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Author Topic: Adapting the CV  (Read 29402 times)
frogfactory
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« Reply #45 on: November 03, 2012, 12:25:38 PM »

I do - well, two.  One for editing/writing type stuff and one research tech/academic one.

How would you judge when to leave demos on or off, Polly?  I don't know where the line is at all.
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polly_mer
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Have you worked on that project today?


« Reply #46 on: November 04, 2012, 8:33:01 AM »

I do - well, two.  One for editing/writing type stuff and one research tech/academic one.

No, you want one with literally everything that you might want someday: presentations of all kinds including talking to the lab group, teaching of all kinds, publications of all kinds, demos, outreach, attendance at workshops, committee work, or anything else that someone might accept as evidence that you are preparing for a new career and have at least training if not actual experience.  If you have the big list with all the details ready to cut and paste, then your life as the semi-freelancer applying to all kinds of things will be easier.  If you add the things you do to the list in the appropriate categories within a week or so of doing them, then the list builds itself and you will be grateful to yourself for your foresight.

Having two templates for common applications is a great start, but you do want to have the master list.  I obtained my current job by doing things that are unusual for people with my credentials and having a CV that illustrated my fit.

How would you judge when to leave demos on or off, Polly?  I don't know where the line is at all.

Think about what a particular job likely will entail.  Will demos be a net plus (put them on), a net minus (leave them off), or a neutral (how long is the rest of the resume for this one?  Is this a liberal place where one will be a jack-of-all-trades or are the job duties clearly outlined?)?

For example, if you will be writing alone by yourself after interviewing high-level scientists doing cutting-edge research in high energy physics, cancer mechanisms, or similar endeavors, mentioning your skills at doing demos is weird.

If you will be in charge of recruitment and outreach for a science program, then your experience doing demos may be a plus; put them on  the CV and mention your experience talking with the general public about science.

If most of your job will be interacting with young students in a pre-college setting, put the demos in.

If most of your job will be interacting with professional scientists to get their take on policy implications and then writing about it, then leave the demos off.
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frogfactory
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« Reply #47 on: November 04, 2012, 12:24:43 PM »

Hmm.  Well, I'll add it to the master CV.  I imagine it'll be irrelevant for most of what I've been applying for.  But I might mention it at the interview next week if it comes up.  They know I'm not working right now, so it might help to demonstrate that I haven't just been sitting on my arse watching TV.
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frogfactory
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« Reply #48 on: November 16, 2012, 9:24:10 AM »

I guess I can officially claim to have left academia!  My offer was for one of the first jobs I applied for, with the first iteration of my non-academic CV.  It was also one of the positions I was most interested in, and initially pays about as much as a junior post-doc in biomedical sciences.  Score!
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busyslinky
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« Reply #49 on: November 16, 2012, 9:28:52 AM »

Congratulations.
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recovering_academic
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« Reply #50 on: November 16, 2012, 12:21:20 PM »

Congrats - welcome to the rest of your life
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frogfactory
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« Reply #51 on: November 25, 2012, 9:00:53 AM »

I'm trying to decide whether to attend this.  It's a little pricey (since I'm not yet drawing a salary), and I'm a little concerned that it's possibly too trivial to go on the CV.  Any thoughts?
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polly_mer
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Have you worked on that project today?


« Reply #52 on: November 25, 2012, 9:40:42 AM »

I'm trying to decide whether to attend this.  It's a little pricey (since I'm not yet drawing a salary), and I'm a little concerned that it's possibly too trivial to go on the CV.  Any thoughts?

Oh, it's definitely too trivial to go on a CV.  A better question is whether you will learn things that will make your writing better and whether you can get some networking done.  I tend to err on the side of going to these things because I find them helpful.  If you are thinking like a ticket puncher (how does this look on my CV) instead of a student (what can I learn?), then don't go. 
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I've joined a bizarre cult called JordanCanonicalForm's Witnesses.  I have to go from door to door asking people things like, "Good evening, sir!  Do you have a moment to chat about Linear Transformations?"
frogfactory
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« Reply #53 on: November 25, 2012, 10:04:17 AM »

I'm trying to decide whether to attend this.  It's a little pricey (since I'm not yet drawing a salary), and I'm a little concerned that it's possibly too trivial to go on the CV.  Any thoughts?

Oh, it's definitely too trivial to go on a CV.  A better question is whether you will learn things that will make your writing better and whether you can get some networking done.  I tend to err on the side of going to these things because I find them helpful.  If you are thinking like a ticket puncher (how does this look on my CV) instead of a student (what can I learn?), then don't go. 

Yeah, I'm not sure.  I'm actually fairly good at science writing for lay audiences, and have had a decent amount of training in it, so it's hard to know how much this thing will add to my skill set.  It could be really helpful and eye opening, or it could be incredibly dull. 

I'll think on it until I have money coming in tomorrow.  The other factor is that going to talks and classes and so forth is a good way to stay busy, engaged, and happy through the last week of unemployment.

Hmm.
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polly_mer
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Have you worked on that project today?


« Reply #54 on: November 25, 2012, 10:13:11 AM »

If you've already got experience in the area, then give this a pass.  A three-hour seminar to a general audience is unlikely to be very useful to you.  A two-day or week-long workshop where your writing is critiqued and revised is more likely to be useful.
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I've joined a bizarre cult called JordanCanonicalForm's Witnesses.  I have to go from door to door asking people things like, "Good evening, sir!  Do you have a moment to chat about Linear Transformations?"
frogfactory
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« Reply #55 on: November 25, 2012, 10:44:45 AM »

Like I say, I'm going to think on it.  It may be worth it in terms of entertainment and meeting people (if not actual professional networking) as much as anything.  I've spent most of today so far signing up to attend a bunch of talks, networking/mentoring sessions and seminars - mostly free - over the next couple of months.

Did I mention that I'm happy to be back in London?
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polly_mer
practice makes perfect
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Have you worked on that project today?


« Reply #56 on: November 25, 2012, 11:51:49 AM »

Frogfactory, I'm going to give you unsolicited advice and you can do what you like.  Going to talks and seminars is fun, but if you want to be a writer, then you must write and you must make an effort to get that writing seen.  Publication is best, but a blog with regular solid entries is better than nothing.  Write!

I will also make a snarky comment that you can immediately dismiss: DC has talks, networking/mentoring sessions, and seminars.  If you didn't find them on a regular basis, then you didn't look hard enough and focused on DC not being London.  I wasn't close enough to go to those one-time events on a regular basis, but I did get tons of advertisements for them.
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I've joined a bizarre cult called JordanCanonicalForm's Witnesses.  I have to go from door to door asking people things like, "Good evening, sir!  Do you have a moment to chat about Linear Transformations?"
frogfactory
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« Reply #57 on: November 25, 2012, 12:02:11 PM »

Frogfactory, I'm going to give you unsolicited advice and you can do what you like.  Going to talks and seminars is fun, but if you want to be a writer, then you must write and you must make an effort to get that writing seen.  Publication is best, but a blog with regular solid entries is better than nothing.  Write!

I will also make a snarky comment that you can immediately dismiss: DC has talks, networking/mentoring sessions, and seminars.  If you didn't find them on a regular basis, then you didn't look hard enough and focused on DC not being London.  I wasn't close enough to go to those one-time events on a regular basis, but I did get tons of advertisements for them.

I looked, didn't find much.  I actually had a conversation with Alan Leshner in which he commented that the UK was way better for sci comms and engagement and AAAS was trying to learn from us.  Even now, looking at what DC has to offer, it's pretty poor.  There's certainly no Dana Centre or RS there, let alone more career oriented stuff.

I don't know that I want to be a writer, but I do want to be in science publishing and communications.  I still feel that a personal blog would be frivolous and narcissistic, but I've been explicitly told that taking over the blog of the journal I'm about to start working for is a very real possibility.  I would be much more comfortable with blogging in that capacity, and plan to pursue that opportunity seriously.

Edit: I'm also going to the UK science blogging awards night tonight.  That should be interesting and informative.
« Last Edit: November 25, 2012, 12:05:55 PM by frogfactory » Logged


At the end of the day, sometimes you just have to masturbate in the bathroom.
frogfactory
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« Reply #58 on: January 31, 2013, 8:24:11 AM »

Just been reading through a posting for a job as admin for a large, reasonably prestigious clinical research group.  I'm currently contacting people who would be appropriate references, but wanted to check if Polly and DvF (or anyone else) would pour scorn on the idea.  It pays well, is in the right location, and I appear to tick all the boxes.  I don't know if it's a brilliant gateway job, but it's possible there would be networking opportunities and/or time to freelance in more communication-oriented stuff.
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daniel_von_flanagan
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Works all day. Posts all night. Needs sleep.


« Reply #59 on: February 01, 2013, 10:07:28 PM »

Just been reading through a posting for a job as admin for a large, reasonably prestigious clinical research group.  I'm currently contacting people who would be appropriate references, but wanted to check if Polly and DvF (or anyone else) would pour scorn on the idea.  It pays well, is in the right location, and I appear to tick all the boxes.  I don't know if it's a brilliant gateway job, but it's possible there would be networking opportunities and/or time to freelance in more communication-oriented stuff.
If you tick all the boxes, there's no reason not to apply.  We hire non-PhDs for project coordinators all the time: the important credentials are the administrative ones, but if the person has done graduate research in a similar field (even without the actual degree) this is icing on the cake. - DvF
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