• October 31, 2014
October 31, 2014, 8:38:10 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with your Chronicle username and password
News: For all you tweeters, follow The Chronicle on Twitter.
 
Pages: 1 ... 100 101 [102] 103 104 ... 179
  Print  
Author Topic: Plagiarism Chronicles  (Read 462673 times)
wegie
Unemployed & unemployable
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 11,617


« Reply #1515 on: May 06, 2012, 2:50:04 PM »

But then it dawned on me: I just can't believe this kid took the time to change hundreds of words by hand. There must be some kind of software program students can buy that will run material through a thesaurus and change the meaningful words. Has anyone come across such a thing?

I (and every programmer I know) could write a basic one pretty easily.

But I don't have to. There's tons of them out there. :-(

Look for article rewriting or article spinning software.
Logged
barcrossliar
I guess anyone can be a
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 1,350


« Reply #1516 on: May 06, 2012, 3:09:00 PM »

The rule I drum into my students is that if you have 5 words in a row that are the same or synonymous with the source, it's plagiarism.  So auto-swap wouldn't but them much except me spending an extra 30 seconds on Google.
Logged

Every educated person's not a plumb greenhorn.

"where whining mendeth nothing, wherefore whine?"--R.L. Stevenson

+-LR is wise. Listen.
polly_mer
practice makes perfect
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 37,443

Have you worked on that project today?


« Reply #1517 on: May 06, 2012, 3:57:01 PM »

The rule I drum into my students is that if you have 5 words in a row that are the same or synonymous with the source, it's plagiarism.  So auto-swap wouldn't but them much except me spending an extra 30 seconds on Google.

So you're the one! 

I often hear, "But it's not five words in a row that are exactly the same, so it's not plagiarism.  It's my own words!"  Copying paragraphs of material and rearranging the clauses with some thesaurus abuse is still plagiarism, as I'm sure you know but is a hard sell to my students who have latched onto the five-words-in-a-row mantra while neglecting the synonymous-with-the-source part.

Frogfactory, I do suspect a modifying-a-work-for-hire problem.  I've seen multiple drafts of this paper and it doesn't follow the pattern of typical B+ work being revised into an A paper.  I bet I can get the student to fess up when I start quizzing on content since I seriously doubt this student will understand some of the primary arguments.
Logged

I've joined a bizarre cult called JordanCanonicalForm's Witnesses.  I have to go from door to door asking people things like, "Good evening, sir!  Do you have a moment to chat about Linear Transformations?"
barcrossliar
I guess anyone can be a
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 1,350


« Reply #1518 on: May 06, 2012, 5:31:52 PM »

The rule I drum into my students is that if you have 5 words in a row that are the same or synonymous with the source, it's plagiarism.  So auto-swap wouldn't but them much except me spending an extra 30 seconds on Google.

So you're the one! 

I often hear, "But it's not five words in a row that are exactly the same, so it's not plagiarism.  It's my own words!"  Copying paragraphs of material and rearranging the clauses with some thesaurus abuse is still plagiarism, as I'm sure you know but is a hard sell to my students who have latched onto the five-words-in-a-row mantra while neglecting the synonymous-with-the-source part.


Mea culpa; I'm the one.  But you can remind them that I made a big point of the synonym thing.  I agree that exhibit B is plagiarism too, but if you copy whole paragraphs, it gets pretty tough to rearrange everything w/o missing 5 in a row.  I also stress that it's a rule of thumb and they should err on the side of caution.

OTOH, I often see forumites saying things like, "It was only one paragraph in a long paper."  That's a head-banger for me.

Logged

Every educated person's not a plumb greenhorn.

"where whining mendeth nothing, wherefore whine?"--R.L. Stevenson

+-LR is wise. Listen.
frogfactory
Totally Metal
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 10,600


« Reply #1519 on: May 06, 2012, 5:41:20 PM »

So, does anyone have a set of rules for creating plagiarism-proof assignments that I can appropriate without giving due credit?
Logged


At the end of the day, sometimes you just have to masturbate in the bathroom.
galactic_hedgehog
Procrastinating, Python-quoting, Blue Blazer-drinking, chocolate-chip cookie-eating, Pastafarian, Not So
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 19,201

Mind Ninja


WWW
« Reply #1520 on: May 06, 2012, 5:44:23 PM »

So, does anyone have a set of rules for creating plagiarism-proof assignments that I can appropriate without giving due credit?

You mean, you want to plagiarize them?
Logged

frogfactory
Totally Metal
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 10,600


« Reply #1521 on: May 06, 2012, 5:46:33 PM »

So, does anyone have a set of rules for creating plagiarism-proof assignments that I can appropriate without giving due credit?

You mean, you want to plagiarize them?

Absolutely.
Logged


At the end of the day, sometimes you just have to masturbate in the bathroom.
polly_mer
practice makes perfect
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 37,443

Have you worked on that project today?


« Reply #1522 on: May 06, 2012, 8:26:08 PM »

So, does anyone have a set of rules for creating plagiarism-proof assignments that I can appropriate without giving due credit?

If I had such things, then I would gladly share them.  I've even seen plagiarized essays for "what I did last weekend" and "the life experience that means the most to me".

In one daring episode, I was lucky enough to have a friend share with me how students had managed to plagiarize in-class essays by memorizing articles from the reading and then repeating them verbatim in response to writing prompts.  That was easy to catch, but I had to join my friend in laughing at students who copy from the assigned reading and then expect to not be caught.
Logged

I've joined a bizarre cult called JordanCanonicalForm's Witnesses.  I have to go from door to door asking people things like, "Good evening, sir!  Do you have a moment to chat about Linear Transformations?"
dr_alcott
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 10,320


« Reply #1523 on: May 06, 2012, 8:40:29 PM »

So, does anyone have a set of rules for creating plagiarism-proof assignments that I can appropriate without giving due credit?

I'm not sure if this is the kind of thing you're looking for, but here are some guidelines that you probably already know about:

--Create assignments that aren't easily found on a paper mill site. For example, require students to quote/paraphrase/summarize an assigned reading or two.
--If it jives with your syllabus, allow late assignments, with a penalty and for a limited number of days, to ward off the plagiarism that results from last-minute panic.
--Remind them (again) not to plagiarize; include in your rubric language that makes it clear that lack of citation and/or quotation marks IS plagiarism.
--Remind them that you're VERY good at catching plagiarism; make consequences clear (again). Scare them. 

Not rules, exactly, and all stuff that's been talked about on this thread and elsewhere.
Logged

You must be your own snow, Dr_Alcott.  You must lift, and sparkle, and then melt away.

I love everyone here!
mended_drum
Potnia theron and
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 9,477


« Reply #1524 on: May 06, 2012, 11:26:30 PM »


--If it jives with your syllabus, allow late assignments, with a penalty and for a limited number of days, to ward off the plagiarism that results from last-minute panic.


I've been following this one for a decade, but I might have to stop.  Almost every other member of my department has a flat "no late papers" rule, with exceptions only with documentation.  As a result, my assignments are always the last ones my majors complete, and I'm getting a quarter to a third of the class turning in work late which plays havoc with my schedule.  I've rearranged due dates to no avail.  At the very least, I'm going to have to up the penalty somehow.

Bleh.  I'm going to spend the summer figuring out a new approach.
Logged

"dr. mended_drum don't give a sh!t; she will chew me up like a cobra."
barcrossliar
I guess anyone can be a
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 1,350


« Reply #1525 on: May 07, 2012, 8:04:04 AM »

So, does anyone have a set of rules for creating plagiarism-proof assignments that I can appropriate without giving due credit?

I'm not sure if this is the kind of thing you're looking for, but here are some guidelines that you probably already know about:

--Create assignments that aren't easily found on a paper mill site. For example, require students to quote/paraphrase/summarize an assigned reading or two.
--If it jives with your syllabus, allow late assignments, with a penalty and for a limited number of days, to ward off the plagiarism that results from last-minute panic.
--Remind them (again) not to plagiarize; include in your rubric language that makes it clear that lack of citation and/or quotation marks IS plagiarism.
--Remind them that you're VERY good at catching plagiarism; make consequences clear (again). Scare them. 

Not rules, exactly, and all stuff that's been talked about on this thread and elsewhere.


Scaffolding is helpful: Topic due date 1, this part due date 2, etc.  Keeps students on pace for success, plus it's unlikely that they can plagiarize all the lead-up steps.
Logged

Every educated person's not a plumb greenhorn.

"where whining mendeth nothing, wherefore whine?"--R.L. Stevenson

+-LR is wise. Listen.
dr_alcott
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 10,320


« Reply #1526 on: May 07, 2012, 10:02:49 AM »

So, does anyone have a set of rules for creating plagiarism-proof assignments that I can appropriate without giving due credit?

I'm not sure if this is the kind of thing you're looking for, but here are some guidelines that you probably already know about:

--Create assignments that aren't easily found on a paper mill site. For example, require students to quote/paraphrase/summarize an assigned reading or two.
--If it jives with your syllabus, allow late assignments, with a penalty and for a limited number of days, to ward off the plagiarism that results from last-minute panic.
--Remind them (again) not to plagiarize; include in your rubric language that makes it clear that lack of citation and/or quotation marks IS plagiarism.
--Remind them that you're VERY good at catching plagiarism; make consequences clear (again). Scare them. 

Not rules, exactly, and all stuff that's been talked about on this thread and elsewhere.


Scaffolding is helpful: Topic due date 1, this part due date 2, etc.  Keeps students on pace for success, plus it's unlikely that they can plagiarize all the lead-up steps.

Oh, good one. This really helps too.
Logged

You must be your own snow, Dr_Alcott.  You must lift, and sparkle, and then melt away.

I love everyone here!
usukprof
Not sure he's been around long enough to really be a
Member-Moderator
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 10,607

.


« Reply #1527 on: May 07, 2012, 10:09:17 AM »

I also do this to help flow control so the term papers or final project reports aren't done at the last minute.  Milestones are:
1. Two 1/2 page ideas with 2 refs each
2. 1-2 page proposal on selected idea with 5 refs
3. Full outline
4. Draft paper
5. Final
In addition to getting most citation style issues sorted early, grading the final papers is noticeably less painful than before I required the milestones.  While I don't assign a numerical grade for the milestones, I call them mandatory and make it sound like the entire paper will be graded down.  They occasionally are late, but I've always gotten them.  These are in my graduate courses, which probably helps.
Logged

Fat, drunk, and stupid is no way to go through life, son.  --Dean Vernon Wormer
canuckois
Thrower of Insults, Smearer of Characters, and a
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 2,745


« Reply #1528 on: May 07, 2012, 11:57:17 AM »

So, does anyone have a set of rules for creating plagiarism-proof assignments that I can appropriate without giving due credit?

I'm not sure if this is the kind of thing you're looking for, but here are some guidelines that you probably already know about:

--Create assignments that aren't easily found on a paper mill site. For example, require students to quote/paraphrase/summarize an assigned reading or two.
--If it jives with your syllabus, allow late assignments, with a penalty and for a limited number of days, to ward off the plagiarism that results from last-minute panic.
--Remind them (again) not to plagiarize; include in your rubric language that makes it clear that lack of citation and/or quotation marks IS plagiarism.
--Remind them that you're VERY good at catching plagiarism; make consequences clear (again). Scare them. 

Not rules, exactly, and all stuff that's been talked about on this thread and elsewhere.


Scaffolding is helpful: Topic due date 1, this part due date 2, etc.  Keeps students on pace for success, plus it's unlikely that they can plagiarize all the lead-up steps.

Chime.
Logged

Your opinions are welcome, of course, unless they suck, in which case the Fora will reward you with snark, if all goes well.
polly_mer
practice makes perfect
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 37,443

Have you worked on that project today?


« Reply #1529 on: May 07, 2012, 4:27:06 PM »

I would put this in Classroom Victories, but I think it belongs over here.

This is the last week of classes and part of science for teachers is small group review where the groups discuss a unit we've covered and then submit a few important points for a grade.  One group contains a student I'll call P3 in a nod to Anakin's recent "favorite" conversation.  I am sitting roughly three feet away from P1 and possibly five feet away from P3 doing some work on the instructor computer in the classroom, so I had a front row seat for:

P1: Hey!  You're just reading out of the textbook and omitting a few words at a time.  P2, stop writing; P3 is making us plagiarize!

P3: That's not plagiarism.  Plagiarism is copying the whole thing.

P2: What?!  No!!!  Omitting a few words or doing a minor rearrangement is so plagiarism.

This conversation continued for a good fifteen minutes as P1, P2, and P4 give fabulous examples of the difference between summarizing and plagiarizing, paraphrasing and plagiarizing, sampling music and plagiarizing, and using a fact versus stealing someone else's particular statement of that fact.

I was incredibly proud of P1, P2, and P4.  By the end of the conversation, P3 grudging said, "Fine, I learned something about plagiarism, but I still don't believe it's wrong."  I then was in charge of explaining why plagiarism is wrong.  After I explained that, by P3's argument, I could take the paper he submitted to me, add two sentences, and then publish it under my own name to vast acclaim with invitations to speak around the world for his work, P3 did grudgingly admit that he wouldn't like that situation and maybe plagiarism isn't just professors being hardasses for no reason.
Logged

I've joined a bizarre cult called JordanCanonicalForm's Witnesses.  I have to go from door to door asking people things like, "Good evening, sir!  Do you have a moment to chat about Linear Transformations?"
Pages: 1 ... 100 101 [102] 103 104 ... 179
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.9 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
  • 1255 Twenty-Third St., N.W.
  • Washington, D.C. 20037
subscribe today

Get the insight you need for success in academe.