, 4:56:05 PM »

Results of this week's follow-up urinalysis: negative for blood, cytology normal. Yippee!

Great news, ITried!
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Clueless people can be dangerous. The acidic environment they can spread often needs to be neutralized, and humor is basic.  - Dellaroux

I have realized that it is best to assume everyone is bonkers until they demonstrate otherwise. - ChaosByDesign
itried
Senior member
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Posts: 459


« Reply #39 on: March 16, 2012, 5:07:10 PM »

Thanks mixedmetaphor and biomancer!
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musicagloria
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« Reply #40 on: October 03, 2012, 12:14:18 PM »

I worked in a building which didn't have potable water or a bathroom that worked properly the last academic year. My contract wasn't renewed (thankfully, but now I'm unemployed or more positively a home engineer). If I forgot to bring water, I'd have to run home (not too far away), but I certainly couldn't have gone home to the bathroom each time. Highly stressful job bottomed out my iron and Vit B, so had to go on a high iron diet, no caffeine. Already eat a low salt, low sugar and low fat diet.

Wondering how much that contributed to my illness: Recently hospitalized for a kidney stone, kidney infection and UTI. Just discharged yesterday. A few types of IV antibiotics plus emergency surgery. I've never been that sick in my life.

Anybody have an idea of how long recovery will take?
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itried
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Posts: 459


« Reply #41 on: November 06, 2012, 5:55:46 PM »

Hi musicagloria,
Oh no... that sounds like a painful and frightening illness. I'm so glad you were released to go home.

Since my kidney infection didn't necessitate surgery for a stone, I can't really speak to how long your recovery will take... but for me, it took about three days after starting a heavy dose of antibiotics before I felt wanted to get out of bed, and two weeks before my energy level returned to normal. I'd lost some weight and needed to put it back on... and wow, did eating feel wonderful once I felt well again!

Take good care of yourself!
« Last Edit: November 06, 2012, 5:56:24 PM by itried » Logged
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