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Author Topic: H1B assistance--before or after the first interview???  (Read 89829 times)
yoyoma1
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Posts: 7


« Reply #15 on: February 16, 2012, 1:14:50 PM »

An application for an H1B visa is not merely facilitated by the academic institution.  The required role of the institution is to petition the federal government for the visa (i.e., the sponsoring institution is required to submit the paperwork, and often pays the fees).  An institution that isn't willing to ever sponsor H1B applications is an institution that isn't likely to be worth much attention from the OP.

The problem is that there is a continuum between institutions that will almost always sponsor an H1B visa (e.g., most research universities) and institutions that will only rarely do so (e.g., many but certainly not all community colleges).

OP: It it not always clear whether or not a given institution will be willing or able to sponsor an H1B application.  This presents a problem, because while one doesn't want to go through the the whole process of applying and interviewing for a position if an institution won't ever sponsor a visa, one also doesn't want to hurt one's chances at those schools that do indeed sponsor visas but that consider it a bit of a hassle and an unwelcome drain on institution finances.

This kind of thing requires case-by-case judgment calls by the applicant, calls that would ideally benefit from some extra research (e.g., does the institution have an International Office, and does that office have online visa resources for new professorial hires?  If so, then the institution very likely sponsors visas, and the whole visa issue should probably only be addressed when and if an offer is ever made).

Hi, sorry for digging up the old thread here, but I couldn't find much info on community colleges & H1B visa sponsorship as I need some updated info on this topic.

I've learned that even some major research universities won't sponsor H1B for lecturer positions in English, and I guess most-if not all-community colleges won't either--even if they're TT positions. Am I right? But I think it also depends on the region. I don't even bother with community colleges in Southern & Midwestern states, and it seems very unlikely to get visa sponsorship from community colleges even if they are located in major cities like NYC or LA--some job postings specifically say they won't do visa sponsorship.

These days most schools require electronic application and there's this screening question, "Are you legally authorized to work in the US?" When I see this, I just cancel my application. I'm a Canadian permanent resident who can't yet apply for a NAFTA visa--only Canadian citizens are allowed for that--so I need H1B sponsorship. So how do you guys (foreign professionals) go about this?

I had an interview for a TT position at a SLAC in NJ, and at the end of the interview I was asked the same question. It was awkward when I said. "Not yet," and the search committee chair said the school made him ask that question. It seems even more difficult these days to get visa sponsorship, (especially for English & other humanities positions), considering the fact that many schools use the e-verify system.

So should I focus on universities on the East Coast or West Coast? What's your plan? I'd appreciate any response, but I want to hear from foreign humanities scholars & students who are in a similar situation.
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zharkov
or, the modern Prometheus.
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« Reply #16 on: February 16, 2012, 7:14:23 PM »

It seems even more difficult these days to get visa sponsorship, (especially for English & other humanities positions), considering the fact that many schools use the e-verify system.

Since some faculty positions in the humanities get 200 or 300 applications, there is no practical need for the school to even consider someone who needs a visa.  If, on the other hand, there was a shortage of qualified applicants, then it would be a different story entirely.
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__________
Zharkov's Razor:
Adapting Zharkov a bit to this situation, ignorance and confusion can explain a lot.
charlesr
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« Reply #17 on: February 17, 2012, 9:05:08 AM »

Apply for the jobs.  Hope for the best.  Expect the worst.
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yoyoma1
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« Reply #18 on: February 17, 2012, 9:32:49 AM »

It seems even more difficult these days to get visa sponsorship, (especially for English & other humanities positions), considering the fact that many schools use the e-verify system.

Since some faculty positions in the humanities get 200 or 300 applications, there is no practical need for the school to even consider someone who needs a visa.  If, on the other hand, there was a shortage of qualified applicants, then it would be a different story entirely.

Wrong. I've seen some foreigners get hired over more qualified US applicants. Most of them tend to be minority women, especially Chinese women these days, as many US schools in financial trouble compete for international students, especially Chinese and other Asian students.
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zharkov
or, the modern Prometheus.
Distinguished Senior Member
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Posts: 9,567


« Reply #19 on: February 17, 2012, 10:08:19 AM »

It seems even more difficult these days to get visa sponsorship, (especially for English & other humanities positions), considering the fact that many schools use the e-verify system.

Since some faculty positions in the humanities get 200 or 300 applications, there is no practical need for the school to even consider someone who needs a visa.  If, on the other hand, there was a shortage of qualified applicants, then it would be a different story entirely.

Wrong. I've seen some foreigners get hired over more qualified US applicants. Most of them tend to be minority women, especially Chinese women these days, as many US schools in financial trouble compete for international students, especially Chinese and other Asian students.

An exception that proves the rule.

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__________
Zharkov's Razor:
Adapting Zharkov a bit to this situation, ignorance and confusion can explain a lot.
yoyoma1
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Posts: 7


« Reply #20 on: February 17, 2012, 10:20:40 AM »


[/quote]

An exception that proves the rule.


[/quote]

There's no such a rule. Each hiring can be very unpredictable, and there is a practical need as I mentioned above for some schools, especially the ones in major cities with a large immigrant population, to consider someone who needs a visa.
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tinyzombie
She of the Badass Abs, and a
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elevate from this point on - chuck d


« Reply #21 on: February 17, 2012, 10:39:51 AM »


Quote

An exception that proves the rule.



There's no such a rule. Each hiring can be very unpredictable, and there is a practical need as I mentioned above for some schools, especially the ones in major cities with a large immigrant population, to consider someone who needs a visa.

That's a pretty big statement. Back it up, if you please?
« Last Edit: February 17, 2012, 10:40:41 AM by tinyzombie » Logged

Quote from: usukprof
I think we have three of them, but the smallest one seems to be the leader.
Quote from: dolljepopp
Who needs real life when Sandra Bullock is around?
Quote from: systeme_d_
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yoyoma1
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Posts: 7


« Reply #22 on: February 17, 2012, 10:46:06 AM »

It seems even more difficult these days to get visa sponsorship, (especially for English & other humanities positions), considering the fact that many schools use the e-verify system.

Since some faculty positions in the humanities get 200 or 300 applications, there is no practical need for the school to even consider someone who needs a visa.  If, on the other hand, there was a shortage of qualified applicants, then it would be a different story entirely.

Wrong. I've seen some foreigners get hired over more qualified US applicants. Most of them tend to be minority women, especially Chinese women these days, as many US schools in financial trouble compete for international students, especially Chinese and other Asian students.

An exception that proves the rule.



Check out the number of H1B visa non-immigrants employed by US institutions:http://www.myvisajobs.com/H1B-Visa-090-2010-SO.htm. These are not all TT positions and many are in the humanities. I have also learned that even community colleges and SLACs in the middle of nowhere hire foreigners who NEED A VISA SPONSORSHIP.

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yoyoma1
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Posts: 7


« Reply #23 on: February 17, 2012, 10:55:31 AM »


Quote

An exception that proves the rule.



There's no such a rule. Each hiring can be very unpredictable, and there is a practical need as I mentioned above for some schools, especially the ones in major cities with a large immigrant population, to consider someone who needs a visa.

That's a pretty big statement. Back it up, if you please?

No, zharkov made a big statement that might be true only in some parts of the US, but I've learned even the Deep South is changing.
« Last Edit: February 17, 2012, 10:58:53 AM by yoyoma1 » Logged
tinyzombie
She of the Badass Abs, and a
Distinguished Senior Member
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Posts: 15,137

elevate from this point on - chuck d


« Reply #24 on: February 17, 2012, 11:08:01 AM »


Quote

An exception that proves the rule.



There's no such a rule. Each hiring can be very unpredictable, and there is a practical need as I mentioned above for some schools, especially the ones in major cities with a large immigrant population, to consider someone who needs a visa.

That's a pretty big statement. Back it up, if you please?

No, zharkov made a big statement that might be true only in some parts of the US, but I've learned even the Deep South is changing.

I didn't ask zharkov about his statement; I asked you about yours.
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Quote from: usukprof
I think we have three of them, but the smallest one seems to be the leader.
Quote from: dolljepopp
Who needs real life when Sandra Bullock is around?
Quote from: systeme_d_
You are all my people, and I love you.
yoyoma1
New member
*
Posts: 7


« Reply #25 on: February 17, 2012, 11:39:20 AM »


Quote

An exception that proves the rule.



There's no such a rule. Each hiring can be very unpredictable, and there is a practical need as I mentioned above for some schools, especially the ones in major cities with a large immigrant population, to consider someone who needs a visa.

That's a pretty big statement. Back it up, if you please?

No, zharkov made a big statement that might be true only in some parts of the US, but I've learned even the Deep South is changing.

I didn't ask zharkov about his statement; I asked you about yours.

Didn't I say this:

[/quote]

many US schools in financial trouble compete for international students, especially Chinese and other Asian students.
[/quote]

So there's a practical reason to consider foreign applicants who need H1B visa sponsorship. You guys are a snaky group of people, aren't you?

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tinyzombie
She of the Badass Abs, and a
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 15,137

elevate from this point on - chuck d


« Reply #26 on: February 17, 2012, 11:44:30 AM »


Quote

An exception that proves the rule.



There's no such a rule. Each hiring can be very unpredictable, and there is a practical need as I mentioned above for some schools, especially the ones in major cities with a large immigrant population, to consider someone who needs a visa.

That's a pretty big statement. Back it up, if you please?

No, zharkov made a big statement that might be true only in some parts of the US, but I've learned even the Deep South is changing.

I didn't ask zharkov about his statement; I asked you about yours.

Didn't I say this:


many US schools in financial trouble compete for international students, especially Chinese and other Asian students.
[/quote]

So there's a practical reason to consider foreign applicants who need H1B visa sponsorship. You guys are a snaky group of people, aren't you?


[/quote]

I still think you're generalizing like it's your job, and that doesn't go over well here. In addition, it would be easier to read your posts if you learned to use the quote function, and if you didn't get all bent out of shape over a simple request for clarification.

And it's "snarky," not "snaky" (although some here may be that).
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Quote from: usukprof
I think we have three of them, but the smallest one seems to be the leader.
Quote from: dolljepopp
Who needs real life when Sandra Bullock is around?
Quote from: systeme_d_
You are all my people, and I love you.
yoyoma1
New member
*
Posts: 7


« Reply #27 on: February 17, 2012, 11:49:33 AM »

Well, it's a d-mbass group of people here picking on stupid little things. Forget it. I'll move on.
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