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Author Topic: CV Etiquette Question  (Read 10823 times)
carolynkeene
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« on: April 01, 2012, 1:48:24 AM »

If you are accepted to a conference and cannot attend, do you note the conference on your CV as "accepted but declined"? This may be a silly question, however, I saw another student list it on his CV and I was curious if this is proper CV etiquette.
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lohai0
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« Reply #1 on: April 01, 2012, 2:10:06 AM »

This is padding. If you put this is cheapens your real accomplishments. (See also: Stupid CV Tricks Thread)
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systeme_d_
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« Reply #2 on: April 01, 2012, 2:19:18 AM »

This is padding. If you put this is cheapens your real accomplishments. (See also: Stupid CV Tricks Thread)

Yup.
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hegemony
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« Reply #3 on: April 01, 2012, 3:35:36 AM »

In short, no, it makes you look unprofessional and desperate for lines on your CV.  And it's also clear that you don't show up for conferences (see relevant thread on no-shows.)
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seniorscholar
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« Reply #4 on: April 01, 2012, 11:03:55 AM »

If you absolutely have to mention this because it was a significant accomplishment for someone at your career stage -- major national convention for which people in your field will know there were 60+ proposals sent for each slot on the panel, for instance -- it might be ok to mention it in an application letter for a grant, though not on your c.v., as long as you make clear that there were extraordinary circumstances that prevented your attending, and that you notified the conference committee chair in ample time to find a replacement paper for the panel.

And by the way, it is not extraordinarily unusual to have someone else read a paper at a conference when last-minute emergencies arise (serious illness, or death in the family are the usual ones). You notify the panel chair, sending your completed paper by attachment and also sending the PowerPoint if there is one, and the panel chair finds someone trustworthy who would be attending that session anyway (and therefore has some familiarity with the topic and can at least pronounce the names) to read the paper. In that case, the c.v. could list the paper title and conference, with a parenthetical note something like "read for me due to my last-minute illness by Scholar Name"
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carolynkeene
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« Reply #5 on: April 02, 2012, 1:37:30 AM »

Thank you all for your advice/insight, will avoid unnecessary padding!
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youllneverwalkalone
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« Reply #6 on: April 02, 2012, 7:42:52 AM »

What exactly did you get accepted? DO you have your abstract published in the abstract book? Or a paper get in the conference proceedings?

If it was a poster and a oral presentation, did any of your co-author replace you?

In all thesecases you can mention your contribution without having being phisically there.

Otherwise just forget it alltogether :)

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aprilmay
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« Reply #7 on: April 05, 2012, 10:38:32 AM »

Do not put this on your CV. You did not make the presentation. You are also advertising that you submitted a paper and then withdrew from the conference. It looks bad. If a co-author presented for you, that can be included on your CV as long as it is clear that someone else was presenting.
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hungry_ghost
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« Reply #8 on: April 05, 2012, 12:51:04 PM »

Funny, I was just thinking about a similar situation.

Several years ago, I was invited to contribute a paper to an international conference in my area of specialization, held far from home. I made it clear that I would not be able to attend, but at the organizer's request, I still wrote a paper and submitted it. It was included in the proceedings, which were printed up and distributed, though never properly "published" with a nice press. They had hoped to publish a conference volume, but it never quite got off the ground.

On my CV I list it under conference papers, and add "presented in absentia". No idea if anyone actually read my paper at the conference, but I did invest a bit of time writing it up. I don't think it is padding. It is just a very odd situation, and this is the best solution I can think of.

Now, if I had a paper accepted but I neither attended nor sent a written paper, I would not list it.

I do list certain "declined" awards/fellowships on my cv, and I don't think it is always bad to list competitive opportunities that you were awarded but unable to accept. But the default should be to exclude such things, and you should only include them if there is a strong reason to override this default.
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jerriblank
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« Reply #9 on: April 26, 2012, 10:21:38 PM »

I have a somewhat similar question.

I am a grad student and my supervisor was slated to give a talk at a conference workshop. He is unable to attend and I am filling in. Can I list this on my CV as a presentation? I am not sure, since he will be listed in the program, but I am giving the talk and putting a lot of work in it. I thought it would be ok to list myself as co-author on my CV, but then someone told me I should not even put my name on the presentation title slide when I am talking so now I am not sure...
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systeme_d_
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No T, no shade. Usually.


« Reply #10 on: April 27, 2012, 12:57:28 AM »

Jerriblank, in my discipline, what you are considering would be extremely unethical and awfully unwise.

If your supervisor is not listing you as a co-author, you are not allowed to decide on your own that you are one.
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jerriblank
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« Reply #11 on: April 27, 2012, 2:09:16 AM »

ok thanks,

i did not mean co-author (there is no abstracts or anything in print, other than he was advertised to give a talk on subject x), i just meant co-presenter or somehow indicate on my cv i made/delivered the talk.

it is not a presentation of a research project, just sort of a broad overview of the field and its potential applications. i am both making the talk and delivering it so i thought it was a bit weird to make and deliver a presentation and put my supervisors name on it (and get no credit). as i see it, essentially i am a replacement for a last minute drop out, and i have heard people sometimes put that on their cv and sometimes not, although they were not the students of the drop out so i was just wondering. someone then suggested maybe to list us as co-presenters or something, since even though he is not involved in the talk, he was the original slated speaker and it gives him credit, and also me credit for giving the talk. i had never heard of that before so i thought i would check.

and of course, i would not have done anything without talking to him, i am quite new at this so i wanted to check what i was asking for/about was not unreasonable before i broached the subject... he didn't really say anything other than in passing tell me he was not going to make the meeting and could i give the talk so i wasn't sure how that worked in terms of if i could claim some credit...i guess its a good thing i asked here first so i don't ask him if i can do something unethical (and unwise) lol.
« Last Edit: April 27, 2012, 2:10:34 AM by jerriblank » Logged
scampster
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« Reply #12 on: April 27, 2012, 4:31:27 AM »

Jerri, this might also be field dependent (even broadly, like STEM vs humanities). I've seen this happen before and it would be really really weird for someone in my field to stand up and give a talk that they wrote and only put the advisor on the title slide. I would assume that you had not done any of the work and were just presenting the slides, which is not the case here. So even if the original program listed just the senior author, the title slide would list both people as co-authors.

But... you don't get to decide that unilaterally, so I think you need to broach the topic with your advisor. Frankly, in my field, I would think your advisor was a schmuck if he didn't automatically say something like "You are writing the entire talk. Of course you are a co-author."

After the talk, then you can worry about whether/if you should put it on your CV - again, in my field, it wouldn't be weird to list this as a presentation.
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polly_mer
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Have you worked on that project today?


« Reply #13 on: April 27, 2012, 8:16:42 AM »

I agree with Scampster.  In my STEM fields, what often happens is that the advisor gets an invite and sends a postdoc or graduate student.

You don't get to unilaterally decide that you are coauthor, but, realistically, you should be a coauthor if you are writing most of the talk and delivering it.  Your name would go on the title slide and you would put this talk on your CV.


The only unethical part would be if you claimed this as a presentation on your CV as coauthor when your advisor made the talk and at the last minute sent you to read it from the notes. 

Talk to your advisor.

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