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Author Topic: Best place to teach online adjunct?  (Read 76129 times)
merce
strange attractor
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« Reply #15 on: December 31, 2011, 2:20:25 AM »

Are any of you online adjuncts doing literature? Any MLA type courses at all?
I've missed teaching literature so much I've thought of looking for online adjunct classes to supplement the course -load I already have or for the future if I don't get a TT job (which looks to be the case).
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infopri
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« Reply #16 on: December 31, 2011, 2:26:30 AM »

Are any of you online adjuncts doing literature? Any MLA type courses at all?
I've missed teaching literature so much I've thought of looking for online adjunct classes to supplement the course -load I already have or for the future if I don't get a TT job (which looks to be the case).

Nope, sorry, I'm in a non-MLA field.  But be aware that teaching online is a lot more time consuming than a face-to-face class.  You have to type out everything, so even a five- or ten-minute oral conversation with a student translates to up to an hour of typing back and forth--and that's assuming you're both online at the same time.  If your communications are asynchronous (email), that hour could be spread out over a week or more--and it could add up to several hours, if any message(s) in the exchange is/are unclear and lead to further questions or a misunderstanding that then has to be corrected/clarified.  And you have to type out (or record) all your lectures.  And the whole pace of discussions changes when they occur online, via written posts.

I'm not saying don't do it--but be aware of what you'd be getting into.

Good luck!
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amlithist
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« Reply #17 on: January 01, 2012, 12:25:27 PM »

I'm FT and tenured, but I teach my Early Am Lit exclusively online (usually summers, 8-week) and it's beautiful.  I get good students, and I can pile on so much more reading than in a F2F class.  I also get much better analyses and responses in the online class.
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bone_gal
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« Reply #18 on: January 03, 2012, 3:31:16 PM »

Sorry to derail this thread a bit, but for amlithist- how much reading do you give in your 8 week course versus a full semester (if they differ in length)? How many pages per week? Thanks!

I'm FT and tenured, but I teach my Early Am Lit exclusively online (usually summers, 8-week) and it's beautiful.  I get good students, and I can pile on so much more reading than in a F2F class.  I also get much better analyses and responses in the online class.
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roaringmice
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« Reply #19 on: January 24, 2012, 9:16:07 PM »

Where I teach there are accelerated, 5-week courses. We cover the same amount of material and reading as this same course would if taught in a normal 15-ish week semester, if not more.
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linamesa
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« Reply #20 on: May 08, 2012, 8:25:10 PM »

South University is the pits. Avoid avoid avoid. I am looking for another gig right now, and as soon as one comes online for me, I am dumping South University. The attitude taken toward faculty, as if we are truants to be kept in line, is unbelievable. The management needs to earn a degree in management--and not from this cr*p school.
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resistk
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« Reply #21 on: July 04, 2012, 11:39:47 AM »

Kaplan - Low pay, ridiculous demands on your time, uncompensated work, no respect for your degree, you are a commodity.  Avoid at all costs, you will lose money on the deal.

APUS - Low pay, worthless training, expects you to do it yourself. Some people like APUS, if the pay were more than pennies, it might be worth it.

Try for an accredited school that is NOT primarily online.
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jlachn2
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« Reply #22 on: July 30, 2012, 5:57:44 PM »

I'm a med student with a masters degree in secondary education. i was wondering if it would be doable to teach on line while I'm in my clinical rotations to help with tuition? ill be doing 8-12 hour shifts in the hospital.
About how much time does one 3 credit hour course require?
About how many courses can i reasonably teach part time?
Id greatly appreciate any advice you can offer
Thanks
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infopri
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« Reply #23 on: July 31, 2012, 10:41:59 AM »

I'm a med student with a masters degree in secondary education. i was wondering if it would be doable to teach on line while I'm in my clinical rotations to help with tuition? ill be doing 8-12 hour shifts in the hospital.
About how much time does one 3 credit hour course require?
About how many courses can i reasonably teach part time?
Id greatly appreciate any advice you can offer
Thanks

No, you should not take on the responsibility of teaching online while in your clinical rotation.  You will fail at both.  First of all, a new prep (that is, the first time you teach a course) takes a huge amount of intellectual effort, even if you already know the material itself cold.  You need to decide on the textbook(s) and/or other readings (and order them), organize the material into class-session-sized chunks, figure out how to present the material in a way that will make sense to newbies (your students), prepare the lectures and other learning activities (yes, even online), create and grade homework assignments, create and grade quizzes and exams, and also address the never-ending student questions, problems, complaints, and enthusiasms (that wonderful student who wants to talk further with you about the material).

On top of all that, teaching online is incredibly time consuming--much more so than teaching in the classroom.  Every single communication with your students--your lectures, your instructions, class discussions, your short conversations (and long ones), everything--must be typed out, which is much, much slower than simply speaking.  Much of what you say has the potential to be misunderstood, which means you need to spend even more time on these communications, either crafting them more carefully (to avoid misunderstandings) or clarifying anything that has been misunderstood.  You need to make a greater effort to gauge whether your students are falling behind or "not getting" the material, since you can't see facial expressions or read body language.  In short, you will work very, very hard.

I imagine (hope) that you will already be expending a great deal of physical, intellectual, and psychic energy on your rotations.  All I can say about that is that, as a a patient, I want a doctor who paid complete attention during his or her training, not someone who was distracted (and exhausted) by an outside activity as intensive as teaching (especially online).
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yemaya
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« Reply #24 on: July 31, 2012, 11:29:08 AM »

I'm a med student with a masters degree in secondary education. i was wondering if it would be doable to teach on line while I'm in my clinical rotations to help with tuition? ill be doing 8-12 hour shifts in the hospital.
About how much time does one 3 credit hour course require?
About how many courses can i reasonably teach part time?
Id greatly appreciate any advice you can offer
Thanks

No, you should not take on the responsibility of teaching online while in your clinical rotation.  You will fail at both.  First of all, a new prep (that is, the first time you teach a course) takes a huge amount of intellectual effort, even if you already know the material itself cold.  You need to decide on the textbook(s) and/or other readings (and order them), organize the material into class-session-sized chunks, figure out how to present the material in a way that will make sense to newbies (your students), prepare the lectures and other learning activities (yes, even online), create and grade homework assignments, create and grade quizzes and exams, and also address the never-ending student questions, problems, complaints, and enthusiasms (that wonderful student who wants to talk further with you about the material).

On top of all that, teaching online is incredibly time consuming--much more so than teaching in the classroom.  Every single communication with your students--your lectures, your instructions, class discussions, your short conversations (and long ones), everything--must be typed out, which is much, much slower than simply speaking.  Much of what you say has the potential to be misunderstood, which means you need to spend even more time on these communications, either crafting them more carefully (to avoid misunderstandings) or clarifying anything that has been misunderstood.  You need to make a greater effort to gauge whether your students are falling behind or "not getting" the material, since you can't see facial expressions or read body language.  In short, you will work very, very hard.

I imagine (hope) that you will already be expending a great deal of physical, intellectual, and psychic energy on your rotations.  All I can say about that is that, as a a patient, I want a doctor who paid complete attention during his or her training, not someone who was distracted (and exhausted) by an outside activity as intensive as teaching (especially online).

+1.

To answer specifically, you are looking at at least 10, and probably closer to 15 hours a week per course. Those numbers do not take into consideration either the prep, or that someone who is new to (especially online) teaching may not be as efficient with grading, etc.  Moreover, you are likely to earn around $2000 per course, and there are no guarantees from one term to the next. That's not going to make much of a dent in tuition at most med schools.

If you were a PhD student, whose schedule (while very demanding) was a bit more flexible, and who had a bit of college-level teaching experience, I *might* be more encouraging.  For all the reasons Infopri outlines, I think that online teaching is something that should only be tackled by someone with a few years of on-the-ground college-level teaching under their belt.  It could be disastrous for a newbie prof.

I think that you're much better off focusing on your rotations. There's a lot risk and stress, for little reward for someone in your position.
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paul_robeson
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« Reply #25 on: July 09, 2013, 11:36:54 AM »

Bumping up this old thread to see if there is additional feedback about specific places to teach online.
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radioradio
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« Reply #26 on: October 21, 2013, 12:14:48 AM »

Art Institute of Pittsburgh Online does offer non-art related courses as part of the curriculum, but I am not clear what those are. (I teach art and design.) Wow, I was surprised to see that working for them is much nicer than many other places folks have talked about in this thread. It's a way better deal money-wise than teaching on-ground at about $1700 per 5.5 week course.

These days I usually have no more than 15 students, and many times fewer than 10. Of course they do keep track of you pretty closely to make sure that you adhere to timing requirements for feedback and grading, but I've been doing it for almost 4 years now and have my system down, more or less. I spend anywhere from 8 to 15 hours per week in the classroom, depending on the course content and the group of students I've got.

We have required faculty "meetings" online about once a month, and my supervising faculty have always been very supportive, kind, respectful, and helpful. They seem to really want the students to have good experiences, too... I know we all work very hard to achieve that, so it is a shame the bad rep that schools like this often have.

I go into the classroom with everything already prepared each session. My job mainly entails commenting on every students' assignments, grading, providing extra references and resources, encouragement, etc. It really is a pretty good gig, which is why I've kept it even though I'm back to working a full-time non-academic job for now. The extra money pays for my mortgage each month. :)

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q8prof
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« Reply #27 on: January 03, 2014, 10:05:03 AM »

I just had an interview with SNHU for an online teaching job.  They told me that their courses are already completed designed.  This seems to go against an earlier posting in this thread from a few years ago.  Does anyone have any more recent insights into this school? 
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tinyzombie
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« Reply #28 on: January 03, 2014, 10:15:18 AM »

Several relatively recent threads come up if you search for SNHU here. You might also be interested in today's article about it on Slate.
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yemaya
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« Reply #29 on: January 05, 2014, 6:36:12 PM »

Several relatively recent threads come up if you search for SNHU here. You might also be interested in today's article about it on Slate.

This.  The school takes great pride in viewing its students as customers.  In addition to the Slate article, TinyZombie mentioned, there is this article from a bit over a year ago by Fast Company, where SNHU officials more or less boast about remodeling their policies in the image of companies like Amazon and Zappos.  You might recall the attention Amazon has received over the shabby and unethical ways it treats its employees and keep this in mind as you consider whether you'd take a job offer from them.

Only SNHU administrators (many of whom come from for profit backgrounds) and alums still think its a real school.  The day students I've known are slightly better than the online students, but that's really not saying much.  The entitlement on its online students tends to be in inverse proportion to their (almost non-existent) work ethic and academic abilities.  And before anyone accuses me of prejudice against non-traditional learners, I'm familiar with non-traditional students and online education.  The SNHU students I've encountered are significantly out-paced by the majority of their brethren. 
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