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Author Topic: Universiti Brunei Darussalam  (Read 378325 times)
wongtood
Junior member
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Posts: 75


« Reply #195 on: May 03, 2012, 7:24:58 AM »

I thought the SAA was an expert on race relations in Singapore and Malaysia. Maybe he could help convince all parents to accept the MoE Brunei decision to have all children learn Islamic Religious Knowledge in all schools, both government and non-government. He could also suggest the same in Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore. The Borneo region will become a powerful bloc.
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valueadded
New member
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Posts: 9


« Reply #196 on: May 03, 2012, 8:28:43 PM »

Wongtood is so positive in his thinking. This is an excellent idea and UBD must look into this seriously. Well done Wongtood.
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absal
New member
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Posts: 7


« Reply #197 on: May 03, 2012, 8:40:24 PM »

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I thought the SAA was an expert on race relations in Singapore and Malaysia.  

Wrong guy. If the Special Academic Advisor had been an expert on race relations in Singapore and Malaysia, he wouldn't have walked into the minefield of Malay Studies like an elephant in the China shop.

The "expert" is his soon-to-be-appointed crony from back home. After all, if you have good guanxi ("connections"), why advertise jobs in the Chronicle? The Chronicle has become the playground of nefarious characters anyway who seem to congregate on this thread. Much better use your connections and bring in old friends from back home who can be relied upon to play by your rules.

 
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hayy_yaqdhan
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Posts: 12


« Reply #198 on: May 04, 2012, 2:14:30 AM »

Quote
Maybe he could help convince all parents to accept the MoE Brunei decision to have all children learn Islamic Religious Knowledge in all schools, both government and non-government. He could also suggest the same in Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore. The Borneo region will become a powerful bloc.

That's the way the political system works: Remember the sepadu system that integrated secular and religious education in an attempt to Islamise education? When that ran into problems, it was quickly dropped and replaced with the SPN 21 system that went the other way: it introduced previously banned subjects such as fine arts and music and sought to liberalise education. Now the conservatives are getting restless, so religious education is boosted again to placate them. So it goes back and forth. The victims in all this are the students left in confusion between the conflicting demands of religious indoctrination and reflexive pedagogy.
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wongtood
Junior member
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Posts: 75


« Reply #199 on: May 04, 2012, 10:50:47 AM »

I read in the alternative media that Malaysia is the country having problems of racism, religious discrimination, and all kinds of other problems. Is Brunei not the abode of peace, free from all such disturbances? Are there factions vying for power in Brunei too?   
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qrypt
Qryptacular & not really a Member-Moderator
Distinguished Senior Member
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Posts: 6,322

I just LOVE that VOICE. It's so NICE


« Reply #200 on: May 05, 2012, 4:42:20 AM »

Are we not academics?  Would we not be suspicious of claims that a country is an abode of peace, that there are no factions vying for power? 
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"Kick ass! If somebody tries to stop the march to democracy, we will seek them out and kill them! Our will is being tested, but we are resolute. We have a better way. Stay strong! Stay the course! Kill them! Be confident! We are going to wipe them out! We are not blinking!"
hayy_yaqdhan
New member
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Posts: 12


« Reply #201 on: May 06, 2012, 6:04:09 AM »

Quote
Is Brunei not the abode of peace, free from all such disturbances? Are there factions vying for power in Brunei too? 

Quote
Are we not academics?  Would we not be suspicious of claims that a country is an abode of peace, that there are no factions vying for power? 

Anybody who knows Brunei can see that the 'Abode of Peace' facade is only skin deep. It doesn't require a political scientist to figure out who the main players on both sides are. And if you still don't know, you can read about it in the US Embassy cables on wikileaks.
 
One of the main pragmatist protagonists (remember the old Johnny Cash song "A Boy Named Sue" about a boy who was given a girl's name to make him a tough fighter?) confided to the US ambassador in really harsh terms what he thought of the religious dogmatists. The Pehin-Pehin in the Ministry of Religious Affairs are not amused.

Of course, the same Boy-named-Sue Pehin is also the UBD CEO's patron. Both are in urgent need to make up with the conservatives and shore up their religious credentials. At UBD what could be better for that than to establish a nice little Centre for Islamic Studies?
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awg_budiman
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Posts: 14


« Reply #202 on: May 06, 2012, 8:55:02 AM »

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the same Boy-named-Sue Pehin is also the UBD CEO's patron. 

'Patron' or brother-in-law? The family relations are getting a bit complicated here.
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peter_kropotkin
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Posts: 16


« Reply #203 on: May 10, 2012, 2:18:46 AM »

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I read in the alternative media that Malaysia is the country having problems of racism, religious discrimination, and all kinds of other problems. Is Brunei not the abode of peace, free from all such disturbances?

Of course you would read stuff like that in the "alternative media". They are always up to some mischief. If you don't want to hear about racism, discrimination, and other problems just stick to the official media. That's precisely why Brunei is still the "Abode of Peace" - because it doesn't have any alternative media in which dominant modes of representation can be critically examined in the public sphere. 
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wongtood
Junior member
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Posts: 75


« Reply #204 on: May 17, 2012, 1:10:49 AM »

Sorry I've been sick for some time and have not been following the posts. I don't think it's fair to imply nepotism or patronage by the new fledgling admin which is trying it's very best to transform a very slow-moving bureaucracy in Brunei into a dynamic world economy of the 21st Century. There are many entrenched powerful dinosaurs in the system that they have to bersilat with. So, some backs have to be scratched for larger goals. Mere mortals will not understand these macro strategies. Way to go, buat tia!


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obelisk
New member
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Posts: 30


« Reply #205 on: May 18, 2012, 12:57:35 AM »

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I don't think it's fair to imply nepotism or patronage by the new fledgling admin which is trying it's very best to transform a very slow-moving bureaucracy in Brunei into a dynamic world economy of the 21st Century.

Always trying, never succeeding. See also the old UBD motto "striving for academic excellence".
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zulgabe
New member
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Posts: 16


« Reply #206 on: May 18, 2012, 4:45:51 AM »

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Mere mortals will not understand these macro strategies

Wangdude, can you please PM (personal message) me, we need people like you up here in the realm of immortals.
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lurking_sprirt
New member
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Posts: 26


« Reply #207 on: May 18, 2012, 5:32:53 AM »

Quote
I don't think it's fair to imply nepotism or patronage by the new fledgling admin which is trying it's very best to transform a very slow-moving bureaucracy in Brunei into a dynamic world economy of the 21st Century.

Surprise, surprise. It is customary to apologize for nepotism in this manner in Brunei. I guess only when one's toes are trodden on does one call a spade a spade. 
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bangsy
Junior member
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Posts: 82


« Reply #208 on: May 18, 2012, 11:00:16 AM »

Please don't be so unfair to Wangtood. In my estimation he is a practitioner of eironeia bruneiana, an art form that is richly developed in Brunei. It takes its name from the  Greek comedy figure of Eiron, a smart underdog who always outwits his boastful opponent, an impostor who thinks he is great stuff. One finds it in the Letters to the Editor of the Borneo Bulletin, on brudirect.com, I suspect sometimes in some of the articles in the newspapers, and certainly there is a lot of it on this thread. Saying one thing and meaning the opposite assumes a double audience: one that only hears the manifest meaning, and the other that understands the latent meaning. And if you get into trouble, you can always say you didn't mean it and have been misunderstood. It's the perfect adaptive response in a system in which one can't say what one really thinks.
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tong_in_cheek
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Posts: 22


« Reply #209 on: May 20, 2012, 7:57:05 AM »

From an article in the local newspaper, the Borneo Bulletin:

Imams highlight Internet abuse in Friday sermon
"Making slanderous remarks, exposing people's flaws and insulting others ... through the Internet were highlighted in yesterday's Friday sermon.  Making slanderous and defamatory remarks are sinful and prohibited in Islam, it was said. It is worse than killing someone."

So "exposing people's flaws" is the same as insulting, slandering, or defaming them and worse even than murder.

I wonder, does that also include exposing the flaws of the UBD leadership?
« Last Edit: May 20, 2012, 7:58:36 AM by tong_in_cheek » Logged
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