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News: Talk online about your experiences as an adjunct, visiting assistant professor, postdoc, or other contract faculty member.
 
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Author Topic: adjuncting after retirement  (Read 28766 times)
arts4ever
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« on: August 17, 2011, 12:43:42 PM »

As posted before in another thread, I would like to look for adjuncting in the NYC area after I retire from Big No-Name School in Another Area. But I'm feeling paranoid after applying for an assistant professor position that I really wanted but didn't even get an interview.
I am wondering: will my age (mid-50s) and experience (been full prof for 12 years) work for me or against me in looking for adjuncting? FWIW, most people think I am younger from looking at me, but that won't matter because they will know my age from when I earned my degrees.
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zharkov
or, the modern Prometheus.
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« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2011, 8:26:23 AM »


We certainly hire people with failed retirements as adjuncts.  (Failed retirements is a half joking way to refer to people who "retire" and keep working.)  I suspect you'd be particularly valuable working with grad students and senior undergrads.  You would also be a good candidate for VAP positions, at least in my opinion.
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__________
Zharkov's Razor:
Adapting Zharkov a bit to this situation, ignorance and confusion can explain a lot.
geonerd
As always, loving the irony and a
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Do not take the bait.


« Reply #2 on: August 21, 2011, 11:42:14 AM »

My university hires retired or semi-retired academics who want to keep one toe in academia and pick up a course here and there.
« Last Edit: August 21, 2011, 11:42:55 AM by geonerd » Logged

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saguaro
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The burnt hand teaches best.


« Reply #3 on: August 21, 2011, 11:55:21 AM »

Don't forget about part-time teaching at a community college. You should have no problem getting hired there.
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juvenal
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Juvenal


« Reply #4 on: August 21, 2011, 1:49:20 PM »

Don't forget about part-time teaching at a community college. You should have no problem getting hired there.

Well, I teach at a CC, have retirement not far off, tho' farther off now that my portfolio seems to have lately met a financial vampire.  I plan to adjunct maybe one course a year (spring semester--fall around here is too lovely to torpedo with immurement in a classroom) to "keep my hand in," and to keep from going completely inert above the neck.

But, while you may get an adjunct gig at a CC, you still have to be OK in the classroom.  My keen-eyed-in-observation Chair divides adjuncts into two groups: those who can teach to our expectations (most) and those who should put in a sack and drowned.  She has used some sacks.
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[A] daily irritant, unrelieved over a period of time, can interfere more with one's peace of mind than events of national import."
                                    -J. McLaughlin
glowdart
that's a thing that I keep in the back of my head
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« Reply #5 on: August 21, 2011, 1:58:21 PM »

But I'm feeling paranoid after applying for an assistant professor position that I really wanted but didn't even get an interview.

From an SC point of view, there's a huge difference between someone applying for an Asst. Prof job from your position and applying for post-retirement adjuncting gigs.  We'd be happy to have you for the latter.  We wouldn't even look at your application seriously for the former unless there were clear indications in the cover letter that this job was somehow a good move for you and that you understood you'd be stepping down in pay, down in rank, down in authority and likely up (or way up) in teaching load.  And even then... we'd have concerns. 

But for an adjunct gig?  Not a problem at all, so long as you're good in the classroom and aren't going to be a diva about scheduling or teaching intro classes. 
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arts4ever
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« Reply #6 on: August 22, 2011, 8:06:47 AM »

Thanks folks! That was what I was hoping to hear.
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