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News: Talk online about your experiences as an adjunct, visiting assistant professor, postdoc, or other contract faculty member.
 
Poll
Question: What percentage of your article submissions are accepted at PR journals?
100-90% - 3 (21.4%)
90-80% - 2 (14.3%)
80-70% - 5 (35.7%)
70-60% - 0 (0%)
50% - 4 (28.6%)
Total Voters: 14

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Author Topic: Percentage of Manuscripts Accepted Peer-Review  (Read 15682 times)
totoro
Friendly Neighborhood Troll and
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Posts: 4,962


« Reply #15 on: May 01, 2012, 3:41:01 AM »

I haven't ever seen the term "accept with major revisions" as a option on any journal I've submittted to or reviewed for (which range from natural science journals like Nature or PLoS ONE to hard core economics journals). Interesting.
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zyzzx
Distinguished Senior Member
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Posts: 1,137


« Reply #16 on: May 01, 2012, 4:35:57 AM »

I haven't ever seen the term "accept with major revisions" as a option on any journal I've submittted to or reviewed for (which range from natural science journals like Nature or PLoS ONE to hard core economics journals). Interesting.

The one I'm reviewing now (for one of our Society's journals) has the options:
Accept
Minor revision
Major revision
Reject
Moderate revision

Except for the moderate revision, which I've never seen before (and does look like it's been tacked on there), this is standard for the journals I've reviewed for.

Ok, I guess it's "major revision," not "accept with major revision," but the major revision letters I've seen have all been quite positive and certainly give the impression that if you do what's requested (and do a good job of it), you'll be in. The difference between major revision and revise and resubmit might be just semantics, I don't know. The journal that I saw give out a reject and resubmit does make the reviewers pick between the options above (but without the moderate revision option). I guess reject and resubmit is different from revise and resubmit? Does revise and resubmit give you a deadline for the revisions and treat it all as one submission?
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king_ghidorah
Disgruntled and looking for a little gruntle
Distinguished Senior Member
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Posts: 1,259

Give me three steps, give me three steps, mister.


« Reply #17 on: May 01, 2012, 1:16:20 PM »

King, it sounds like you're determined not to believe what everyone is telling you.  Nobody is compassionately trying to comfort you.  Nobody is helping you preserve an optimistic outlook in the face of disappointing results. Nobody is relating how they bravely manage to "bounce back" after getting a Revise and resubmit.    That is not what we are saying.  And forumites are rarely that compassionate anyway.

What we're saying is: a revise and resubmit IS SUCCESS

I found the top part hilarious, although I suspect it was not meant to be hilarious any more than the mighty forum was attempting to comfort and console but was comforting and consoling and actually uplifting anyway.  No, I've been on these boards for enough posts to understand the strange machismo regarding any signs of weakness, kind a Call of the Wild thing among academics. 

Re-reading your original post, its not clear what the response from the journal actually was.  *******

Sadly, it was the gladiatorial thumbs-down (or was it "thumbs-down" for planting your sword in the dirt and "thumbs-up" for stabbing the poor bastard to death?) from Caesar's box.  My little article writhes upon the blood-stained dirt of theoretical foundations.

Word!  KG
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Last night I lay in bed looking up at the stars in the sky and I thought to myself, where the heck is the ceiling??
king_ghidorah
Disgruntled and looking for a little gruntle
Distinguished Senior Member
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Posts: 1,259

Give me three steps, give me three steps, mister.


« Reply #18 on: May 01, 2012, 1:41:26 PM »

And addendum:

I shall move my recent R&R (I had two articles out this semester) over to the "W" column, which puts me closer to 60%. 
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Last night I lay in bed looking up at the stars in the sky and I thought to myself, where the heck is the ceiling??
flotsam
Member
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Posts: 209


« Reply #19 on: May 07, 2012, 1:24:48 AM »

In MLA fields, acceptance rates at journals can vary widely.  Many of the "top" ones accept far fewer than 20% of essays submitted, so if you're batting .500 at the outset, then you're doing surprisingly great!  Have you checked the MLA Directory of Periodicals, in which most journals list their acceptance rates?  (It's voluntary, I think, so the numbers may occasionally be fudged, but at least it gives you an idea of relative selectivity.) 

Revise-and-resubmit is indeed an invitation to do so -- once, with an essay of mine, I took that response as a negative, but then four months later the editor emailed me to ask if I'd done the revisions, for he was interested in publishing it.  Also, while a straight-out acceptance with no revisions feels great at first (hooray!), the other forumites are right: you'd prefer the critical feedback of your peers and the chance to improve your essay pre-publication.

Also, a rejection is not the end of things, of course.  More common, I think, is that many scholars "aim high," i.e. for an extremely selective and well regarded journal, then if rejected outright, submit (perhaps after revising again, and definitely if the rejection came with feedback) to a somewhat less selective journal.  Unless the essay is really unworthy, it will probably find its way into print somewhere.  (And if it is really unworthy, you don't want it in print with your name on it.)

In conclusion, your whole percentage-poll is really wrong-headed, I'm afraid.  I could say that 100% of my submissions have been accepted (eventually), while a number were either rejected (but later accepted elsewhere), or R-and-R'ed (so, eventually accepted at the original destination). 

By the way, even rejection is not so bad, as it gives you feedback to help you improve the piece, thereby increasing the chances both it and others like it get published in the future.  Congratulations on the already accepted stuff, and best wishes on the future work!
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missbrowntoyou
who has limerick'd, non sequitur'd, and free associated her way to being a
Senior member
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Posts: 501


« Reply #20 on: June 11, 2012, 10:23:18 PM »

About half of my peer-reviewed articles were rejected at some point. They all required revision of some kind.
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"Always forgive your enemies--nothing annoys them so much."
southerntransplant
A man on a porcupine fence and a
Distinguished Senior Member
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Posts: 11,106

No recess.


« Reply #21 on: June 11, 2012, 10:33:55 PM »

I think about 20% of my articles have been rejected the first time. The percentage of manuscripts that have not eventually made their way to publication in some peer-reviewed journal is, however, zero.
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"...And on the other side of this wall is a whole 'nother studio that you'll never get to see...because, you know, fvck you guys."

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missbrowntoyou
who has limerick'd, non sequitur'd, and free associated her way to being a
Senior member
****
Posts: 501


« Reply #22 on: June 11, 2012, 11:05:08 PM »

Rejections can be really useful. I sent out the chapters of my PhD thesis (with some revision, of course) as I finished them and the reviewers gave me the feedback that my advisor didn't.
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"Always forgive your enemies--nothing annoys them so much."
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