• August 23, 2016

Chronicle Forums

August 24, 2016, 12:49:28 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please Log In to participate in forums.
News: For all you tweeters, follow The Chronicle on Twitter.
 
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10
 1 
 on: Today at 12:44:09 am 
Started by figee - Last post by mountainguy
Q: How did your summer class on the 10 Plagues of Egypt go?

A: At first I was afraid, I was petrified.

 2 
 on: Today at 12:38:50 am 
Started by kang6104 - Last post by kang6104
I had a problem with my pupils were stubborn and unruly, how to keep him conscious and want the same according to my ?

https://qncjellygamatkangacepherbal.wordpress.com/

 3 
 on: Today at 12:38:01 am 
Started by figee - Last post by helpful
Q. Why did you flunk out Donnie Drumpf from his program?

A. Elevate the miracles and you will find the frogs.

 4 
 on: Yesterday at 11:48:26 pm 
Started by screenname1 - Last post by mended_drum

I do not consider making a student go to the disabilities office to be particularly burdensome.  (Really, trek?  you sound like one of those commercials for some stupid gadget - the kind that shows a woman struggling with a cement mixer of mashed potatoes.)  That process is there to make sure the student gets appropriate accommodations in all their classes.  Don't assume that you or the student know what is or isn't appropriate.

You're not thinking about the fact that a lot of students with disabilities cannot easily walk or stand. I know it's hard to empathize with disability if you don't have one, but making a student struggle further is not what accommodation or kindness should be about.

I do know that making a student with disabilities take a long walk, a long stand, or a long wait is not appropriate. It's insensitive.

The Fiona

If by "a long wait" you mean not getting an immediate response sometimes, well, that can't always be helped.  If you're talking about physically, on my campus, at least, that's not a problem.  There are multiple ways to contact the disabilities office, including on-line or by phone, and a student who could not walk to the building would be accommodated by a visit to a different building or office.  But we're a small school, of course.  It really isn't difficult to meet with someone and get the official accommodations here; not a single student (or parent) has described it as burdensome in any way.

Not that we're a utopia:  there are other accessibility problems that need to be fixed.  This just isn't one of them, and it may not be one of them at any number of institutions.

 5 
 on: Yesterday at 11:23:52 pm 
Started by edva3443 - Last post by edva3443
Hello,

I am a recruiter from UStalk.com and we are looking for trial lesson teachers. Our students are Chinese and aged from 5 to 12 years old and we have online classes 1 on 1. If you are interested, please send your CV to teach@ustalk.com and include "trial teaching applicant" in the title.

Requirements:


- Have to be at least 20 years old
- Enjoy working with children
- Classes are Mon-Fri 6-9PM Beijing time
- Weekend time: 12-9PM
- Please prepare 15-20 sec. video introduction of yourself to show your personality and add it to the email
- It is a 3 months part time job starting from September to November

You would need to be teaching at least 12 classes a week and we pay 13$/h.

 6 
 on: Yesterday at 11:14:25 pm 
Started by figee - Last post by darkstarrynight
Q: Why do you wear your sunglasses indoors?

A: The student was too tired from his job to come to class.

 7 
 on: Yesterday at 11:09:03 pm 
Started by voxprincipalis - Last post by geonerd
I expect the article about the Columbia graduate assistant's union will get its own discussion thread. But for now, I'm amused that you can't get "class clown" past the fora censor unless you use trickery, but you can drop F-bombs in an article on the main page.

 8 
 on: Yesterday at 10:59:53 pm 
Started by glowdart - Last post by glowdart
You are describing students like my autistic nephew, who started college this week.  His Facebook posts read as distress signals to me -- but his parents reassure us that all is going well, because they know how to read whether he is in control or needs intervention.  I have learned a lot from watching and listening to him and to them for almost two decades, which has helped me with Asperger's syndrome students -- also on the autism spectrum, but not as severely so as my nephew.  (His campus specializes in a program for more severely autistic students.)

I know that my sibling and sister-in-law have learned a lot from reading books, articles, etc. -- but as much or more from online discussion groups of parents of children with autism.  The parents are well aware of theories and such, but they are looking for and sharing much more specific advice of the sort that you seek, I think.  I wonder if those would be the sort of resource that would be helpful to you?  I imagine there might be threads specific to college students.  There also may be such discussion groups for teachers of students with autism, including at the senior high school level and perhaps even at the college level.  If so, you might search online for such groups, give some a look, and see if such discussions exist . . . or try starting one?



Great idea - thanks! I'll go digging about.

 9 
 on: Yesterday at 10:58:57 pm 
Started by fiona - Last post by protoplasm
Long as we're free associating, I googled up an interesting piece where they explain a histrionic person is like a hurricane.

https://chuckdegroat.net/2011/01/17/dealing-with-difficult-people-histrionics/

The Protoplasm

 10 
 on: Yesterday at 10:56:45 pm 
Started by glowdart - Last post by proftowanda
You are describing students like my autistic nephew, who started college this week.  His Facebook posts read as distress signals to me -- but his parents reassure us that all is going well, because they know how to read whether he is in control or needs intervention.  I have learned a lot from watching and listening to him and to them for almost two decades, which has helped me with Asperger's syndrome students -- also on the autism spectrum, but not as severely so as my nephew.  (His campus specializes in a program for more severely autistic students.)

I know that my sibling and sister-in-law have learned a lot from reading books, articles, etc. -- but as much or more from online discussion groups of parents of children with autism.  The parents are well aware of theories and such, but they are looking for and sharing much more specific advice of the sort that you seek, I think.  I wonder if those would be the sort of resource that would be helpful to you?  I imagine there might be threads specific to college students.  There also may be such discussion groups for teachers of students with autism, including at the senior high school level and perhaps even at the college level.  If so, you might search online for such groups, give some a look, and see if such discussions exist . . . or try starting one?


Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.9 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
  • 1255 Twenty-Third St., N.W.
  • Washington, D.C. 20037
subscribe today

Get the insight you need for success in academe.