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Author Topic: credit load towards co-teaching a course  (Read 2583 times)
prof22
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« on: May 03, 2012, 7:41:33 PM »

In your department, when you co-teach a 3 credit undergraduate course with one other person, how much does that count towards your individual teaching load?  Does each person get 3 credits? 1.5?
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glowdart
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« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2012, 7:53:06 PM »

Team-taught classes here count as a regular course for both faculty members, but they have double the usual enrollment cap, and they need to enroll 150% of the usual single course enrollment cap to make. 

(So, if a course is normally 50 students, then the team-taught course is 100 students, and you need 75 for the class to run.)
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anon99
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« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2012, 8:12:59 PM »

As we teach half of the classes, we get half the credit.  So in your example 1.5.
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betty_p
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« Reply #3 on: May 03, 2012, 10:38:57 PM »

At my school, a team-taught course counts exactly as much toward load as a regular course, and the cap is the same as for a regular course. Apparently, I'm lucky.

But that's just minimally as it should be. In my experience, team teaching is a lot more work than teaching alone. Sure, maybe we can split up the grading, but there's a lot more prep and coordination. In a perfect world, a 3-credit team-taught course would count as 4.5 credits toward each prof's teaching load.

And there would be grading fairies. And students would clamor for supplemental readings. And I'd be allowed to send my hologram to meetings.
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But I'm not bitter.
larryc
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« Reply #4 on: May 04, 2012, 1:09:19 AM »

As we teach half of the classes, we get half the credit.  So in your example 1.5.

That was the rule at my old school. Thus if you did a team course, you could only do it as an overload, and would be paid (when I started) $900.

And yet the administration was constantly asking us to develop team courses, apparently because the board thought they were innovative. The brought in people to lecture us on best practices in team-taught classes and twisted our arms to make us come. The deans brought it up in conversation. The president would mention it in his yearly hectoring of the faculty.

$900.
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zharkov
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« Reply #5 on: May 04, 2012, 8:05:54 AM »

As we teach half of the classes, we get half the credit.  So in your example 1.5.

That was the rule at my old school. Thus if you did a team course, you could only do it as an overload, and would be paid (when I started) $900.

And yet the administration was constantly asking us to develop team courses, apparently because the board thought they were innovative. The brought in people to lecture us on best practices in team-taught classes and twisted our arms to make us come. The deans brought it up in conversation. The president would mention it in his yearly hectoring of the faculty.

$900.


I used to work in industry, which had its downsides, but the lack of understanding on the part of higher ed leadership between goals and funding boggles my mind.  What makes it even stranger is that many of these admins had stints as social science faculty, so the place of human motivation and agency should be a natural way for them to think about these things.  But its as though they had some sort of ECT that wiped out that knowledge, to be replaced by a sort of magical thinking.

End of the rant and back to the question.

I had one admin who was supportive of team teaching, encouraged it, and both faculty got load credit.  Another only gave load credit if the course enrollment exceeded a certain threshold, which was not normally the case.  A third case, different school, comes to mind, and faculty could team teach some specially approved courses, of where there were just a handful.  But there was a system in place to allow that, based on the course design, and the value that team teaching would bring to the course.  (Which seems like a good system.)



 
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Zharkov's Razor:
Adapting Zharkov a bit to this situation, ignorance and confusion can explain a lot.
paddington_bear
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« Reply #6 on: May 04, 2012, 10:16:51 PM »

I'm currently team-teaching (or "was," since the semester is over) a course. Fortunately our provost believed that it wasn't half the work - and when I team-taught the course for the first time, I found this to be true - so my colleague and I each get full credit, and the class is maxed at what a single-prof course would be. The situation might have been different had the course not come about because of a grant. It'll be interesting to see if, due to various new circumstances, the course will either count for half a load, or if we'll have to double, or at least increase, the enrollment.
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seniorscholar
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« Reply #7 on: May 06, 2012, 11:11:31 AM »

Team-taught classes here count as a regular course for both faculty members, but they have double the usual enrollment cap, and they need to enroll 150% of the usual single course enrollment cap to make.  

Same here.

The really nifty ones are the interdisciplinary graduate courses, taught by people from two different disciplines. Since they're graduate courses, "double the usual cap" amounts to 24 students (themselves often from a dozen different disciplines) and I get full value every time simply in what I learn while "teaching" the class.
« Last Edit: May 06, 2012, 11:14:49 AM by seniorscholar » Logged
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