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News: Talk about how to cope with chronic illness, disability, and other health issues in the academic workplace.
 
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Author Topic: Finally, I can say "I hate my job."  (Read 29704 times)
manolo
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« Reply #30 on: June 24, 2011, 10:01:20 AM »

Wow, this just sounds like a dysfunctional department--plain and simple. Just out of curiosity, how do your boss and secretary treat others in the department--are they just as oppressive to others, or is this treatment focused just on you? I ask because if you say they have this bizzare working relationship, perhaps this also is the sentiment of many of your colleagues as well?
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maybeitsmebut
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« Reply #31 on: June 24, 2011, 12:34:57 PM »

This question made me stop to think. I actually had to walk outside for awhile to think about this. I do believe others in the department are feeling some similar effects and have many issues with the way it is run here. I think she has made it difficult for many people to do simple things even. Lots of loops and hoops to jump through. BUT, I think this odd dynamic is really me. I am the only person in a position where I am a solid part of the triangle because I am staff and here. The others in the department are either full-time faculty (whole 'nother set of rules and benefits) or the other staff are men techies. They don't have as much interaction with her. With him, yes, and they are miserable with him passing his responsibilities onto them. Rather than exercise power, he will pass it to the powerless and something simple takes forever, if it ever gets done. No, really.
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univ_librarian
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« Reply #32 on: June 28, 2011, 12:44:30 PM »

As another poster said, a certain amount of dysfunction exists in every organization-public, private, academic and non academic.  Every organization has its own set of dynamics and political landmines.  (It is always amazing to hear people think all people in the corporate world are promoted solely on the basis of merit-not!!)

If you have determined your environment is no longer tolerable, then do whatever you need to do to leave it.  Actually looking for and applying for jobs will make you feel better about your current situation.  If you keep applying, you are bound to find something else.  In the meantime, you still have a job (unlike so many people that are unemployed and looking) and you can tell yourself that you are working towards something better.  If you continue to sit there and be miserable, your misery will come out-no matter how well you think you are hiding it.  Once your boss knows you are miserable, there is no going back from that impression.
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maybeitsmebut
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« Reply #33 on: July 18, 2011, 10:51:50 AM »

Another quick question as I start my plan to move. How do I handle the salary conversation considering I accepted my current position at under 40k and have been at this rate for 5 years at the current job and about 3 years in previous jobs before having ANY college degrees and now I have three and working on a fourth.

I accepted it in this position because I was working on other things, including going to school for the entire time, even though I felt I was grossly underpaid. Now that I am re-entering the job market I want my worth which is almost double this amount.

So, how do I handle this conversation?
My assumption is that the new salary will depend heavily on the previous amount.
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madhatter
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« Reply #34 on: July 18, 2011, 1:24:16 PM »

It's possible that the premise of the salary conversation will be "what did you make at your last job?"

You have to change that premise to "what is the equitable salary for the position you are filling?"
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"I may be an evil scientist, but it doesn't take a degree purchased from the Internet with your ex-wife's money to know how special and important you are to me." -- Dr. Doofenschmirtz
maybeitsmebut
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« Reply #35 on: March 16, 2012, 8:55:49 AM »

You all having given some good advice. I am working on a new CV and instead of starting a new thread I am just posting here again. As I think I've mentioned before, I do not teach courses. I am staff. But, I have filled in to teach classes for teachers who needed to be absent including my chair. In those classes I will either teach the lesson he or she had planned or I can cover a related topic that I feel they need to know. 

How and where do I put that on a CV so that I have teaching experience?
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asco7
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Posts: 13


« Reply #36 on: March 16, 2012, 9:21:29 AM »

These can be described as "invited lectures" -- if it was for a large enough part of the semester, then you could put it under teaching ("2nd half of semester" or some such thing...). Otherwise, invited lecture sounds good...
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maybeitsmebut
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« Reply #37 on: March 16, 2012, 10:06:27 AM »

asco7 - Thank you for the advice. After browsing the "Stupid CV Tricks" thread I thought it best to ask before I do anything...well, stupid. Invited Lectures sounds good. I like it! Thanks again.
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