• October 30, 2014
October 30, 2014, 9:43:01 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with your Chronicle username and password
News: For all you tweeters, follow The Chronicle on Twitter.
 
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: How much of the job search process to divulge to a candidate  (Read 16536 times)
jacobi1804
New member
*
Posts: 8


« on: April 02, 2012, 9:18:18 AM »

We are seeking to fill several (at least two, possibly more) non-TT positions.  After interviewing we have decided to offer positions to A and B.  At this point several emails between various offices in the building have to be sent back and forth, at which point the candidates can be informed than an offer is in the works.  Once the formal letter is sent, the candidates have two weeks to accept or negotiate, which may result in the revision of the offer which may result in a further delay.  The result is that there can be weeks and weeks between the search committee's decision and the acceptance (or rejection) of an offer.

Early on in this process on I am contacted by candidate C, who wants to know the status of his application.  C would be a great choice if A or B decline, or if other openings emerge.  On one hand I feel like he should know the chances of an offer are not good, in case he's got a lot of eggs in our basket.  On the other hand if we did end up offering him a position I wouldn't want to damage the relationship (or the chance of him accepting) by letting him know (a) he wasn't our first choice and that (b) we were not the first choice of our first choice!

So I'm wondering what people do in situations like this. 
Logged
shrek
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 1,948


« Reply #1 on: April 02, 2012, 9:33:11 AM »

We've handled this before by being pretty up front, "We have an offer out currently, but would love to keep you in the candidacy pool."
Logged
brixton
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 3,127


« Reply #2 on: April 02, 2012, 12:05:25 PM »

I'm usually a little bit more cryptic, just because I have been turned down by a candidate a or b, and if c is very viable, I want her to know that.  I say something more along the lines of:  "We're still mired in the process, but will of course let you know.   Please keep us posted if you receive any offers or your interest in the job search changes."  Since you've got a date from offer to acceptance, I'd cite that for when you hope to have a response.  Something like:  "We're hoping to have every thing done by April 14th."
Logged
jacobi1804
New member
*
Posts: 8


« Reply #3 on: April 03, 2012, 8:03:44 AM »

Thanks to both of you for the reply.  I've usually gone along with what brixton suggests, although including the date makes good sense.  I guess C can read between the lines.
Logged
tw1554
New member
*
Posts: 15


« Reply #4 on: April 15, 2012, 1:58:53 AM »

I routinely serve on a search committee and struggled with how much info to share...it didn't take long before I developed a strategy that mirrors Brixton's advice...first truth: the process can move slowly at times, second truth: candidate 'c' is still being considered, third truth: share anticipated dates or agree to call with an update (even if nothing has changed) by a specific date...and if 'c' has other offers encourage the candidate to do what is best for his/her family (in other words, show compassion).

Best of luck.  Any chance I'm candidate 'c'?  :-) :-)

SWAK!
Logged
nocalprof
Senior member
****
Posts: 797


« Reply #5 on: April 20, 2012, 11:23:56 PM »

I was candidate C once, and happily negotiated an offer in May after candidates A and B both dragged out negotiations and went elsewhere.  I'm happy as a clam, and so is the department, 4 years later (post tenure).

I didn't have a problem knowing I was choice #3.  Its super competitive out there, and everyone realizes that.
Logged
larryc
Troll Proof
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 22,994

Be excellent to each other.


WWW
« Reply #6 on: April 20, 2012, 11:45:44 PM »

We've handled this before by being pretty up front, "We have an offer out currently, but would love to keep you in the candidacy pool."

I prefer Shrek's response because it lets the candidate know that the initial offer at least has gone to someone else and that she should not turn anything else down while waiting on you.
« Last Edit: April 20, 2012, 11:46:00 PM by larryc » Logged

Trolling for sex is not what this forum is all about.
gekko
Senior member
****
Posts: 637


« Reply #7 on: April 30, 2012, 8:12:05 PM »

nocal, do you think this knowledge may actually have helped you from a negotiation standpoint? Care to elaborate on how the offer/process occurred?
Logged
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.9 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
  • 1255 Twenty-Third St., N.W.
  • Washington, D.C. 20037
subscribe today

Get the insight you need for success in academe.