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Author Topic: So what have you read lately  (Read 964321 times)
alastrina
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« Reply #3705 on: October 30, 2012, 2:13:35 PM »

I have no idea what I've forgotten to post about at this point. Some recent reads have been Heather Graham's Bone Island Trilogy and the newest three of her Krewe of Hunters series. Also Full Body Burden: Growing Up in the Nuclear Shadow of Rocky Flats by Kristen Iversen which has some appalling stories about government neglect and cover up.

I'm currently reading The Violinist's Thumb: And Other Lost Tales of Love, War, and Genius, as Written by Our Genetic Code by Sam Kean (who also wrote The Disappearing Spoon). It's about some of the intricacies of DNA, the stories of its discoveries and the people who research it. I'm not well versed in science but it explains things simply enough for me to understand without dumbing it down.
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"One must always be careful of books," said Tessa, "and what is inside them, for words have the power to change us." -Cassandra Clare, Clockwork Angel
prof_smartypants
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You're getting hosed by small minds with no game.


« Reply #3706 on: November 06, 2012, 9:57:12 PM »

OK. I just finished the Diana Galbadon "Outlander" Series. Don't judge me. I liked it.

So now I need a new book for the first time in months. Here's where I'm leaning:

1) Gone With the Wind. Never read it. Feeling culturally bereft living in the South
2) State of Wonder - Patchett.
3) Angel's Game - Ruiz-Zaifon. Loved Shadow of the Wind.

Thoughts?
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oldfullprof
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« Reply #3707 on: November 06, 2012, 10:33:14 PM »

Sex at Dusk.  It's a very nice correction to Sex at Dawn, but probably makes its claims overmuch (in sort of prudish, triumphalist terms) when trying to mine the qualitative anthropological literature.  It's great at the theoretical level.
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Taste o' the Sixties
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« Reply #3708 on: November 07, 2012, 9:16:12 AM »

prof_smartypants, I loved Outlander! Although, in book three I started getting bored because the narrative became a lot more action-movie-like and less character driven.

I'm about to finish Middlesex... I love it. I'm so glad I gave it another chance (my first try didn't go anywhere).

My next book is Orhan Pamuk's My Name is Red. Since reading Middlesex, I can't get enough of Turkey.
« Last Edit: November 07, 2012, 9:16:31 AM by itried » Logged
sandralong
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« Reply #3709 on: November 07, 2012, 11:22:16 AM »

Has any of you guys read Linchpin by Seth Godin?

This is like the best book ever written. A must read for every living thing on this planet and beyond.

I'm surely going to buy more books of him, anyone has any suggestions for books similar like this?
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llanfair
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« Reply #3710 on: November 07, 2012, 12:16:16 PM »

Currently enjoying Lost to the West: The Forgotten Byzantine Empire that Rescued Western Civilization by Lars Brownworth.  It sparkles.
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voxprincipalis
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« Reply #3711 on: November 08, 2012, 12:24:59 PM »

Just finished Janice Y.K. Lee's The Piano Teacher. If your library has this book, you will be doing them a favor if you take the book out and throw it over a bridge.

VP
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tinyzombie
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« Reply #3712 on: November 08, 2012, 12:30:23 PM »

Just finished Janice Y.K. Lee's The Piano Teacher. If your library has this book, you will be doing them a favor if you take the book out and throw it over a bridge.

VP

This is the best review/warning of anything that I have ever read.
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Quote from: usukprof
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prof_smartypants
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« Reply #3713 on: November 08, 2012, 12:37:18 PM »

Just finished Janice Y.K. Lee's The Piano Teacher. If your library has this book, you will be doing them a favor if you take the book out and throw it over a bridge.

VP

This is the best review/warning of anything that I have ever read.

Indeed.

Vox, I am currently listening to Follet's "World Without End". The Audiobook is something like 42 hours long, and really good. Bang for your buck.
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tinyzombie
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elevate from this point on - chuck d


« Reply #3714 on: November 08, 2012, 12:39:49 PM »

I ran across Jhumpa Lahiri's Unaccustomed Earth in my library's e-book trove last week. It was a delight to sink into, and I'm surprised that I missed it when it was published.

I am slowly savoring Ellen Willis' Out of the Vinyl Deeps : Ellen Willis on Rock Music.
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Quote from: usukprof
I think we have three of them, but the smallest one seems to be the leader.
Quote from: dolljepopp
Who needs real life when Sandra Bullock is around?
Quote from: systeme_d_
You are all my people, and I love you.
dr_alcott
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« Reply #3715 on: November 08, 2012, 12:45:09 PM »

I ran across Jhumpa Lahiri's Unaccustomed Earth in my library's e-book trove last week. It was a delight to sink into, and I'm surprised that I missed it when it was published.

I liked this one too.

I set down Octavia Butler's Kindred to read The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, because one of her Lacks' sons is coming to campus next semester and I want to be ready. What a read.
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bibliothecula
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like Bunnicula, only with books


« Reply #3716 on: November 08, 2012, 12:59:44 PM »

I finished Alif the Unseen by G. Willow Wilson, which was fun, and tried Pratchett's Nation, which was bleh. I think I'm just not a Pratchett person. I read in the NYT BR this weekend that Emma Donoghue has a new book out called Astray, and I'm very excited about that. I love her work.

I liked Kindred, but a couple of weeks ago I read Butler's The Parable of the Sower and it didn't do much for me.
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oldfullprof
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Representation is not reproduction!


« Reply #3717 on: November 08, 2012, 6:00:14 PM »

Sex at Dusk.  It's a very nice correction to Sex at Dawn, but probably makes its claims overmuch (in sort of prudish, triumphalist terms) when trying to mine the qualitative anthropological literature.  It's great at the theoretical level.

Still reading Sex at Dusk. I think Saxon starts to have problems when she starts grabbing parts of the empirical qualitative anthropological research, after making a great theoretical entrance. Much of it seems to project Western prudery onto people who have multipartner cultural arrangements. I tend to believe that the Margaret Mead Samoa type arrangement might have held more sway more of the time. (This in spite of Freemanís badly supported critique of Mead.) I think that Ryan is fairly silly, as Saxon points out, but her approach is marred by a little too much triumphalism and sarcasm (even exclamation points!) Human female genitals seem to be designed for prolonged pleasure a little too much for such prudery to have actually existed on a large scale in multipartner societies. Saxon will later explain involuntary female arousal as a device for protecting a womanís genitals during forced or multiple sex, but this seems a little forced, itself. I think that sex is fairly polyvalent.
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Taste o' the Sixties
voxprincipalis
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« Reply #3718 on: November 08, 2012, 7:53:04 PM »

Vox, I am currently listening to Follet's "World Without End". The Audiobook is something like 42 hours long, and really good. Bang for your buck.

Yes, I loved that! Actually I think that all of the Follett books I've listened to have been excellent. I particularly enjoyed Whiteout (though it's violent, and that's hard to just skip if you're listening) and Night Over Water. Fall of Giants was good too, although a slow starter, and I'm looking forward to the next one in that trilogy, which ought to be released soon.

VP
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sandralong
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« Reply #3719 on: November 09, 2012, 4:30:31 AM »

Anyone a fan of Neil Gaiman? :)
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