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Author Topic: How to send manuscript to publisher for review  (Read 2646 times)
faber
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« on: April 30, 2012, 3:53:00 PM »

When sending a manuscript to a publisher for review through e-mail, does one send it in pdf form or microsoft word?  I'd prefer to do it in pdf form, but I anticipate that the document size might be too large to send through e-mail.
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yellowtractor
Vice-Provost of the University of the South-East Corner of Donkeyshire (formerly Donkeyshire Polytechnic) (a Post-1992 University) and also a
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« Reply #1 on: April 30, 2012, 4:51:13 PM »

1) See manuscript submission/preparation guidelines on the publisher's website.  Follow.

2) Repeat #1 (just to make sure you've done it right).  Make double-extra-triple sure the publisher accepts unsolicited electronic submissions via e-mail in the first place.

3) When in doubt, .doc, .docx, or .pdf are all generally acceptable formats.
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venerable_bede
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« Reply #2 on: April 30, 2012, 5:25:26 PM »

PDF is the way to ensure that your formatting doesn't get wonky. I use PDFs whenever possible, even when I don't have interesting formatting or graphics or anything. Plus, PDFs are almost always smaller than Word files.
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Every normal man must be tempted at times to spit on his hands, hoist the black flag, and begin to slit throats. --H. L. Mencken
cranefly
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« Reply #3 on: April 30, 2012, 8:14:41 PM »

PDF is the way to ensure that your formatting doesn't get wonky. I use PDFs whenever possible, even when I don't have interesting formatting or graphics or anything. Plus, PDFs are almost always smaller than Word files.


I disagree: The press will likely send the prospectus out for review if they are thinking of picking it up. Reviewers prefer Word doc because they can comment right on the file.  Send a DOC.
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venerable_bede
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« Reply #4 on: April 30, 2012, 10:14:00 PM »

PDF is the way to ensure that your formatting doesn't get wonky. I use PDFs whenever possible, even when I don't have interesting formatting or graphics or anything. Plus, PDFs are almost always smaller than Word files.


I disagree: The press will likely send the prospectus out for review if they are thinking of picking it up. Reviewers prefer Word doc because they can comment right on the file.  Send a DOC.


Well sure, if they ask for Word docs, I send Word docs. If they say Word doc or PDF, I send PDF.
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Every normal man must be tempted at times to spit on his hands, hoist the black flag, and begin to slit throats. --H. L. Mencken
seniorscholar
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« Reply #5 on: May 01, 2012, 1:43:58 PM »

As yellowtractor said some time ago -- look at the publisher's website or contact the editor that invited you to send your manuscript: different publishers have different preferences, and only they know their own choices. Don't mess around guessing or using what someone here has told you, since that someone only knows what some press has done in their own case.

Ignoring the instructions on the publisher's website is an outstanding way to get off on a very wrong foot with that publisher.

(I've recently been outside reader for a special issue of a journal to which potential contributors were asked to submit essays of 5,000-8,000 words and to include a word count. The easiest way to deal with 28-page single-spaced manuscripts in pdf with no word count and no easy way to have the computer count the words? Put them immediately in the round file: there were many more submissions than could be printed, so why waste time on people who can't follow directions.)

P.S. 28 pages single spaced is bound to be at least 11,000 words and probably more.
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seniorscholar
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« Reply #6 on: May 01, 2012, 1:44:29 PM »

As yellowtractor said some time ago -- look at the publisher's website or contact the editor that invited you to send your manuscript: different publishers have different preferences, and only they know their own choices. Don't mess around guessing or using what someone here has told you, since that someone only knows what some press has done in their own case.

Ignoring the instructions on the publisher's website is an outstanding way to get off on a very wrong foot with that publisher.

(I've recently been outside reader for a special issue of a journal to which potential contributors were asked to submit essays of 5,000-8,000 words and to include a word count. The easiest way to deal with 28-page single-spaced manuscripts in pdf with no word count and no easy way to have the computer count the words? Put them immediately in the round file: there were many more submissions than could be printed, so why waste time on people who can't follow directions.)

P.S. 28 pages single spaced is bound to be at least 11,000 words and probably more.
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