• October 31, 2014

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October 31, 2014, 4:10:59 PM *
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 1 
 on: Today at 04:03:55 PM 
Started by atalanta - Last post by kaysixteen
Do you  have to accept homework assignments emailed from the athletic cheating office?  Can you not require the lad to bring the work, on paper, to you, and his notes/ scratch paper, whatever, so you can verbally quiz him to assess whether he is actually doing it himself, as seems impossible to believe?

 2 
 on: Today at 03:58:40 PM 
Started by h0tkeys - Last post by crumpet
Good to hear such a happy ending to this part of your tenure process. It sounds like you have a very supportive department, which is wonderful.

My chair screwed up on our promise of when I could go up for early tenure. I made that a condition of accepting my new/current job. Fortunately, we dredged up an old email with the information in it and she agreed to talk to the dean, but this was AFTER she and the dean agreed on an entirely different path for me. I'm a bit grumpy about it as it means I have to push on them to get it through now, which is annoying not only because I worked this out pre-acceptance but also because I have more publications than required for tenure already AND teaching awards...grump.

 3 
 on: Today at 03:57:39 PM 
Started by paddington_bear - Last post by paddington_bear
Peace, Paddington.  You sound majorly stressed.  One step at a time.

That's mostly because I canceled classes today because I was nauseous most of the morning. Not sure if I'm going down with something or not. :) But it's also because I'm really starting to hate this class. I'm not sure what's gone right this semester, but a whole bunch of stuff has gone wrong.  :)

Some semesters are just like that, for no discernible reason. The great thing is that they're over, and you can start the next term with a clean slate. Whatever goes awry is almost never the teacher's fault.

One suggestion I have for future terms: don't give an assignment that isn't due quickly. With term papers, have scaffolding/intermediate assignments. That's to keep the students focused, and keep your aggravation level down.

For now, be good to yourself, tell yourself "This too shall  pass," and know that if we were all in the same city, we Forumites would take you out for lunch and a good drink and some laughter.

The Fiona

Good advice! What I've mostly learned is not to make a campus event part of an assignment. It's not worth trying to figure out what to do for students who can't attend. I was happy to hear that the event would be recorded, so I thought everyone would be able to see the event one way or the other.  But then the recording wasn't available until about 3 weeks after the actual event (which prohibited the peer review I would have done). And now, if it's "uncomprehendable," I'll have to make yet another adjustment.  Sigh.

 4 
 on: Today at 03:47:30 PM 
Started by srpd14 - Last post by camassia
I think Ruralguy and I are really saying the same thing. 

Let me rephrase: Don't waste precious space in your cover letter merely restating the contents of your CV.  If - as I suggested   - you describe the skills you would bring to a particular postdoc position, then of course you cannot do this without referring in your cover letter to your previous experience.  However, I have cover letters sitting in my file right now in which applicants merely repeat CV information such as their degrees, the institutions they attended, papers they have published  etc.  As I said earlier, I can get all this from reading your CV for myself. What I need to see in the cover letter is  a specific description of how you think your skills and knowledge will be useful to my project. Simply reiterating your achievements to date  - no matter how impressive -  does not tell me that.




 5 
 on: Today at 03:46:52 PM 
Started by paddington_bear - Last post by fiona
Peace, Paddington.  You sound majorly stressed.  One step at a time.

That's mostly because I canceled classes today because I was nauseous most of the morning. Not sure if I'm going down with something or not. :) But it's also because I'm really starting to hate this class. I'm not sure what's gone right this semester, but a whole bunch of stuff has gone wrong.  :)

Some semesters are just like that, for no discernible reason. The great thing is that they're over, and you can start the next term with a clean slate. Whatever goes awry is almost never the teacher's fault.

One suggestion I have for future terms: don't give an assignment that isn't due quickly. With term papers, have scaffolding/intermediate assignments. That's to keep the students focused, and keep your aggravation level down.

For now, be good to yourself, tell yourself "This too shall  pass," and know that if we were all in the same city, we Forumites would take you out for lunch and a good drink and some laughter.

The Fiona

 6 
 on: Today at 03:40:12 PM 
Started by paddington_bear - Last post by paddington_bear
Peace, Paddington.  You sound majorly stressed.  One step at a time.

That's mostly because I canceled classes today because I was nauseous overnight and most of the morning. Not sure if I'm going down with something or not. But it's also because I'm really starting to hate this class. I'm not sure what's gone right this semester, but a whole bunch of stuff has gone wrong, or just been annoying.  :)   I've given them reminders off and on, so I'm not sure it's a matter of long-term forgetfulness. With this group, they could easily "forget" from one week to the next, though.

Thanks for the advice everyone!

 7 
 on: Today at 03:37:49 PM 
Started by fiona - Last post by fiona
Evidently this is one of the hot most-mailed pieces today.

I don't know why, but maybe I don't know enough to look for the right things.

Anyway, here it is, and feel free to read and/or  comment:

http://chronicle.com/article/THE-CHRONICLE-OF-HIGHER/1612/

The Fiona

 8 
 on: Today at 03:37:48 PM 
Started by geheimrat - Last post by larryc
OP, take this from someone who has been in your shoes and lost a LOT... In the place you have described, you can either have job security/tenure or you can have high academic standards. You cannot have both.

Lizardmom offers a valuable warning--but it is not necessarily the case. I taught mostly surveys for a dozen years at a open-admissions university. Even with dropping quizzes, weekly assignments to keep people from falling behind, opportunities to rewrite, etc. I had a high DWF rate.

I went to talk to my chair about it and he made it clear that I was not to water down the classes, that such a rate was typical, that he absolutely had my back in such matters, and that there was no pressure from the admin to water down classes. So I did everything I could to help students, recorded the grades they deserved, and was tenured and promoted right on schedule.

This is very much a matter of institutional culture--I was lucky to be at that institution. You need to ask around. Since this is the first year of this terrible policy, try to get a conversation going in your department about how people are dealing with it. Ask your colleagues how they are dealing with the challenges and if they have any advice for you. (People love it when you ask them for advice.) None of us knows what the culture is like at your school.

 9 
 on: Today at 03:36:24 PM 
Started by mirrorcad - Last post by quisenberry
To bring it back to health insurance for a second: the OP should also consider that if the "long-term stable stream" of health insurance is through a partner's employer, companies are increasingly charging a penalty if an employee's partner opts out an employee-sponsored plan. So let's say NewU offers a $150/mo. incentive to waive insurance, what if partner's company starts charging a $200/mo. penalty for the partner to choose a family plan when the OP is eligible for single coverage at NewU? Now you're down $50/mo. (not even considering tax implications)!

DO NOT bring up health insurance at all in negotiation, and then make sure you understand the ramifications of the decision to waive.


 10 
 on: Today at 03:31:34 PM 
Started by jonesey - Last post by fearless_winnower
Sociological Science is absolutely NOT a predatory or scam journal.  It is new and it is open-source, and it operates under a fairly different model, but it is definitely a serious journal.  Most people in the field recognize it -- it made a big initial splash and has been publishing consistently good work for the year or so it's been around.

It is also not, as a previous poster mentioned, an ASA spin-off. ASA is developing its own open-source journal, however. Soc Science *was* however, created partly as a counterweight to ASR's and AJS's ridiculously long reviewer times and some of their editorial practices.

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