Student busted using a phone during final

(1/6) > >>

rtk_johnson:
This is aggravating.

I had one of my math students take an independent final exam outside my office, from about 11AM to 4PM. I kept my TA's around but out of sight so the student could focus. Around 1PM, my assistant overheard the student making a phone call to a friend asking to bring food over. No food was brought. Later he requested through my assistants if he could take a break and get something to eat. I of course said no. The students see me as very strict and I do not see final exams as a time for leniency.

I have spent a lot of extra time working with this student. The semester started off rocky, but after the first midterm, he has now shown extremely strong determination to become fluent in the material. I have been informed by U's Learning serv that this student requires extra time, and from what I have seen it is most likely attention deficit, hyperactive. Student has shown no reluctance to put 18 hours on a weekly assignment that should take 7. This is why I help him.

Emailed the student stating that I was aware of his phone use during the test. Added that I may take some consequences. Warned student that it would not be a good idea to give me some BS excuse like he didn't know phones weren't allowed. Student took no excuses and explained in a very direct manner (missed breakfast, no lunch), and apologized for "stupid behavior". Student said he "probably deserves" any action I take. No conversation about the class material seems to have taken place.

I am not teaching this class next semester, so student will be on his own (without the added help) if I flunk him for this. Student seems to have done below what I expected from him on the final, distracted by hunger. I am at a loss of what to do. Suggestions?

prytania3:
Are you a troll? If I had a five hour final, I'd damn sure call for take-out, too.

rtk_johnson:
Final was 3 hours but student was accommodated with extra time. Nothing prevented him from bringing something to the final beforehand. An enforced no-phone policy is pretty commonplace in exams.

How else can I show the student that time management is something I take seriously, and that rules are there for a reason.

larryc:
Quote from: rtk_johnson on March 22, 2013,  2:12:47 AM

my assistant overheard the student making a phone call to a friend asking to bring food over. No food was brought. Later he requested through my assistants if he could take a break and get something to eat.

he has now shown extremely strong determination to become fluent in the material . . . has shown no reluctance to put 18 hours on a weekly assignment that should take 7

Student took no excuses ... apologized for "stupid behavior". Student said he "probably deserves" any action I take. No conversation about the class material seems to have taken place.


I'd let it go. The kid has impulse control problems but does not seem to be a cheater or schemer.

At the end of the day our job is not to enforce some set of rules, but to teach students and then to assess if they have learned. Never let rules get in the way of that.

barred_owl:
Oh, boy...Larryc nails it, as usual.  While I was composing this response, Larryc reported in with his usual, spot-on response.  You can stop reading now, if you like, OP.  Larryc got it right in far fewer sentences than I did.  But If you choose to continue reading, OP, then consider this:

Quote from: rtk_johnson on March 22, 2013,  2:24:38 AM

Final was 3 hours but student was accommodated with extra time. Nothing prevented him from bringing something to the final beforehand. An enforced no-phone policy is pretty commonplace in exams.

How else can I show the student that time management is something I take seriously, and that rules are there for a reason.

I of course said no. The students see me as very strict and I do not see final exams as a time for leniency.

Whoa! 

There are a whole lot of problems with your reactionary response to this situation, OP.

First of all, I take it that you WEREN'T there for the entire FIVE hours that the student was working on this exam?  Does your university have a separate testing facility for students with testing accommodations, e.g., extra time?  If so, why was this student not sent to that facility?

Second, did YOU go out to lunch while your student was working??  If so, how can you reconcile the decision to take a lunch against the student's need for some sort of nutrition and supervision mid-way through a FIVE-hour exam?? If I have students who require accommodation in the form of additional time (usually time-and-a-half), I am ALWAYS at least on campus during that time period, or have made arrangements with our testing center to inform me of problems, accordingly.

Third, did your student know that s/he would have been allowed to bring a lunch ??  It's one thing to state that "nothing prevented" the student from bringing a lunch; it's another thing entirely to assure that the student knew s/he could have brought at least a snack during the exam period.

Finally, given that it's the end of the semester--is it really, truly such a big deal to teach this student (who, by your own account, OP, has made good progress in spite of a diagnosed learning disability) a "lesson" about just how tough you are and how vehemently you stick to the rules??  Really?  Really???

If you're hell-bent on that last point, I feel sorry for your student whose intentions seemed innocent enough. Innocent until PROVEN guilty, and all that, at least here in the U.S.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page