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Author Topic: Recently Laid Off...  (Read 7474 times)
mswhitneycee
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« on: April 07, 2012, 11:38:48 AM »

Hello everyone. I am 26 years old and was just laid off on Wednesday from my job/position at a university after only working there for 4 months. It was a brand new position, but due to my supervisors not giving the Dean clear roles for me, my position was cut to save money. Sad, but I'm fine. I'm choosing to NOT let this knock me down.

I have applied to over 30 jobs thus far within higher education; recruiting, academic advising, assistant director, admissions, college access advising, and even part-time work within community colleges with student services.

I was just accepted into an online MBA program at University of Houston-Victoria late last month (to diversify myself).
The day after I got laid off, I just invited for an interview for the doctoral program I applied for! The program is the Ed.D. in Developmental Education Administration at Sam Houston State University. (My mom is worried that I would earn my doctorate and not be able to find a job.)

I have 2 years of work experience as a college access counselor for at-risk high school students, 3 years in higher education with admissions, enrollment management, and academic programs.

I am honestly somewhat lost as to what to do next. My options are open. I could go to school while working within the profession part-time, or work full-time and go to school. I want to do more academic advising and go to school.

Any pointers on what I should do?
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losemygrip
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« Reply #1 on: April 07, 2012, 2:22:44 PM »

Quote
I want to do more academic advising and go to school.

Why do you need pointers on what to do?  This is what you want to do, right?  : )

Hard to know what to tell you since you haven't said what degree you have or specifically whether advising is actually your career goal or just your temporary job while attending school.  You probably need a more specific career goal than what you've outlined here.  That Ed.D. sounds pretty specialized to me.  Before I enrolled in a graduate program, I would make sure I knew exactly what I was going to do, and then find a grad program that matched that, then go to the best school that I could get into.  I'm not sure how far an Ed.D. from SHSU would take you.  (Not as far as a Ph.D. from U of H.)

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zharkov
or, the modern Prometheus.
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« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2012, 7:37:45 AM »


I can't imagine how an MBA would help you, and besides, online MBAs are for 30 and 40-somethings who are already well established in industry, but have a hard time getting to class.  So it is sort of credentialing deal. 

If you are just in your 20s and think you need an MBA, only consider AACSB accredited programs, and plan to take all or most of your classes face-to-face.  I'd even tell you to target top programs and go full time, but I am not at all clear why you even considered an MBA.
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__________
Zharkov's Razor:
Adapting Zharkov a bit to this situation, ignorance and confusion can explain a lot.
mswhitneycee
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« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2012, 9:29:37 AM »

My Bachelors degree is in Communication-Radio & Television and my M.Ed is in Instructional Leadership with a minor in Counselor Education and I earned an Academic Advising Certificate.

The MBA I program I was accepted into is AACSB-accredited, but they offer the classes both online and on-campus. I was considering the program to diversify myself...something to fall back on.

I am very interested in academic advising and student services so I can help students transition into their first year of college, then move forward throughout their collegiate career towards graduation.
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alleyoxenfree
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Countin' all these posts as publications


« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2012, 11:13:55 AM »

I suggest you spend some time reading job listings here and looking at the qualifications they ask for.  If I were on a hiring committee for academic advising, I would want someone with a full counseling degree, but that's because I find these newer "educational leadership" degrees to be largely less rigorous and subject-oriented.  Your particular degree may have been terrific, but I think your desire to keep all your options open and get degrees to fall back on, is hurting you - your resume seems like you don't know what you want, compared to others.  And you do seem to know what you want.  Look at jobs that aren't specifically academic advising, like programs for EOPS students, first-year programs, anything that talks about the high school-college transition.  Look at getting a subject-area Ph.D. in counseling, with a dissertation on these kinds of transitions. 

About the MBA, I agree with others.  That's something to do if you want to work in business with a company that produces testing services, for instance.  I doubt that kind of work would give you the one-on-one mentoring work you seem to like to do.

Whether you work part-time or full-time, try to add to your portfolio skills with individual students.  Most academic advisors knowing that recruiting and admissions is different work than what they do.  Also, quite blaming your supervisors specifically for your layoff - even if it was true, it makes you look bad because you're dissing them.  Just take advantage of the fact that it's a crummy economy and say that you were laid off for budget reasons but in the time you were there, you learned some valuable things, which were.....
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prytania3
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Prytania, the Foracle


« Reply #5 on: April 08, 2012, 3:57:13 PM »

I would watch going into developmental education--see the State of Connecticut for things to come.

In short, cutting developmental ed may be the new thing. There is an article about it in Inside Higher Ed: http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2012/04/04/connecticut-legislature-mulls-elimination-remedial-courses
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I'm not a narcissist. I'm just angry and violent.
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