The "Talent Wall": When talent has to become effort

(1/9) > >>

latico:
On the "Bang your head on your desk" thread, an extremely interesting conversation arose a few days ago on the concept of the "talent wall":  the point at which students can no longer get by on talent and must exert effort to succeed. The whole process of moving from undergrad to tenure is moving from *potential* (talent) to *production* (effort). 

I thought I would start this thread to strategize with all of you about ways to help students, undergrads and grads, who have hit the "talent wall," whether it is in remedial algebra or while studying for orals. 

Polly_mer, Blackadder, cc_Alan, prof52, and others all had wonderful insights on this subject, as did several others, and I thought it would be great if we could all share our strategies for helping students in this situation. 

I googled "talent wall" and came up with nothing, so I think it is a phrase coined by the fora, either by Polly_mer or Blackadder.  It would be great if we could develop it further, because I think it would help a lot of teachers to have this phenomenon identified and defined.  Someone on the previous thread said that the "talent wall" comes up a lot in her/his research, so forgive me if I have missed some published sources of information!  I can't remember your name, sadly, but perhaps you will contribute here?

I am nervous about starting a thread--I have only ever started one before, so I hope that no one minds that I picked up this conversation and turned it into a new topic. But I'm so interested in what everyone has to say about this phenomenon that I'm braving my anxieties and clicking "post" now!

scienceguy:
My perspective may be different because I teach at a community college, but I tend to observe the opposite barrier: the effort wall. I would define this barrier as the point at which students can no longer rely on effort alone and must begin to display talent to succeed.

jellyfish:
I was actually thinking about that term the other day, while I was working on a paper for a literature class.  

I'll just come right out and say it: I'm a bit of a procrastinator.  I know it's bad, it's not exactly wonder work ethic, and so on.  The thing is, though, it works for me. Every time I try to be the good student and come up with outlines and all that jazz, I get a lower a score than I do when I just sit down and start writing--and I really think it's because I start over-thinking to the point my thought process lacks focus. By the time I have finished all the outlines and prewrites, I'm burnt out.

I have seen peers spend weeks pre-writing and outlining and bloodying up their books with notes and still get a mid-B at best, while I hammer something out just a few days before and manage an A.
Something tells me that this is going to come back and bite me in the butt some day, which is why I'm trying to find some balance. It's not that I don't care about the quality of my work either. When I get writing, I'm very particular about what I edit out and what I keep in. I proofread my work before I hand it in.

I don't mean to hijack this thread, but anyone who has opinions on my very weird situation and ways that I can improve my work habits will be loved!

voxprincipalis:
Quote from: curiouscanary on April 06, 2013,  7:38:39 PM

I was actually thinking about that term the other day, while I was working on a paper for a literature class.  


Are you an undergraduate? I want to be able to properly contextualize your comments.

VP

jellyfish:
Quote from: voxprincipalis on April 06, 2013,  7:45:04 PM

Quote from: curiouscanary on April 06, 2013,  7:38:39 PM

I was actually thinking about that term the other day, while I was working on a paper for a literature class.  


Are you an undergraduate? I want to be able to properly contextualize your comments.

VP



Yes, I am an undergrad.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page