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Author Topic: graduate students and sabbatical  (Read 11838 times)
toothpaste
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« on: March 12, 2012, 7:34:39 AM »

What do you do with your graduate students when you go on sabbatical? Continue to work with them or hand them off to someone else for the year? Do you refuse to accept students who plan to complete their projects when you are going to be on sabbatical? Does it make a difference whether they want you as major professor or simply a reader on their committee?
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peppergal
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« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2012, 9:40:32 AM »

One of my committee members was on sabbatical for part of my dissertation time.  He continued to advise me by email and skype.
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seniorscholar
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« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2012, 10:16:15 AM »

I've gone on sabbatical with up to three dissertations in progress (at various stages) as supervisor and continued my supervision by e-mail. None of them have contacted me with superfluous questions, and I often have had to be quite stern to get a chapter draft sent to me so I can see if there have been any significant problems. When I'm far away at a library or archive, it's generally somewhere that I can look things up quickly if need be; when I'm in town writing, I come in to campus about once a month for mail and library books, and generally take any available dissertation students out to lunch while I'm there. But clearly the situation for humanities faculty with students at the dissertation stage is different than it would be in some other fields.
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aprilmay
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« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2012, 10:26:27 AM »

I also continue to fully advise them.
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janewales
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« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2012, 11:34:12 AM »


We are expected to continue to advise our graduate students on sabbatical. Our sabbatical leave applications have a section where we are to outline plans for our graduate students, and while I've never heard of anyone being refused a sabbatical because those plans weren't adequate, the culture pretty clearly indicates that sabbatical does not remove advising responsibility.

I'm on sabbatical right now; I have a recently-completed doctoral student I continue to work with, along with 2 current PhD advisees and 3 more whose committees I'm on. They aren't all at the same stage, and so they don't all represent the same kind of work, but I do stay in touch with them and, since I haven't left the city, I meet with them as necessary. I share some of these students with a colleague who is also on sabbatical and is out of the country, but s/he continues to advise regularly via e-mail and Skype.
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ruralguy
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« Reply #5 on: March 15, 2012, 2:09:02 PM »

Yup, my adviser went on sabbatical during my diss, and we met on occasion, etc.

I only have undergrads now, but I was a reader for a senior thesis while I was on sabbatical.

But, especially for grad students, I think you have to accept that this duty will continue through
sabbatical. Now, if it helps, you can have them go to some other faculty member or perhaps a post-doc or
advanced student, or faculty member at another school if they have questions of a more immediate nature.
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usukprof
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« Reply #6 on: March 24, 2012, 9:15:02 AM »

In my field it is increasingly common to do a 6-month roving sabbatical; this is what I plan to do.  I'll visit several places for a few weeks at a time, interact online while gone, continue to hold my weekly research group meetings by video conference, and interact in person in-between with little disruption to my students.  I can't imagine doing an old-school disappear for a year sabbatical and stall my research agenda.
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ruralguy
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« Reply #7 on: March 27, 2012, 4:08:31 PM »

Well, this depends on discipline and the nature of one's research, but I don't think most people are "disappearing."
That gives the impression that they aren't really doing work..they are on some sort of vacation. Most are working extremely hard,
but don't wish to "go into the office" and deal with the usual bs. Now, if you run a big lab, ity might be hard to go away for a full year to some other big wigs lab, but I have known people at many different types of schools who do that. If anything, internet makes the one-year
traditional model much easier.
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