• November 1, 2014
November 01, 2014, 1:16:30 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with your Chronicle username and password
News: For all you tweeters, follow The Chronicle on Twitter.
 
Pages: [1] 2
  Print  
Author Topic: Barf or scarf?--gross Thanksgiving  (Read 9059 times)
fiona
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 14,076


« on: November 22, 2012, 3:33:53 PM »

http://www.salon.com/2012/11/22/grossest_thanksgiving_recipes/

Do share your gross recipes, memories, or fantasies about Thanksgiving meals.

Or discuss rules of the day, such as "Do not throw forks."

The Fiona
Logged

The Fiona or Them FionŠ or Fiona the Sublime

Professor of Thread Killing, Fiork University
chaosbydesign
"Are you alive?"
Member-Moderator
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 21,918

Whatever your problem is, it's probably my fault.


« Reply #1 on: November 22, 2012, 3:54:45 PM »

Some of the recipes on that list look tasty! I'd make the turkey stuffed with ham, roasted green chiles and brie.

Logged

I am expressing multiple attitudes simultaneously sir. To which one are you referring? -- Spock
yellowtractor
Vice-Provost of the University of the South-East Corner of Donkeyshire (formerly Donkeyshire Polytechnic) (a Post-1992 University) and also a
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 19,592


« Reply #2 on: November 22, 2012, 3:55:52 PM »

Many, many years ago, TractorMother was ill--not morbidly so, but hospitalized.  For Thanksgiving dinner, TractorFather bought a heat-and-serve La Choy chop suey entree, which he placed in the oven without removing the transparent plastic sheet.  Which of course melted all over the chop suey, and which TractorSiblings and I were not entirely aware of until several bites in.
Logged

It is, of course, possible that what I remember as terror was only a love too great to bear.
oldfullprof
Ridiculous
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 11,359

Representation is not reproduction!


« Reply #3 on: November 22, 2012, 4:07:27 PM »

Why I don't like Thanksgiving food, even normal Thanksgiving food, except the desserts.
Logged

Taste o' the Sixties
academic_cog
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 1,261


WWW
« Reply #4 on: November 22, 2012, 5:09:36 PM »

Turkey with chipotle cheddar sweet potatoes and poblano green gravy sounds fine, if not particularly thanksgiving-y.

I was waiting for someone to mention our tacky family tradition: canned cranberries eased out of the container on a plate, still in log form with the wavy indentations on the sides. Not bad tasting, but with absolutely no sense of presentation.
Logged

Duct tape is so often the solution. I'm Team Academic_Cog.
melba_frilkins
Doing laundry.
Member-Moderator
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 17,469


« Reply #5 on: November 22, 2012, 5:11:15 PM »

Why I don't like Thanksgiving food, even normal Thanksgiving food, except the desserts.

I don't even like pumpkin pie (unless it's made from scratch from non-canned pumpkin).
Logged

Light up the corners of your neighborhood with disco balls matched with dancing green and violet beams.
fiona
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 14,076


« Reply #6 on: November 22, 2012, 7:10:52 PM »

Until I was an adult, I assumed cranberries were raised and packaged in a cylindrical can shape.

I didn't mind learning that the Easter Bunny was a fraud, but seeing cranberries not in the canned shape was a shock from which I am still trying to recover.

The Fiona
Logged

The Fiona or Them FionŠ or Fiona the Sublime

Professor of Thread Killing, Fiork University
egilson
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 3,663


« Reply #7 on: November 22, 2012, 8:01:40 PM »

There's always the day after: "turkey tetrazzini" made with overcooked Creamette's spaghetti noodles, canned cream of mushroom soup and canned peas. All the leftover dressing in the world could not make up for it (not that there was any leftover dressing by supper time on Friday).
Logged
marigolds
looks far too young to be a
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 11,623

i had fun once and it was awful


« Reply #8 on: November 22, 2012, 10:10:08 PM »

There's always the day after: "turkey tetrazzini" made with overcooked Creamette's spaghetti noodles, canned cream of mushroom soup and canned peas. All the leftover dressing in the world could not make up for it (not that there was any leftover dressing by supper time on Friday).

No matter how many pans of dressing one makes, there is never any left by supper time on Friday.
Logged

They are our servants.  They are like dogs.  Sometimes, they think they remember being wolves, but they are only dreaming.
mystictechgal
Happy in my "full, rich adulthood", and as a
Member-Moderator
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 16,280

One step at a time


« Reply #9 on: November 23, 2012, 3:58:59 PM »

My favorite memory was one of the first Thanksgiving's with my in-laws. They'd just gotten their first microwave and decided to microwave the turkey. (Yes, this can be done successfully. I've done it many times.) They knew they had to turn the bird ever every 15 minutes, and my MIL did so, assiduously. Unbeknownst to her or anyone else, my FIL, who never messed in kitchen affairs, also did so. When it was time for dinner half the bird was as hard as a cement block; the other half was almost completely raw. I think we cooked up some hamburgers or something, but there was no turkey served that Thanksgiving meal.

Hmmm... Thinking back, that may have been the last year they had Thanksgiving at their house. My BIL's and SIL started celebrating with their own in-laws, and I started having my in-laws and father to our house for dinner.
Logged

Quote
You must realize that a university cannot educate you. You must do that for yourself, although a college or university is the place where it is likely that you can study most efficiently.
http://www.lhup.edu/~dsimanek/chapman.htm

"Is all the same, only different" -- HL
lucy_
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 2,460


« Reply #10 on: November 24, 2012, 2:21:14 PM »

No wonder diabetes runs in my family:  mashed sweet potato casserole with more brown sugar than sweet potatoes, then topped with more sugar in the form of toasted marshmallows.

cranberry "sauce", jellied (no berries) from the can.

canned green beans (thank goodness they didn't make matters worse by adding in a can of mushroom soup and those crunchy onion bits from a can).

plain white bread stuffing, a soggy greasy mess.

pumpkin pie in a God awful dry crust. Growing up, I thought I didn't like pie. I just didn't like my mother's crust, which, BTW, she used to rave about. No one had the heart to tell her.......no.

Thanksgiving 1950s-1970s style.

thank goodness our Thanksgivings have grown up. And yet, as a kid, not knowing any better, loved it all, well, most of it.

Logged
madhatter
We proudly present the fora's Least
Member-Moderator
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 8,100

Just killing time


« Reply #11 on: November 26, 2012, 11:22:34 AM »

Not really gross, but creepy...

One year in the '70s, nobody in my family wanted to host Thanksgiving. The local Sheraton was serving Thanksgiving dinner for families, so we signed up. I vividly recall being ushered into the big ballroom, which was set up with about two hundred rectangular dining tables in orderly rows. All the families sat down and dinner was served family-style. They brought out two hundred turkeys, set them at the head of the tables, and two hundred fathers simultaneously stood there and carved.

It was like a Moonie mass Thanksgiving. Even as a kid, I found that nightmarish.
Logged

"I may be an evil scientist, but it doesn't take a degree purchased from the Internet with your ex-wife's money to know how special and important you are to me." -- Dr. Doofenschmirtz
melba_frilkins
Doing laundry.
Member-Moderator
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 17,469


« Reply #12 on: November 26, 2012, 3:25:04 PM »

Not really gross, but creepy...

One year in the '70s, nobody in my family wanted to host Thanksgiving. The local Sheraton was serving Thanksgiving dinner for families, so we signed up. I vividly recall being ushered into the big ballroom, which was set up with about two hundred rectangular dining tables in orderly rows. All the families sat down and dinner was served family-style. They brought out two hundred turkeys, set them at the head of the tables, and two hundred fathers simultaneously stood there and carved.

It was like a Moonie mass Thanksgiving. Even as a kid, I found that nightmarish.

Absolutely haunting.
Logged

Light up the corners of your neighborhood with disco balls matched with dancing green and violet beams.
marigolds
looks far too young to be a
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 11,623

i had fun once and it was awful


« Reply #13 on: November 26, 2012, 3:28:49 PM »

Not really gross, but creepy...

One year in the '70s, nobody in my family wanted to host Thanksgiving. The local Sheraton was serving Thanksgiving dinner for families, so we signed up. I vividly recall being ushered into the big ballroom, which was set up with about two hundred rectangular dining tables in orderly rows. All the families sat down and dinner was served family-style. They brought out two hundred turkeys, set them at the head of the tables, and two hundred fathers simultaneously stood there and carved.

It was like a Moonie mass Thanksgiving. Even as a kid, I found that nightmarish.

Absolutely haunting.

It reminds me of that scene in A Wrinkle in Time where all the kids are bouncing identical red balls in unison all up and down the street.  Shudder.
Logged

They are our servants.  They are like dogs.  Sometimes, they think they remember being wolves, but they are only dreaming.
cyano
Senior member
****
Posts: 372


« Reply #14 on: December 01, 2012, 12:26:30 AM »

No matter how many pans of dressing one makes, there is never any left by supper time on Friday.

Come to my house or I'll even mail you my stuffing. I have never figured out why anyone would ruin a perfectly good turkey by sticking chopped up bread in it. Unfortunately, I'm the only one in the house of that opinion.
Logged
Pages: [1] 2
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.9 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
  • 1255 Twenty-Third St., N.W.
  • Washington, D.C. 20037
subscribe today

Get the insight you need for success in academe.