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Author Topic: when is enough, enough  (Read 70423 times)
anon2
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Posts: 87


« on: June 20, 2006, 10:57:40 PM »


After billions--with a "B"--of taxpayers' money spent to rebuild new orleans, now the mayor has requested, and the governor caved in, to put the National Guard in their to stem the violence. (I guess new orleans doesn't have a police force. If so, are they drawing a paycheck?)

I say enough is enough. New Orleans has become a rathole for taxpayers' money with no end in sight. Let me say that again: WITH NO END IN SIGHT

When are people going to wake up? Or, should we just keep shelling out the money ad infinitum?
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guyfromnola
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« Reply #1 on: June 21, 2006, 10:08:30 AM »

I don't know if you're just a troll, but I'll try to answer a few questions.

Billions have not been spent. Billions have been appropriated. Those are two very different things.

Yes, the National Guard is back, and they are patrolling empty areas of the city. Areas that were flooded due to the negligence of the Corps of Engineers. Because they are largely vacant, these areas continue to be besieged by looters. The empty houses have also become a draw to other criminal elements. The National Guard should have never left in the first place.

Yes, we have a police force. I'll be the last one to say it's a good police force. It certainly needs work. On the other hand, most of the officers are still living in trailers, because their homes were destroyed when the levees broke.

Right after the flood, a friend from Florida warned me about how long recovery would take. He lived through a major hurricane, and he said that it took almost 5 years for the area to fully recover.
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alice
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« Reply #2 on: June 21, 2006, 5:02:42 PM »

Agreed.
People living in an area are eyes and ears and deter crime. With empty, gutted, houses for more miles that you can imagine, unless you live here, the police simply cannot patrol effectively. My former neighborhood has a 'private patrol' and still friends had a generator stolen in broad daylight while they went to Home Depot. the generator was bolted down. Why was it stolen? Nobody around to notice.

New Orleans is a vibrant city with soul and character and worth rebuilding. Isn't the area around the World Trade centers being rebuilt?  Aren't areas subject to other natural disasters such as fires and blizzards maintained? Shouldn't a valuable port city be fixed? After all it was the United States Army Corp of Engineers who flooded the city, not a hurricane.
Alice
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gastr1
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Posts: 441


« Reply #3 on: June 23, 2006, 9:30:18 PM »

warning: cross-posted...

We all really should ignore anon2 and hope s/he goes away. I have yet to see an honest or informative post from them-- only attempts to inflame.

Against my better judgment, I'll bite: tell us, anon2, what do you hope to gain from this approach? Surely you are itching to make a larger point about our screwed-up academic money-pit programs, bloated egos, and bacchanalian lifestyles... Why don't you post a thread on whatever it is that's hacking away at you?

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"Gastr1 should not touch Cezanne, it's a travesty that gastr1 does it. Gastr1 must stay within Rothko and Svartz."
anonforthis
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Posts: 83


« Reply #4 on: July 08, 2006, 12:15:54 PM »

warning: cross-posted...

We all really should ignore anon2 and hope s/he goes away. I have yet to see an honest or informative post from them-- only attempts to inflame.

Against my better judgment, I'll bite: tell us, anon2, what do you hope to gain from this approach? Surely you are itching to make a larger point about our screwed-up academic money-pit programs, bloated egos, and bacchanalian lifestyles... Why don't you post a thread on whatever it is that's hacking away at you?



I believe the issue anon2 is trying to bring up is all we hear is more money is needed. It looks like we're just throwing money at the problem and will be doing so for decades.

Just yesterday I heard some professor from tulane who was on CSPAN bemoaning the fact the NO doesn't have catergory-5 certified levees yet. We keep hearing about the federal government effectively buying the destroyed houses from the homeowners. My insurance rates are going up to make up for the payments the insurance company made to NO residents.

I think anon2 is asking this (and if not, I surely am), when is somebody going to say "okay, we don't need any more of your (tax) money. We can take it from here."

I would also like to know why the overwhelming burden of payment---read tax dollars---isn't ponied up by the people who live in the region. Seems to me the property taxes of Louisiana state residents should be doubled for the forseeable future to pay for this. After all, it is their state. (I live in Wyoming.)
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carol
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« Reply #5 on: July 08, 2006, 3:11:37 PM »


I would also like to know why the overwhelming burden of payment---read tax dollars---isn't ponied up by the people who live in the region. Seems to me the property taxes of Louisiana state residents should be doubled for the forseeable future to pay for this. After all, it is their state. (I live in Wyoming.)


What a brilliant idea! I really like this.

Why not have the people who live in a state pick up the bulk of the reconstruction cost. I live in the Texas panhandle. We are subject to tornados all the time. Why should people living in Arizona or Alaska pay for tornado damage. Why should people in Illinois be paying for earthquake damage in California.

I'll make everyone a deal. I'll vote to have my property taxes raised in Texas to pay for tornado damage if people in Louisiana and Florida pick up the tab for their hurricane damage. After all, I chose to live here. People living elsewhere shouldn't pay for that. In turn, I should (continue) paying for new orleans when I live in Texas. You chose to live there. You should pay for that decision out of your pocket.

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sirkdn
Darkside
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Posts: 395


« Reply #6 on: July 11, 2006, 3:45:50 PM »

Let's go further.... let's equalize a state's "balance of payments" in a similar way- no more out than you put in...  in this way, the place where I live (NYC) won't have to WASTE its resources by sending them off to Wyoming and Alabama.  Alternately, let's allow the "donor states" to have more votes than the "recipient states" - that way OUR money might be spent the way we like...

In all seriousness, as part of a civil society we all contribute to the common good - and in my mind "the common good" includes supporting my neighbors in New Orleans.
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bassfishn
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Posts: 5


« Reply #7 on: July 14, 2006, 12:26:23 PM »

When it rains really hard in State "A" and that makes the rivers in State "B" overflow -- who would pay for that??
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profess_or
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Posts: 3


« Reply #8 on: July 14, 2006, 7:06:50 PM »

When it rains extensively in State A and floods State B, it is clear that State A should pay. Given the previous glowing logic earlier in this thread, the bastards in State A should have known not to live in a place with a river. We will fill in all rivers and live in economic prosperity and peace! Ummm...
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winnie
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Posts: 205


« Reply #9 on: July 14, 2006, 8:54:03 PM »

I despise the selfishness and, yes, un-Americanness of some of these posters.

We are the UNITED States. That means that we are UNITED, not just saying to neighbor states, "Tough luck, you had a plague of locusts, well, shame on you."

If you really want to save money, work to get the U. S. out of Iraq. Or if you still support the war, enlist.
« Last Edit: July 15, 2006, 12:02:37 AM by moderator » Logged
basilratbane
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Posts: 217


« Reply #10 on: July 15, 2006, 3:10:11 PM »

The flood in New Orleans happened because a federal agency, the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, didn't keep the levees repaired.

It was a federal mistake, so the federal government should be paying for it.

That seems simple, clear, and fair to me.
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dale1
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My mother-in-law would point out God's gray hairs.


« Reply #11 on: July 26, 2006, 8:05:25 PM »

Federal government gets tax dollars from all Americans.  The above poster's point does nothing to further the argument.

I do believe we need to support a reasonable rebuilding of the areas impacted.  Clearly we cannot let NO die, because of its importance as a port city.  But I do not believe it's cost-effective to rebuild the city to how it was before.
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Dale (original)
gennimom
Somewhat Southern (Have I really posted that much?)
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Let's get summer over with! Me want snow!


« Reply #12 on: August 17, 2006, 11:51:48 PM »

NO is not only trying to recover from flood damage, it's sinking. Before man came along, it used to get rebuilt by floods depositing more silt. But, in our infinite wisdom, we decided the channels and river should flow where we want it to go and not where Mother Nature dictated. We may not be able to fix the problem and still live there. Also, have none of you noticed how many people in NO lived below the poverty level? Wonder where they would get the money to pay double property taxes?

Another problem is the insurance companies. They are being nitpicky (both in LA and MS) and saying the damage is flood related and not wind damage (people didn't think it could flood and so didn't buy flood insurance see). So they don't want to pay up. Also, at least in MS, the politicians want to raise insurance rates for the entire state to cover the coast. This would be all well and good but the residents have to buy insurance from for-profit insurance companies that, really, only want to make money for their shareholders. So they are going to try to keep from paying anything they can. Of course, the insurance companies are trying to short Sen. Trent Lott. We'll see how well that goes since he is now suing them because the storm destroyed his parent's home.
A neighbor of a relative lost their carport and had bad roof damage. The insurance paid a pittance. That story is repeating itself over and over.

If the residents of MS and LA are going to have to cough up higher insurance rates, it should be to a non-profit insurance company, whose main concern is to get them back on their feet. But wait! The for-profit companies won't like that! What to do, What to do? I guess if you are rich and want to go to a big name insurance company, you should have that right, but I feel that the people who are supposed to pay to fix the damage should have that as their main concern and not their own pockets.

And for those of you who think us southerners don't put enough money into the kitty to help fix problems, check out who are the most generous states in charitable giving, per capita income. Also realize, there are fewer than 4 million people in MS. We also didn't make the coast such an attractive place to build. Mother Nature did that. 36 years of not having any major hurricane damage didn't hurt. Just like people in CA, MO, AR, and TN forget what kind of damage an earthquake can cause and then build in the worst places (I dread to think what will happen to Memphis, if the New Madrid does another 1811-12 quake), people on the coast forget that big winds and a lot of water can cause a lot of damage. I guess it has to do with the fact that the most attractive places to live are often also the most dangerous, for one reason or another. I mean, look at HI. Yes they are beautiful islands. They are also, everyone of them, volcanos. Hmmm...
Sorry about the rant, but what has happened over the last year chaps my hide...
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...only after reading gm's post, my new mantra is "always listen to gennimom".
Monday reeks! - Garfield
The outside of a horse is good for the inside of a person (or something like that).
gladboy
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Posts: 11


« Reply #13 on: October 28, 2006, 1:33:59 AM »

it's very long discussion. i am agree.
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voxprincipalis
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« Reply #14 on: October 07, 2010, 7:17:48 AM »

it's very long discussion. i am agree.

when something become more irritating than the things are become like enough is enough.

I sense a spammer love connection here. You kids are so cute!

Except that flintoff and gladboy are separated by four years. It's like The Lake House! Will they find true love, and each other?

VP
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