• November 1, 2014
November 01, 2014, 5:55:15 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with your Chronicle username and password
News: For all you tweeters, follow The Chronicle on Twitter.
 
Pages: 1 2 [3]
  Print  
Author Topic: New Book Prices on Amazon: What Gives Here?  (Read 34521 times)
daniel_von_flanagan
<redacted>
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 13,291

Works all day. Posts all night. Needs sleep.


« Reply #30 on: October 29, 2011, 6:56:14 AM »

you have no actual interest in academics except in pretending that it is somehow comparable to actual scholarship. - DvF

Clarification: "it"="the book you are hawking" - DvF
« Last Edit: October 29, 2011, 6:57:57 AM by daniel_von_flanagan » Logged

The U.S. Education Department is establishing a new national research center to study colleges' ability to successfully educate the country's growing numbers of academically underprepared administrators.
francishamit
Junior member
**
Posts: 96


« Reply #31 on: March 01, 2012, 6:03:59 AM »

It's been awhile since I checked these forums.  I had a rather serious illness, so please pardon my tardiness in responding. As for academics I do as much or more research for my Civil War novels as the standard historian.  In fact, one of my frustrations with so-called academics is the number of errors and the amount of sloppy research I find when crafting my own narratives.  Much of this is based in excessive reverence for previously published work which skews original sources to fit a predefined theory of events.  Then there are those sources themselves, many of which fail to consider known facts or deliberately conceal them.  Let me put is this way:  an "official" record may not be an accurate one.  And sometimes people just get it wrong.  I recently came across a newspaper article where a certain professor stated that a certain set of records had been burned after the Civil War.  The documents in question not only survive, but are accessible in a museum not far from the institution he teaches at and are also available in microform. I will be consulting these documents for forthcoming books in that narrative. My research is continuous and ongoing and has been for 14 years..

Now as for genre, I write fiction and recognize that word only as a necessary marketing shorthand, not as a limitation of my craft.  And as for academics, I have the terminal degree in my field, from the institution recognized as the number one program in the world.  Not that that really matters because there are quite a few of my peers who have been very successful without any formal training of this type.   The real problem, as I see it, is that Creative Writing is not and never has been an academic discipline.  All of the theory in the world will not change that.  It's about telling stories.   
Logged
daniel_von_flanagan
<redacted>
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 13,291

Works all day. Posts all night. Needs sleep.


« Reply #32 on: March 01, 2012, 2:36:10 PM »

Back to hawk your books some more?

And as for academics, I have the terminal degree in my field, from the institution recognized as the number one program in the world.
An AA degree from DeVry in HVAC is not normally considered a scholarly credential.  - DvF
Logged

The U.S. Education Department is establishing a new national research center to study colleges' ability to successfully educate the country's growing numbers of academically underprepared administrators.
proftowanda
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 6,946

"Righter of wrongs, queen beyond compare."


« Reply #33 on: March 02, 2012, 11:02:47 PM »

Information in this interview explains much.  Meh.

http://www.examiner.com/books-in-los-angeles/the-shenandoah-spy-interview-with-author-francis-hamit
Logged

"Face it, girls.  I'm older, and I have more insurance."     -- Towanda!
daniel_von_flanagan
<redacted>
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 13,291

Works all day. Posts all night. Needs sleep.


« Reply #34 on: March 03, 2012, 2:45:32 AM »

I am sure that his "lot of friends who are African-American" would agree that "at that time a white woman in the South suffered many of the same disadvantages as an African-American woman".  The same friends probably helped him craft the servant character's speech into the authentic Uncle Remus vernacular.  (Based on what little bit is available in Amazon's "see inside this book" option.) - DvF
Logged

The U.S. Education Department is establishing a new national research center to study colleges' ability to successfully educate the country's growing numbers of academically underprepared administrators.
francishamit
Junior member
**
Posts: 96


« Reply #35 on: March 28, 2012, 6:12:34 AM »

Well, since you asked.  The language for the African American characters in that book was sourced in contemporary documents.  Those include "Belle Boyd in Camp and Prison" and the writings of Belle's cousin David Hunter Strother, who was a Union Army intelligence officer and topographical engineer (map maker) aka "Porter Crayon", a famous writer and illustrator for Harper's before the war and the author of many popular travel books where he quotes African American slaves at length. Other authors of the period , such a John  Esten Cooke also use those conventions. My own reservation about them comes from the fact that Belle did not write her own book.  It was actually written by George Augusta Sala, a English writer and theatrical impresario who also acted as a propagandist there for the Confederate cause.     Someone more familiar with Linguistics than I am might tell you that those speech patterns derive from the parts of Africa where their ancestors were captured and sold into slavery. 

My conclusions about the disadvantages suffered by women of that era are hardly unique or groundbreaking.  Belle Boyd is considered something of a feminist icon, despite being a Confederate loyalist, because she defied convention, and, among other things, was the first woman in American history to be formally commissioned an army officer; a Captain of Scouts at the age of 18.  While the book is fiction almost every character in it is based upon  a real person and the narrative follows the known events surrounding Stonewall Jackson's Valley Campaign in 1862.   What is established fact also is that Belle Boyd and her personal servant Eliza Corsey remained friends all of their lives. Belle died in 1900.  Eliza in 1910. 

And if you want to see how I "hawk" books, I suggest you look at my pages on Facebook and LinkedIn.  As for the DeVry credit, I am an alumni (no degree) of the Keller Graduate School of Management in Chicago, but I attended when it was still an independent institution, before DeVry acquired it. At the time I was doing a lot of Business Journalism and found the night courses in Accounting, Finance and other topics useful background.  Being able to read a balance sheet is very useful when you work that beat.    This was after I received my MFA in Fiction from the Iowa Writers Workshop at the University of Iowa.

And please do not interpret any of the above as simple self-promotion. You opened the door. I have nowhere mentioned the other projects I have ongoing.  This began when I was trying to share my real-world experience as a publisher and explain why things are the way they are with Amazon.   
Logged
daniel_von_flanagan
<redacted>
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 13,291

Works all day. Posts all night. Needs sleep.


« Reply #36 on: March 28, 2012, 7:19:37 AM »

Well, since you asked.  The language for the African American characters in that book was sourced in contemporary documents.
Well, that's all right then - the vernacular with which you encumber your African-American characters is based on the observations by privileged white folk of the time, who surely have an accurate ear and no propensity to stereotype.

Quote
Someone more familiar with Linguistics than I am might tell you that those speech patterns derive from the parts of Africa where their ancestors were captured and sold into slavery. 
Or they might tell me something else altogether.

Quote
My conclusions about the disadvantages suffered by women of that era are hardly unique or groundbreaking.
You didn't just say that white women of the area were treated badly.  You asserted parity between the condition of white women of the period and their African-American counterparts.

Quote
And if you want to see how I "hawk" books, I suggest you look at my pages on Facebook and LinkedIn.
All I can go by is the substance of your posts on this forum, which are 100% about your books and only mention higher education derisively.
I remind you of the language to which you agreed when you registered:
Quote
Posting spam of any kind in a post or in your signature line (whether it's commercial spam or an attempt to use the forums to sell or promote your books, Web site, etc.) will result in an immediate ban.

As for the DeVry reference, I was being snide about your "terminal degree" claim.  It never occurred to me that I'd hit so close to the mark. - DvF
Logged

The U.S. Education Department is establishing a new national research center to study colleges' ability to successfully educate the country's growing numbers of academically underprepared administrators.
tinyzombie
She of the Badass Abs, and a
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 15,137

elevate from this point on - chuck d


« Reply #37 on: March 28, 2012, 11:38:33 AM »

As for the DeVry credit, I am an alumni (no degree) of the Keller Graduate School of Management in Chicago, but I attended when it was still an independent institution, before DeVry acquired it.

I'm staying away from everything else that you've got wrong, since DVF nailed it.

A) You cannot be "an alumni."

B) You cannot be an ALUMNUS (correct term) if you HAVE NO DEGREE.
Logged

Quote from: usukprof
I think we have three of them, but the smallest one seems to be the leader.
Quote from: dolljepopp
Who needs real life when Sandra Bullock is around?
Quote from: systeme_d_
You are all my people, and I love you.
proftowanda
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 6,946

"Righter of wrongs, queen beyond compare."


« Reply #38 on: March 28, 2012, 12:28:55 PM »

Actually, an alumna (in this case) or alumnus is a former student.  No degree is required.

To everything else DvF said:  Agreed.
Logged

"Face it, girls.  I'm older, and I have more insurance."     -- Towanda!
tinyzombie
She of the Badass Abs, and a
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 15,137

elevate from this point on - chuck d


« Reply #39 on: March 28, 2012, 2:35:06 PM »

Actually, an alumna (in this case) or alumnus is a former student.  No degree is required.

To everything else DvF said:  Agreed.

Technically, yes, although in practice, the word is used to refer to degree-holders. Former students are non-grad alumni.
Logged

Quote from: usukprof
I think we have three of them, but the smallest one seems to be the leader.
Quote from: dolljepopp
Who needs real life when Sandra Bullock is around?
Quote from: systeme_d_
You are all my people, and I love you.
proftowanda
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 6,946

"Righter of wrongs, queen beyond compare."


« Reply #40 on: March 28, 2012, 8:38:04 PM »

Actually, an alumna (in this case) or alumnus is a former student.  No degree is required.

To everything else DvF said:  Agreed.

Technically, yes, although in practice, the word is used to refer to degree-holders. Former students are non-grad alumni.

Perhaps where you are?  I worked for eons in an alumni office of a U.S. college and had to learn all about the definitions.  (Thank heavens that I had taken Latin so at least did not need to learn the us, i, a, ae suffixes.)
Logged

"Face it, girls.  I'm older, and I have more insurance."     -- Towanda!
aandsdean
I feel affirmed that I'm truly a 8,000+ post
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 8,055

Positively impactful on stakeholder synergies


« Reply #41 on: March 28, 2012, 9:35:18 PM »

Actually, an alumna (in this case) or alumnus is a former student.  No degree is required.

To everything else DvF said:  Agreed.

Technically, yes, although in practice, the word is used to refer to degree-holders. Former students are non-grad alumni.

Perhaps where you are?  I worked for eons in an alumni office of a U.S. college and had to learn all about the definitions.  (Thank heavens that I had taken Latin so at least did not need to learn the us, i, a, ae suffixes.)

There's a reason Alumni and Development offices define every person who's taken a single breath of air at a school in a student capacity as "alumni," and it's not technical precision.
Logged

Que scay-je?
Pages: 1 2 [3]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.9 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
  • 1255 Twenty-Third St., N.W.
  • Washington, D.C. 20037
subscribe today

Get the insight you need for success in academe.