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Author Topic: that half-timer  (Read 12694 times)
proftowanda
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Posts: 6,946

"Righter of wrongs, queen beyond compare."


« Reply #45 on: April 25, 2012, 11:00:22 PM »

OK, fine - I didn't mean to offend anyone. So pull up your chairs over there and exclude other well-meaning contributors. It's quite alright.
But has it never occurred to you how it feels for the (adult) students in your class who are being locked in (figuratively speaking). So what do you do if one of your "good ones" gets a caughing fit or acute case of severe hickups - not allowed to re-enter then, huh? No, but seriously now, I thought there were plenty of others who posted earlier and also had good points about how an effective instructor can manage a class room without having to resort to locking doors. I think it is worthwhile contemplating those suggestions. ...just sayin'

If you did not mean to be offensive, fine -- but here's a hint for the future:  the "I'm sorry, but" construction always, always communicates that the writer (or speaker) is about to be offensive. 

And, of course, that the writer (or speaker) isn't sorry, not at all.

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"Face it, girls.  I'm older, and I have more insurance."     -- Towanda!
cc_alan
is a wossname
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Posts: 9,562

Caution! Nekkid Zamboni driver ahead.


« Reply #46 on: April 25, 2012, 11:18:05 PM »

I'm confused about the reading comprehension issue.  No one is permanently locked out of my classes for any reason.  Just like the theatre does not allow people to interrupt the performance until a natural break occurs, I do not allow students to be a distraction from the main lecture.  When the natural break occurs, then the door is opened and people are admitted.

If you don't like that, then you are siding with the distraction, not the paying customers' right to a full educational experience.  Coughers should go in the hall and they will come back in a few minutes.

Oh, and FYI, the door is locked for perhaps as much as 15 minutes during a two-hour class.  For the rest of the time, people are free to do what they like as long as they are not actively denigrating the class.  I have never had a student pitch a fit like you are on this thread, Cirronimbus.

It would sort of be fun to see.

CN: <walks to front of room> I demand that you let me out right now!
PM: Sure, no problem, go on out.
Other students: What's up with that guy?

It would be even more entertaining if he did it every time.

<looking around for Cirronimbus>

Who let him out, anyway?

I think he stepped out to take a phone call. The door's still locked so he can't get back in, however.

There were still more than 5 minutes left in class today when some people starting packing up. It's like dogs barking- one starts packing and then more join in.

"NO PREFLIGHT. We still have time left in class and since I'm not done, that means you aren't done. STOP IT."

Alan
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Guess what? I got a fever and the only prescription is MORE COWBELL!
infopri
I guess I'm now a VERY
Distinguished Senior Member
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Posts: 23,568

When all else fails, let us agree to disagree.


« Reply #47 on: April 25, 2012, 11:24:43 PM »

My department head and I teach different sections of the same course, with enrollements each approaching about 30 students.  She told me today that, at this point, only about four students show up for her class.  It's a required class that the students hate--they don't know why they have to take it--but I was still shocked, as I have almost 100 percent attendance every session, except for the past week or so.  (We're at the very end of the semester now, plus we're on the hardest unit in the course.)  I'm not sure what I'd do if only four people showed up every class period.  (I hope I don't have to find out what I'd do!)
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People who do not understand numbers should not be allowed to use them for anything. - DvF

MYOB.  Y enseņen bien a sus hijos.
polly_mer
practice makes perfect
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 37,441

Have you worked on that project today?


« Reply #48 on: April 26, 2012, 7:47:36 AM »

I'm not sure what I'd do if only four people showed up every class period.  (I hope I don't have to find out what I'd do!)

If the same four people show up all the time, then I just adjust my thinking and planning for those four people.  We have a nice small class and get to have great discussions.

If a different four people show up, then I pretend that I don't care and continue on.  Depending on the class, I will either just do standalone activities so that everyone learns something or lecture as though everyone were attending all the time since a logical assumption is students are keeping up with the reading and only attending the lectures where they want clarification.
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I've joined a bizarre cult called JordanCanonicalForm's Witnesses.  I have to go from door to door asking people things like, "Good evening, sir!  Do you have a moment to chat about Linear Transformations?"
tinyzombie
She of the Badass Abs, and a
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Posts: 15,137

elevate from this point on - chuck d


« Reply #49 on: April 26, 2012, 9:20:35 AM »

I'm confused about the reading comprehension issue.  No one is permanently locked out of my classes for any reason.  Just like the theatre does not allow people to interrupt the performance until a natural break occurs, I do not allow students to be a distraction from the main lecture.  When the natural break occurs, then the door is opened and people are admitted.

If you don't like that, then you are siding with the distraction, not the paying customers' right to a full educational experience.  Coughers should go in the hall and they will come back in a few minutes.

Oh, and FYI, the door is locked for perhaps as much as 15 minutes during a two-hour class.  For the rest of the time, people are free to do what they like as long as they are not actively denigrating the class.  I have never had a student pitch a fit like you are on this thread, Cirronimbus.

It would sort of be fun to see.

CN: <walks to front of room> I demand that you let me out right now!
PM: Sure, no problem, go on out.
Other students: What's up with that guy?

It would be even more entertaining if he did it every time.

<looking around for Cirronimbus>

Who let him out, anyway?

I think he stepped out to take a phone call. The door's still locked so he can't get back in, however.

There were still more than 5 minutes left in class today when some people starting packing up. It's like dogs barking- one starts packing and then more join in.

"NO PREFLIGHT. We still have time left in class and since I'm not done, that means you aren't done. STOP IT."

Alan

A strong wind came, and he floated away.
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llanfair
Still reading past her bedtime and Very
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Posts: 31,349

Whither Canada?


« Reply #50 on: April 26, 2012, 9:49:00 AM »

There were still more than 5 minutes left in class today when some people starting packing up. It's like dogs barking- one starts packing and then more join in.

"NO PREFLIGHT. We still have time left in class and since I'm not done, that means you aren't done. STOP IT."

Alan

Alan really IS a man among men.

<bats eyelashes>
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Stop looking for zebras when the horse is already standing on your foot.
infopri
I guess I'm now a VERY
Distinguished Senior Member
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Posts: 23,568

When all else fails, let us agree to disagree.


« Reply #51 on: April 26, 2012, 9:53:02 AM »

I'm not sure what I'd do if only four people showed up every class period.  (I hope I don't have to find out what I'd do!)

If the same four people show up all the time, then I just adjust my thinking and planning for those four people.  We have a nice small class and get to have great discussions.

If a different four people show up, then I pretend that I don't care and continue on.  Depending on the class, I will either just do standalone activities so that everyone learns something or lecture as though everyone were attending all the time since a logical assumption is students are keeping up with the reading and only attending the lectures where they want clarification.

Well, yes.  I just have trouble imagining a lab-based course in which two dozen people regularly don't show up.
Logged

People who do not understand numbers should not be allowed to use them for anything. - DvF

MYOB.  Y enseņen bien a sus hijos.
cc_alan
is a wossname
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 9,562

Caution! Nekkid Zamboni driver ahead.


« Reply #52 on: April 26, 2012, 10:17:13 AM »

There were still more than 5 minutes left in class today when some people starting packing up. It's like dogs barking- one starts packing and then more join in.

"NO PREFLIGHT. We still have time left in class and since I'm not done, that means you aren't done. STOP IT."

Alan

Alan really IS a man among men.

<bats eyelashes>

:)

It didn't help that there were some other "issues" with the class that day. I don't think students realize how disrupting it is when they preflight. I know I didn't...

$%#! Did I just admit to doing that as a student? Oops.

A strong wind came, and he floated away.

Sorry! I'm having intestinal issues today. I'll try and be more discrete.

Alan
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Guess what? I got a fever and the only prescription is MORE COWBELL!
cirronimbus
New member
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Posts: 5


« Reply #53 on: April 26, 2012, 11:15:48 AM »

Hello weathered,
I was just wondering how it went with your ghost-student - hope he is finally showing up in time and staying for the whole class. It's still puzzling to me when students do that (or why some don't show up at all).

I've seen some first year students having difficulties at the taking-responsibility-for-their-studies part, but most catch up to the concept in year 2... hopefully. Some just never will, oh well.
I think response #4 from larryc, and #12 from oldadjunct are very good and thoughtful. From my experience, it also depends a little on class size: in small classes, I would either call them out while entering/leaving or send the class an email regarding the late-entering/early-leaving issue, in large classes (think of auditorium with 500+ students) I would make sure that exam-material included things that were part of the beginning/end of various lectures. It's nearly impossible to have all students being on time and staying throughout the entire lecture with so many students - but I ask them to please leave quietly. The majority are attending the entire 1 1/2hr lectures, only a handful step out early. Ultimately, I am teaching to the students who want to learn and attend class, they are the center of my focus (not the ones who couldn't care less).

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weathered
Senior member
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Posts: 434


« Reply #54 on: April 26, 2012, 11:24:53 AM »

The ghost failed that course. F. He didn't do any of the readings. He walked in the last class to do a presentation. He thought he'd get a minimum pass with that, because I didn't look like a harsh person to him (whatever). But he failed, of course, because his grade did not rise above 60%. He didn't have a reason. He went to other classes on time. I saw him in the library etc. Just lazy or hoping to get lucky.
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polly_mer
practice makes perfect
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Posts: 37,441

Have you worked on that project today?


« Reply #55 on: April 26, 2012, 1:27:57 PM »

I'm not sure what I'd do if only four people showed up every class period.  (I hope I don't have to find out what I'd do!)

If the same four people show up all the time, then I just adjust my thinking and planning for those four people.  We have a nice small class and get to have great discussions.

If a different four people show up, then I pretend that I don't care and continue on.  Depending on the class, I will either just do standalone activities so that everyone learns something or lecture as though everyone were attending all the time since a logical assumption is students are keeping up with the reading and only attending the lectures where they want clarification.

Well, yes.  I just have trouble imagining a lab-based course in which two dozen people regularly don't show up.

While I haven't had that happen to me as an instructor, I saw it happen when I was a student and I've had small classes (15 people or so) that became tiny classes (six people or so).
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I've joined a bizarre cult called JordanCanonicalForm's Witnesses.  I have to go from door to door asking people things like, "Good evening, sir!  Do you have a moment to chat about Linear Transformations?"
infopri
I guess I'm now a VERY
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 23,568

When all else fails, let us agree to disagree.


« Reply #56 on: April 26, 2012, 2:02:22 PM »

I'm not sure what I'd do if only four people showed up every class period.  (I hope I don't have to find out what I'd do!)

If the same four people show up all the time, then I just adjust my thinking and planning for those four people.  We have a nice small class and get to have great discussions.

If a different four people show up, then I pretend that I don't care and continue on.  Depending on the class, I will either just do standalone activities so that everyone learns something or lecture as though everyone were attending all the time since a logical assumption is students are keeping up with the reading and only attending the lectures where they want clarification.

Well, yes.  I just have trouble imagining a lab-based course in which two dozen people regularly don't show up.

While I haven't had that happen to me as an instructor, I saw it happen when I was a student and I've had small classes (15 people or so) that became tiny classes (six people or so).

Well, it's a required class--and they can't pass if they don't hand in the work.  They can't graduate if they don't pass.  (In fact, someone told me today that they have to pass with a C or better.) 

Of course, what this means is that the students who are skipping out of my colleague's class are probably going to end up in one of mine next year.  (I'll be teaching multiple sections of it again.)
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People who do not understand numbers should not be allowed to use them for anything. - DvF

MYOB.  Y enseņen bien a sus hijos.
polly_mer
practice makes perfect
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 37,441

Have you worked on that project today?


« Reply #57 on: April 26, 2012, 3:22:44 PM »

I'm not sure what I'd do if only four people showed up every class period.  (I hope I don't have to find out what I'd do!)

If the same four people show up all the time, then I just adjust my thinking and planning for those four people.  We have a nice small class and get to have great discussions.

If a different four people show up, then I pretend that I don't care and continue on.  Depending on the class, I will either just do standalone activities so that everyone learns something or lecture as though everyone were attending all the time since a logical assumption is students are keeping up with the reading and only attending the lectures where they want clarification.

Well, yes.  I just have trouble imagining a lab-based course in which two dozen people regularly don't show up.

While I haven't had that happen to me as an instructor, I saw it happen when I was a student and I've had small classes (15 people or so) that became tiny classes (six people or so).

Well, it's a required class--and they can't pass if they don't hand in the work.  They can't graduate if they don't pass.  (In fact, someone told me today that they have to pass with a C or better.) 

Of course, what this means is that the students who are skipping out of my colleague's class are probably going to end up in one of mine next year.  (I'll be teaching multiple sections of it again.)

If your students are like mine, then the ones who skipped your colleague's class this time will skip your class next time and somehow, magically, fail to graduate again.

I've had one guy manage to fail science for teachers twice for the same nonsense of just not coming to class and not handing in a final project on time.

I've got a three-peater in my engineering class who likely isn't going to make it again this time, either, for the same problem of not attending enough class to learn the material, not turning in enough homework, and bombing the tests that come directly from the lecture and homework.
Logged

I've joined a bizarre cult called JordanCanonicalForm's Witnesses.  I have to go from door to door asking people things like, "Good evening, sir!  Do you have a moment to chat about Linear Transformations?"
infopri
I guess I'm now a VERY
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 23,568

When all else fails, let us agree to disagree.


« Reply #58 on: April 28, 2012, 2:21:09 AM »

I'm not sure what I'd do if only four people showed up every class period.  (I hope I don't have to find out what I'd do!)

If the same four people show up all the time, then I just adjust my thinking and planning for those four people.  We have a nice small class and get to have great discussions.

If a different four people show up, then I pretend that I don't care and continue on.  Depending on the class, I will either just do standalone activities so that everyone learns something or lecture as though everyone were attending all the time since a logical assumption is students are keeping up with the reading and only attending the lectures where they want clarification.

Well, yes.  I just have trouble imagining a lab-based course in which two dozen people regularly don't show up.

While I haven't had that happen to me as an instructor, I saw it happen when I was a student and I've had small classes (15 people or so) that became tiny classes (six people or so).

Well, it's a required class--and they can't pass if they don't hand in the work.  They can't graduate if they don't pass.  (In fact, someone told me today that they have to pass with a C or better.) 

Of course, what this means is that the students who are skipping out of my colleague's class are probably going to end up in one of mine next year.  (I'll be teaching multiple sections of it again.)

If your students are like mine, then the ones who skipped your colleague's class this time will skip your class next time and somehow, magically, fail to graduate again.

I've had one guy manage to fail science for teachers twice for the same nonsense of just not coming to class and not handing in a final project on time.

I've got a three-peater in my engineering class who likely isn't going to make it again this time, either, for the same problem of not attending enough class to learn the material, not turning in enough homework, and bombing the tests that come directly from the lecture and homework.

Yeah, I've gotten a couple of those in my graduate online class.  You may be right about these (face-to-face undergraduate) students, as well.  Sometimes, you just can't even lead the horse to water.
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People who do not understand numbers should not be allowed to use them for anything. - DvF

MYOB.  Y enseņen bien a sus hijos.
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