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Author Topic: Cycling to Work  (Read 469070 times)
marigolds
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« Reply #2025 on: April 02, 2012, 1:03:48 PM »

Do any of you do this crazy thing? (I will underline that this 45 minute ride would be up a pretty significant hill and little riding on bike paths or bike lanes.) How can you ride in city traffic and listen to podcasts? I can't think of anything more distracting from focusing on the road!

(This is the chief executive of a pretty big technology company. You think he would be smarter? Or that his board will be discouraging him from doing this any more)

Quote
Daniel Friedmann, long-time chief executive officer of MacDonald Dettwiler and Associates Ltd., cycles year-round to and from his home in Vancouverís Kitsilano neighbourhood to the space-technology companyís Richmond headquarters. He pedals 45 minutes each way on a bike he bought at Costco, listening to podcast lectures on an iPod.

Mr. Friedmann is an idiot. Anyone on a bike listening to an iPod or whatever is just inviting death.

Clearly he's not the brightest. Who buys a bike at Costco?

I put my right earphone in and leave the left one out (my traffic side.)  My commute is 90% bike paths, and only 10% streets.

I thought that would be a safe compromise.  Should I not?
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octoprof
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« Reply #2026 on: April 02, 2012, 1:21:09 PM »

Do any of you do this crazy thing? (I will underline that this 45 minute ride would be up a pretty significant hill and little riding on bike paths or bike lanes.) How can you ride in city traffic and listen to podcasts? I can't think of anything more distracting from focusing on the road!

(This is the chief executive of a pretty big technology company. You think he would be smarter? Or that his board will be discouraging him from doing this any more)

Quote
Daniel Friedmann, long-time chief executive officer of MacDonald Dettwiler and Associates Ltd., cycles year-round to and from his home in Vancouverís Kitsilano neighbourhood to the space-technology companyís Richmond headquarters. He pedals 45 minutes each way on a bike he bought at Costco, listening to podcast lectures on an iPod.

Mr. Friedmann is an idiot. Anyone on a bike listening to an iPod or whatever is just inviting death.

Clearly he's not the brightest. Who buys a bike at Costco?

I put my right earphone in and leave the left one out (my traffic side.)  My commute is 90% bike paths, and only 10% streets.

I thought that would be a safe compromise.  Should I not?

You should not. Even on a bike path sound is important to safety.
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marigolds
looks far too young to be a
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i had fun once and it was awful


« Reply #2027 on: April 02, 2012, 1:25:56 PM »

Do any of you do this crazy thing? (I will underline that this 45 minute ride would be up a pretty significant hill and little riding on bike paths or bike lanes.) How can you ride in city traffic and listen to podcasts? I can't think of anything more distracting from focusing on the road!

(This is the chief executive of a pretty big technology company. You think he would be smarter? Or that his board will be discouraging him from doing this any more)

Quote
Daniel Friedmann, long-time chief executive officer of MacDonald Dettwiler and Associates Ltd., cycles year-round to and from his home in Vancouverís Kitsilano neighbourhood to the space-technology companyís Richmond headquarters. He pedals 45 minutes each way on a bike he bought at Costco, listening to podcast lectures on an iPod.

Mr. Friedmann is an idiot. Anyone on a bike listening to an iPod or whatever is just inviting death.

Clearly he's not the brightest. Who buys a bike at Costco?

I put my right earphone in and leave the left one out (my traffic side.)  My commute is 90% bike paths, and only 10% streets.

I thought that would be a safe compromise.  Should I not?

You should not. Even on a bike path sound is important to safety.

Okey-doke, then I won't anymore! (I am easily bored.)
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eigen
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« Reply #2028 on: April 02, 2012, 2:53:44 PM »

So I'm rebuilding an old 1983 Schwinn Voyageur touring bike. Frame is in great shape, as are the cranks/front chain-rings, but I want to upgrade pretty much everything else. I think I've picked out some decent components that should work well with each other and the bike, but I'd appreciate thoughts/comments.

Here's what I'm looking at to start with:

WE278 27" Sun CR-18/Quando Sealed Bearing Wheelsets for Thread On Freewheels (From Harris Cyclery)

Some Schwalbe TRB33 Marathon Tires (Also from Harris Cyclery)

I'd also like to upgrade to a 6 or 7 ring rear freewheel- it will require re-spacing the rear forks, but cold setting an old steel frame like this is pretty easy, and would allow me to move up to indexed shifting instead of the friction shifters that are currently on it. But, since it's only decently easy to get indexed shifters for 7 speeds, I'll probably move up to a 7 ring rear freewheel, giving:

Shimano Hyperglide thread-on freewheels (13 - 15 - 17 - 19 - 21 - 24 - 28 FW722), with

Deore SGS, Top Normal Rear Derailleur, and

Shimano ST-EF65 7 Speed EZ-Fire Levers- I want to move to a "moustache" bar set up, and away from the traditional drop bars.

For the front, I'm keeping the chain rings and crank, but I need a new derailleur if I want to swap to indexed shifting, so:

Shimano R453 for "road" chainwheels with straight (mtb) handlebars FD4428, which should allow me to use the current (large) chain rings with indexed MTB shifters.

And then, as I mentioned, some moustache bars:

Butterfly "Trekking" handlebars HB003.

I'm intending this bike for touring/commuting, so something sturdy, with a more upright riding position. Never really liked touring on drops.

I know all the components aren't top of the line, but they should be decent- it's hard to really get a feel for what the bike will be like built (although I have some general ideas), so I want to hit the midline between cheap components and spending a fortune. Assuming it works out as well as I think it will, my first upgrade will probably be some custom-built wheels. The roads around here are very harsh.
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eigen
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« Reply #2029 on: April 02, 2012, 4:27:02 PM »

Whoops. I just realized that the links to the components might be considered not-kosher. If so, sorry- I'm just past my edit window on it, or I'd do it myself.
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octoprof
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« Reply #2030 on: April 02, 2012, 5:41:20 PM »

Whoops. I just realized that the links to the components might be considered not-kosher. If so, sorry- I'm just past my edit window on it, or I'd do it myself.

Your plan is interesting, eigen. I don't think you are trying to sell something, just trying to get input on something so it's probably ok.

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eigen
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« Reply #2031 on: April 02, 2012, 5:49:15 PM »

Yeah, I didn't think about it until after I posted, since my intent was pure.

It should be a fun project. I really like the frame build of the older touring bikes... And since my touring bike got stolen off campus last year, I need to replace it somehow.
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johnr
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Posts: 2,632


« Reply #2032 on: April 02, 2012, 6:07:43 PM »

So I'm rebuilding an old 1983 Schwinn Voyageur touring bike. Frame is in great shape, as are the cranks/front chain-rings, but I want to upgrade pretty much everything else. I think I've picked out some decent components that should work well with each other and the bike, but I'd appreciate thoughts/comments.

Here's what I'm looking at to start with:

WE278 27" Sun CR-18/Quando Sealed Bearing Wheelsets for Thread On Freewheels (From Harris Cyclery)

Some Schwalbe TRB33 Marathon Tires (Also from Harris Cyclery)

I'd also like to upgrade to a 6 or 7 ring rear freewheel- it will require re-spacing the rear forks, but cold setting an old steel frame like this is pretty easy, and would allow me to move up to indexed shifting instead of the friction shifters that are currently on it. But, since it's only decently easy to get indexed shifters for 7 speeds, I'll probably move up to a 7 ring rear freewheel, giving:

Shimano Hyperglide thread-on freewheels (13 - 15 - 17 - 19 - 21 - 24 - 28 FW722), with

Deore SGS, Top Normal Rear Derailleur, and

Shimano ST-EF65 7 Speed EZ-Fire Levers- I want to move to a "moustache" bar set up, and away from the traditional drop bars.

For the front, I'm keeping the chain rings and crank, but I need a new derailleur if I want to swap to indexed shifting, so:

Shimano R453 for "road" chainwheels with straight (mtb) handlebars FD4428, which should allow me to use the current (large) chain rings with indexed MTB shifters.

And then, as I mentioned, some moustache bars:

Butterfly "Trekking" handlebars HB003.

I'm intending this bike for touring/commuting, so something sturdy, with a more upright riding position. Never really liked touring on drops.

I know all the components aren't top of the line, but they should be decent- it's hard to really get a feel for what the bike will be like built (although I have some general ideas), so I want to hit the midline between cheap components and spending a fortune. Assuming it works out as well as I think it will, my first upgrade will probably be some custom-built wheels. The roads around here are very harsh.

What a fun project, but I hate to see a classic 1983 Voyageur lose it's down tube shifters! 
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eigen
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Posts: 563


« Reply #2033 on: April 02, 2012, 6:32:48 PM »

I honestly thought about keeping them, and am still going back and forth.

I really don't mind the friction shifting that much, but some of the parts from that era are getting harder and harder to find. I need to replace the rear derailleur for sure, and most of the replacement parts I can find are for indexed rather than friction shifting.

I really didn't mind the downtube shifters for touring, since it was much more of a constant speed exercise- but for commuting around town, I find myself cycling gears a lot more, and indexed shifting would be really nice.
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johnr
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Posts: 2,632


« Reply #2034 on: April 02, 2012, 6:56:47 PM »

I honestly thought about keeping them, and am still going back and forth.

I really don't mind the friction shifting that much, but some of the parts from that era are getting harder and harder to find. I need to replace the rear derailleur for sure, and most of the replacement parts I can find are for indexed rather than friction shifting.

I really didn't mind the downtube shifters for touring, since it was much more of a constant speed exercise- but for commuting around town, I find myself cycling gears a lot more, and indexed shifting would be really nice.

I recently converted my old circa 1980's Trek 560 to a daily commuter in much the same manner.  I had to lose the old suntour components to get a system with a wider gear range (and a real derailleur capable of taking up the chain slack), and that broke my heart, but I kept the friction downtube shifters. 
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cc_alan
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« Reply #2035 on: April 21, 2012, 5:55:21 PM »

Yo, cyclists! The weather is and has been great in many areas and so it's time to check your bike. Octo and others, please correct me, add to it, or simply mackerel-slap if needed.

  • Get those brakes adjusted/checked. I had to stop suddenly last week when someone almost turned into me and I was very thankful that I had recently adjusted my brakes.

  • Check your tires for wear. I had a blowout a couple of months ago because of excess wear. I thought my rear rim was tweaked (I've tweaked numerous rims over the past few years) which is why I didn't look closer. Big mistake! The tube bubbled through the wear spot and I was fortunate that I was very close to home when it happened. As for my custom-built rim, it's fine and I've put about 1500 miles on the new one so it looks like my bent rim days are over!

  • Why not take your bike to a shop and get it tuned-up? if you purchased the bike at the shop, they may do simple adjustments for free for as long as you own it. My gears felt like they were slipping but I put it off because I didn't want any down-time from using the bike to commute to work. Yes, I know I was being stupid. So I finally called the shop (same one from which I purchased the bike) early in the evening recently and the mechanic told me to go ahead and bring it in and he'd try and adjust it right away. This was less than 2 hours before the shop closed! So I raced over there and he told me that my rear gears and chain were worn and needed to be replaced (well over 5000 miles on them!). 15 minutes later I was leaving the shop and I was charged an amount less than a full tank of gas for the fix.

Anything else?

Alan
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barcrossliar
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« Reply #2036 on: April 21, 2012, 5:58:25 PM »

Make sure your lights are charged.
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octoprof
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« Reply #2037 on: April 21, 2012, 6:55:10 PM »

Yo, cyclists! The weather is and has been great in many areas and so it's time to check your bike. Octo and others, please correct me, add to it, or simply mackerel-slap if needed.

  • Get those brakes adjusted/checked. I had to stop suddenly last week when someone almost turned into me and I was very thankful that I had recently adjusted my brakes.

  • Check your tires for wear. I had a blowout a couple of months ago because of excess wear. I thought my rear rim was tweaked (I've tweaked numerous rims over the past few years) which is why I didn't look closer. Big mistake! The tube bubbled through the wear spot and I was fortunate that I was very close to home when it happened. As for my custom-built rim, it's fine and I've put about 1500 miles on the new one so it looks like my bent rim days are over!

  • Why not take your bike to a shop and get it tuned-up? if you purchased the bike at the shop, they may do simple adjustments for free for as long as you own it. My gears felt like they were slipping but I put it off because I didn't want any down-time from using the bike to commute to work. Yes, I know I was being stupid. So I finally called the shop (same one from which I purchased the bike) early in the evening recently and the mechanic told me to go ahead and bring it in and he'd try and adjust it right away. This was less than 2 hours before the shop closed! So I raced over there and he told me that my rear gears and chain were worn and needed to be replaced (well over 5000 miles on them!). 15 minutes later I was leaving the shop and I was charged an amount less than a full tank of gas for the fix.

Anything else?

Alan

I'm all about the tune up and yes, keep those lights' batteries charged up. I have two independent sets of lights on the hybrid and I plug in one of the two battery packs after each ride.

Regularly check your tires over. You can do this by just running your fingers lightly over them as you spin them one round.  You'll often find any scary stuff, if there is any, that way before you actually get a flat. Much better to change it at home in comfort than in the middle of a busy street in the rain or worse.

Your local bike shop is eager to help you! Stop by!

Meanwhile, I think either my bottom bracket is about to go (I had it repacked last fall) or my whole drive train is about worn out (13 years old!). I'm hoping to sort out what has to be done this week.
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bcohlan1
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« Reply #2038 on: April 21, 2012, 11:57:58 PM »

Make sure all your spokes are intact from time to time.  I tend to break them and not notice.
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octoprof
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« Reply #2039 on: April 22, 2012, 12:58:33 AM »

Make sure all your spokes are intact from time to time.  I tend to break them and not notice.

I have a couple of friends who break lots of spokes. I have never broken one. I am heavy and have worn out a bottom bracket and possibly a drive train, but never a spoke. Maybe I just have tough wheels?
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