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Author Topic: no fiction Pulitzer in 2012  (Read 22251 times)
yellowtractor
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« Reply #15 on: April 18, 2012, 6:47:44 PM »

Ann Patchett chimes in:  http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/18/opinion/and-the-winner-of-the-pulitzer-isnt.html
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It is, of course, possible that what I remember as terror was only a love too great to bear.
systeme_d_
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« Reply #16 on: April 18, 2012, 8:13:52 PM »


I got all excited and I was going to send that link to a friend who works with Pearlman, but then I went to her Facebook page and it's already there!
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dr_alcott
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« Reply #17 on: April 18, 2012, 8:24:22 PM »


I got all excited and I was going to send that link to a friend who works with Pearlman, but then I went to her Facebook page and it's already there!

Thanks for the link, YT. I hope Patchett's bookstore is doing well.
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daniel_von_flanagan
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« Reply #18 on: April 18, 2012, 8:42:15 PM »

I heard an NPR interview with one of the members of the sub-committee that read a couple of hundred (!) novels to choose the finalists for the committee to consider. Man was she pissed.
Was that Maureen Corrigan?  We once had a pleasant email exchange about Halldor Laxness, so I thoroughly approve of her taste in literature. - DvF
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luder
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« Reply #19 on: April 19, 2012, 3:26:28 AM »

I'm rather pleased. Swamplandia!, by almost any measure, is a bad book. Not that I've read it. The author is lovely, though (at least in her publicity shots). Some people, I realize, think Dennis Johnson is the cat's meow. Not I. Not that I matter, of course. In addition, Johnson's "book" was published ten years ago in the Paris Review and then in one of those Best American collections. Even if they were otherwise inclined to give him the prize, the members of the Pulitzer board might quite rightly have thought that giving it to him this year was not entirely legitimate. DFW. What can I say? Never read him. His acolytes are annoying. Slate posts too many articles about him.

Most of the threads under "We Speak Volumes" are intended for people who read books, Luder.  If you do not read books, please go away.

Reread your OP, yellowtractor. You asked for "thoughts" (to your credit, you didn't close with a peremptory "discuss"). I gave you mine.
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tinyzombie
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« Reply #20 on: April 19, 2012, 7:13:41 AM »

I'm rather pleased. Swamplandia!, by almost any measure, is a bad book. Not that I've read it. The author is lovely, though (at least in her publicity shots). Some people, I realize, think Dennis Johnson is the cat's meow. Not I. Not that I matter, of course. In addition, Johnson's "book" was published ten years ago in the Paris Review and then in one of those Best American collections. Even if they were otherwise inclined to give him the prize, the members of the Pulitzer board might quite rightly have thought that giving it to him this year was not entirely legitimate. DFW. What can I say? Never read him. His acolytes are annoying. Slate posts too many articles about him.

Most of the threads under "We Speak Volumes" are intended for people who read books, Luder.  If you do not read books, please go away.

Reread your OP, yellowtractor. You asked for "thoughts" (to your credit, you didn't close with a peremptory "discuss"). I gave you mine.

Your thoughts have nothing to do with reading books. If you would like a Bloviating, Unsupported Opinion thread, you are free to start your own.
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anisogamy
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« Reply #21 on: April 19, 2012, 7:49:23 AM »

Anispouse is a big Denis Johnson fan and he, too, thinks it's a little strange that Train Dreams was nominated this year.
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stanwyck
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« Reply #22 on: April 19, 2012, 9:49:40 AM »

I also enjoyed Victoria Brownworth's response to the non-decision: No Good Novels in 2011?
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luder
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« Reply #23 on: April 19, 2012, 11:01:49 AM »

I read the piece you linked to, Stanwyck, but it seems to me that Brownsworth's criticism of the failure to award the prize is misplaced. And if I understand things correctly, she has also misunderstood the process of making the decision. The three jurors came up with the finalists but don't vote on them themselves. Rather, it's the Pulitzer board (don't know what it is or who's on it) that considers the finalists and makes the ultimate decision. I don't know if the members of this board can override the jurors and give the prize to a book that wasn't a finalist.

My considered opinion (it's not "bloviation," tinyzombie) is that, by naming the finalists they did, the jurors are guilty of dereliction of duty: nearly everybody knows that hype is mendacious, and yet these three jurors just happen to nominate three of the most hyped novels of the year (though Johnson's may not have been either a novel or of the year). I'd also note that one of the jurors, M. Cunningham, is published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. Johnson's book comes from the same publishers. Another of the jurors is published by Vintage. Need I say who published Swamplandia!? I don't think the jurors are knowingly corrupt, but I do think they know which door the food is behind.

There were probably three or four American novels published this year that were worthy of the Pulitzer. But who will have heard of them?

Oh, and tinyzombie: this thread is about the failure to award a book prize, not about reading books. One has nothing to do with the other.
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tinyzombie
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« Reply #24 on: April 19, 2012, 11:23:27 AM »

Oh, and tinyzombie: this thread is about the failure to award a book prize, not about reading books. One has nothing to do with the other.


Wrong.

One is bloviating when one pounds out opinions on things of which one has no knowledge. This thread is about a particular situation, your ignorance of which you repeatedly mentioned. You could have worded your posts differently if you merely wanted to comment on the failure to award the prize, but instead, you put your refusal to engage with the material at hand right out front for everyone to see.
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Quote from: usukprof
I think we have three of them, but the smallest one seems to be the leader.
Quote from: dolljepopp
Who needs real life when Sandra Bullock is around?
Quote from: systeme_d_
You are all my people, and I love you.
luder
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« Reply #25 on: April 19, 2012, 11:58:52 AM »

Your reasoning is badly flawed, tinyzombie. Not to have read a book is not to have no knowledge of it.
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stanwyck
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« Reply #26 on: April 19, 2012, 1:09:19 PM »

Oh, and tinyzombie: this thread is about the failure to award a book prize, not about reading books. One has nothing to do with the other.

Whoa.

Okay, it's true that you qualified your statement about Swamplandia! by saying it is a bad book "by almost any measure." That "almost" almost gives you a free pass. Sadly, you're not qualified to comment on the book using the measure to which we assign the most value: having read it.

I read the piece you linked to, Stanwyck, but it seems to me that Brownsworth's criticism of the failure to award the prize is misplaced. And if I understand things correctly, she has also misunderstood the process of making the decision. The three jurors came up with the finalists but don't vote on them themselves. Rather, it's the Pulitzer board (don't know what it is or who's on it) that considers the finalists and makes the ultimate decision. I don't know if the members of this board can override the jurors and give the prize to a book that wasn't a finalist.

I'm taking it you didn't read her follow up comment.
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yellowtractor
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« Reply #27 on: April 19, 2012, 1:23:35 PM »

Your reasoning is badly flawed, tinyzombie. Not to have read a book is not to have no knowledge of it.

Please go away.  I say this with no rancor or bitterness.  We'll all be happier if you do.
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alpha_bet
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« Reply #28 on: May 18, 2012, 1:34:30 PM »

Well, anyway, to take this thread back to actual reading...
I loved Train Dreams and Pale King. But one thing these two books have in common is that they both seemed to me sort of unfinished. If I didn't know any better I'd think Johnson's editor, too, had taken his notes and put them together for him. I didn't have a problem with that... but that did stick out in both books to me.
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