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Author Topic: Issue date is 2011, actually pubs in 2012: how to list?  (Read 2102 times)
bibliothecula
Academic ronin
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« on: November 08, 2012, 2:44:14 PM »

I have an article that will come out this month in a journal, but the journal is so behind that the pub date on the issue will read 2011. Do I list the official date as on the journal, but then add in parentheses "actual publication date 2012" or something like that? I don't want to misinform anyone looking at my cv.

Thanks--
Bib
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thehighking
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« Reply #1 on: November 08, 2012, 3:02:34 PM »

Could you do 2011/2012?
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hegemony
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« Reply #2 on: November 08, 2012, 3:10:28 PM »

It doesn't matter when the issue date/publication date is unless you're turning in something like "What I did in 2012."  That is, nobody else cares when exactly anything came out, as long as it has an approximate date on it (so you are not misrepresenting an article from 1995 as a new publication).  If the exact date matters, you write:

"Really Important Article," Journal of High Prestige 20 (2012 for 2011), 42-92.

But my guess is that the exact date doesn't matter, and you should just put what it says on the journal.
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seniorscholar
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« Reply #3 on: November 08, 2012, 3:50:35 PM »

And it's likely that the field expert on the search committee knows that the journal's final 2011 issue is generally available online or in their mailbox by July 2012 -- this is very very common. (One leading journal in my subfield was two years behind -- the January 2007 issue appearing in March 2009, for example -- for several years.)
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hungry_ghost
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« Reply #4 on: November 08, 2012, 4:55:46 PM »

Didn't we just have this thread a couple of weeks ago? See here.

(Also, 2011 for late 2012 does not meet my field's standard for "so behind." 2008 for 2012 is "so behind"!!)
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bibliothecula
Academic ronin
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like Bunnicula, only with books


« Reply #5 on: November 08, 2012, 5:24:35 PM »

Sorry, hungry_ghost, I didn't see that. Thanks for the link.

Thanks, hegemony and seniorscholar.
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pgher
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« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2012, 8:02:24 PM »

I sometimes have the opposite problem--two journals in my field have already "published" their April or May 2013 issues online.  I just list whatever the "official" date is.  I mean, the purpose of giving volume, issue, date, etc. information is so that people can find it.
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flotsam
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« Reply #7 on: November 08, 2012, 10:18:46 PM »

Yes, the other thread answered it, but I would just say that you really must put the actual (bibliographic) information on there, if ever anyone tries to look it up.  Plus, years from now, you may not care as much about 2011 or 2012, but you'll want the article to be found.

I have had a few of these, including one with a 3-yr lag! On my CV, I put the official date, then add a parenthetical like: "(published in January 2012)" after listing article officially published in Summer 2010.
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astoryteller
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« Reply #8 on: November 09, 2012, 2:07:35 PM »

I've had one or two articles like that. I just put the official publication date—the same info I'd put in a footnote or bibliographical entry. That's how people will find it. (Then again, I didn't publish those articles at a time I needed to stress recent accomplishments for jobs/promotions/etc.)
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flotsam
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« Reply #9 on: November 09, 2012, 7:35:09 PM »

I've had one or two articles like that. I just put the official publication date—the same info I'd put in a footnote or bibliographical entry. That's how people will find it. (Then again, I didn't publish those articles at a time I needed to stress recent accomplishments for jobs/promotions/etc.)

Right. I'm thinking of things like annual review reports or tenure/promotion materials, where people may be suprised to see an "old" article being listed. But, yes, in other circumstances or once some time has passed, then I'd remove the parenthetical "(published in YEAR)" note entirely, and stick with the bibliographic info.
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