• October 31, 2014
October 31, 2014, 2:49:03 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with your Chronicle username and password
News: For all you tweeters, follow The Chronicle on Twitter.
 
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: How to proceed when your panel folds?  (Read 10220 times)
lowerninthward
Member
***
Posts: 194


« on: May 01, 2012, 12:04:40 PM »

I organized a session for an international conference with myself and three other presenters. One has been bumped from the program for not registering, one has cancelled due to summer teaching and the other has asked me to read their paper, also due to summer teaching. The panel was all responsible folk - on lecturer, two Asst. Profs and one full.
Panic ensues.
My panel has folded! I will be alone presenting two papers!
I blame the dates of the conference, usually in March of one year and October of the following year, what were they thinking putting this on in late May? We are all in geographic flux and that is when the big money summer gigs come up.
Any advice?
Anyone have this happen and it turned out swimmingly?

~lnw
Logged
fiona
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 14,072


« Reply #1 on: May 01, 2012, 1:59:51 PM »

I had it happen with a national conference, and I just quickly rounded up two other participants, one of whom turned out to be far greater than any of the no-shows.

Don't know how this might work for an international conference, but maybe you can find people in the city where the conference is taking place.

The Fiona
Logged

The Fiona or Them FionŠ or Fiona the Sublime

Professor of Thread Killing, Fiork University
lowerninthward
Member
***
Posts: 194


« Reply #2 on: May 01, 2012, 2:27:49 PM »

Thanks for the advice The Fiona! Well, the conference association is being real sticklers! They bumped one presenter because he did not pre-register, he could still have made it but they said under no circumstances would their bylaws permit him to present his paper because he had not made the registration deadline. They rejected 50 % of the proposed panels this year so the fact that ours was accepted is great, except now if I try to bring in local scholars (conference is in US this year) they will be in the same position as Dr. Missed Deadline, not on the program and not "allowed" to participate.
I cannot see any way around this - I already have my ticket and have not yet considered cancelling myself but perhaps I should, or try to wheedle Dr. M.D.'s participation for a third time? (Tried twice, emphatically discouraged) Any more advice out there? ~lnw
Logged
melba_frilkins
Doing laundry.
Member-Moderator
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 17,469


« Reply #3 on: May 01, 2012, 2:35:38 PM »

If you are stuck I would take it as an opportunity for you to spend a little more time presenting your own work (because you are always leaving out good bits). And also see if there aren't some registered participants who could read the other papers, so that you're not doing it all solo.
Logged

Light up the corners of your neighborhood with disco balls matched with dancing green and violet beams.
larryc
Troll Proof
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 22,998

Be excellent to each other.


WWW
« Reply #4 on: May 01, 2012, 3:22:53 PM »

What Melba said--just go ahead, present your paper, read the other or maybe just hand it out, and enjoy yourself. It is not your fault and there is nothing to be done about it.

Where there is no choice, there is no problem.
Logged

Trolling for sex is not what this forum is all about.
astoryteller
Junior member
**
Posts: 91


« Reply #5 on: May 02, 2012, 12:58:04 AM »

I agree with the past couple posters: present your paper, taking a little extra time if that's helpful, and hopefully get some good feedback. It seems to me that you'd look really good as the only one there...kind of like high school when you're the only one in class on senior skip day. As for the other paper entrusted to you, is there a session chair who could read it? I, when a chair, have read a paper for a presenter who couldn't make it; that seems more logical to me than another presenter's doing it (even if that presenter organized the session).
Logged
peppergal
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 1,455


« Reply #6 on: May 02, 2012, 5:10:48 AM »

I've been (sort of) in your shoes, when at the last minute one panelist asked to move the session because he couldn't present a paper on the Sabbath.  Moving the session was not going to happen (I wish he had been upfront about his religious needs, because I could have requested from the beginning that the session not be scheduled on Sunday, but spilled milk and all that), so we were down one paper.  Then the Icelandic volcano happened, and it was questionable whether the other panelist would be able to make it, since all flights were grounded and he was on the other side of the volcano from the conference location.  Plan A was that I would read my paper, and Stranded Participant would try to skype in.  Plan B was that I would be a panel of one.  Plan C (which is what ended up working) is that the volcano would calm down and we would be a panel of two.

Can you ask the conference organizers about the possibility of the summer teachers (and Dr. Missed Deadline too, possibly) skyping in?
Logged
lowerninthward
Member
***
Posts: 194


« Reply #7 on: May 03, 2012, 4:59:20 PM »

Good ideas everyone! Its amazing the creativity that a little distance can provide. I am both session chair and presenter. Per Melba and the Fiona's advice I am thinking of asking a colleague who is presenting at a different session to read my absent colleague's paper for her. Both ladies are in Anthropology and work similar topics. This puts another body and set of vocal cords at the podium, and this way as audience members (if we have any at big huge conference) come and go I won't feel too much like people are throwing tomatoes at me alone. I'll let you know how it goes! ~lnw
Logged
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.9 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
  • 1255 Twenty-Third St., N.W.
  • Washington, D.C. 20037
subscribe today

Get the insight you need for success in academe.