• October 31, 2014
October 31, 2014, 7:36:56 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with your Chronicle username and password
News: Talk about how to cope with chronic illness, disability, and other health issues in the academic workplace.
 
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: Publication costs -- any chance of funding when between institutions?  (Read 3338 times)
onewaystreet
Junior member
**
Posts: 61


« on: April 29, 2012, 2:04:47 PM »

My situation is that I've recently graduated from grad school and won't start my new TT job until the fall, but I've got an article coming out soon with illustrations that will cost me about $150 for scanning and rights, and a book coming out at the end of the year which will cost me about $900 for indexing.  (Assuming I follow the press's advice and go with a professional indexer, which does sound appealing since the time for indexing will hit right at the crazy busy start of the new job.)  My question is, is there any point in asking either my grad school or my new institution for help with these publication costs?  Or am I too late for the one, too early for the other?  Thanks!
Logged
bwwm1
Senior member
****
Posts: 409


« Reply #1 on: April 29, 2012, 2:53:47 PM »

Don't bother with a professional indexer. My experience with one was terrible. I basically had to redo the entire index. I'll never go that route again.

As for asking for funds, that depends on local policies. I don't see why couldn't ask you new place to cover some of the costs. The worst that'll happen is they'll say you're not eligible.
Logged
snowbound
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 1,124


« Reply #2 on: April 29, 2012, 3:53:50 PM »

The timing will be right for your new institution to subsidize the indexing, since it will be after you've started.  But they may well have no funds available for such things, so don't rely on it.

Besides, do you really want to put your index in the hands of someone who knows little about your subject???  Someone who, for example, doesn't know the three or four different ways of referring to a particular event or person?  Or who doesn't understand the controversial implications of listing x under category y?  I can't imagine anyone except me (or scholars specializing in the exact same area) could possibly have done the indexing for my book.  It would have been a royal mess.  The indexing was a pain, but I got the hang of it pretty soon and worked my way through.   

If the indexing really is due at an impossible time, you could start now and get the bulk of the work out of the way.  Explain the situation to the press and ask for their guideline sheet on indexing now.
Logged
sugaree
shakin' it since 2007 and only a
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 3,868


« Reply #3 on: April 29, 2012, 6:20:14 PM »

I got the exact opposite advice from my editor - hire a professional indexer. And I did, and I am so happy I did that. Not all such experiences need be bad; my press sent me a list of indexers who had worked on their books and I chose from several who had indexed titles that reflected similar research areas as mine. And the index the professional produced worked well (and again, thank the deities I didn't have to do it!). So, YMMV on this issue.

OP, you should check with your new school about research subvention awards that you might apply for - I doubt your grad institution will give you any money now that you're out the door, but these publications will come out while you are on the TT and TT school may have some funds for you.
Logged

where's the bourbon?
seniorscholar
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 7,506


« Reply #4 on: April 29, 2012, 7:28:04 PM »

Too late for this now, but in all honesty, you should have negotiated these subventions when you were working out the deal for signing the contract. It is certainly among the least expensive things that new faculty ask for, and our dean automatically approves miscellaneous things that total less than about $1000 (humanities department, where people don't really ask for much except the outrageous, like a full pay sabbatical in year 2 plus 6 trips to a library half-way around the world, which will not be granted). In any case, however, you should ask. Here it's a "grant in aid of research" with a maximum of $600 that can be found quickly (and which I've always used for scanning and rights).

I agree about the indexing: unless your topic is very mechanical, a professional indexer has untold opportunities for messing things up - - - and besides, it's while doing the index that I discover I've given the same person a different forename on page 82 than on page 213, and that his (US) Civil War experience took place in 1952, and other wonderful things that a "copy editor" -- who used to be expected to catch things like that but has now been replaced by a software program that only checks spelling and sentence structure but has no knowledge about humanities or history topics.
Logged
octave
Senior member
****
Posts: 271


« Reply #5 on: April 29, 2012, 8:34:35 PM »

The timing will be right for your new institution to subsidize the indexing, since it will be after you've started.  But they may well have no funds available for such things, so don't rely on it.

Besides, do you really want to put your index in the hands of someone who knows little about your subject???  Someone who, for example, doesn't know the three or four different ways of referring to a particular event or person?  Or who doesn't understand the controversial implications of listing x under category y?  I can't imagine anyone except me (or scholars specializing in the exact same area) could possibly have done the indexing for my book.  It would have been a royal mess.  The indexing was a pain, but I got the hang of it pretty soon and worked my way through. 

Ditto to all of this, and also to seniorscholar's points about indexing as proofreading.  For these reasons, at my press, we always recommend people compile their own indexes.

But...

Quote
If the indexing really is due at an impossible time, you could start now and get the bulk of the work out of the way.  Explain the situation to the press and ask for their guideline sheet on indexing now.

That's rarely going to be possible, for the simple reason that there's no way to know what page numbers to enter until the book is typeset.  In our experience, any attempt to "pre-index" results in a huge amount of replicated work.  (It might be manageable if you wanted only an index of proper names, but I still wouldn't recommend it.)

But as to the original question, I don't see any reason why you wouldn't be eligible for whatever funds your new university might have to help with that book.  Your book makes them look good, after all.  (So do make sure your press knows to put your new affiliation in the author bio.)
Logged
brashash
New member
*
Posts: 38


« Reply #6 on: April 30, 2012, 9:03:04 AM »

I'm a longtime lurker and infrequent posters, and I don't know if it's permitted to post the following kind of information.

The Text and Academic Authors Association offers a publication support grant ($1000 max for members) that covers the items you mentioned for articles and/or for books. The fee for new members is $30. (I wanted to suggest this as a possibility. I have a colleague who received a TAA grant in the past.)
Logged
onewaystreet
Junior member
**
Posts: 61


« Reply #7 on: April 30, 2012, 2:40:51 PM »

Thanks for all the advice.  As for the question of whether or not to use an outside indexer -- hmmm.  I'm trying to think through my project and feel like MOST of the indexable content is comprised of names and titles and events that couldn't really be screwed up too badly, but maybe I'm just being naive.  Could people describe in a little more detail what they found frustrating and/or problematic about their experiences with professional indexers?
Logged
bwwm1
Senior member
****
Posts: 409


« Reply #8 on: April 30, 2012, 3:27:59 PM »

Thanks for all the advice.  As for the question of whether or not to use an outside indexer -- hmmm.  I'm trying to think through my project and feel like MOST of the indexable content is comprised of names and titles and events that couldn't really be screwed up too badly, but maybe I'm just being naive.  Could people describe in a little more detail what they found frustrating and/or problematic about their experiences with professional indexers?

My indexer provided one that was too short. The one I produced was about 10 times the length. As others warned above, lacking the background needed to organize the information, her version touched on no themes beyond the most superficial (e.g. personal names, names of companies). There was one central concept which provides the unifying structure to the entire book, and her index included a single entry for this one thing. Finally, it also contained errors in spelling and page numbering.

So if you're hoping for an index that goes much beyond places/personal names, I don't think an indexer can provide it to you. If you're satisfied with that, then go for it. 
Logged
bibliothecula
Academic ronin
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 5,169

like Bunnicula, only with books


« Reply #9 on: May 01, 2012, 5:47:48 PM »

Does your disciplinary association have subvention grants? I know that many do, to help with costs like the scanning, etc.

I am a firm believer in indexing your own book, but you'll hear may opinions here. Run a search on indexing to get the full gamut.
Logged

I came. I saw. I cited.
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.9 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
  • 1255 Twenty-Third St., N.W.
  • Washington, D.C. 20037
subscribe today

Get the insight you need for success in academe.